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Old 28-08-2007, 08:22 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

In article [email protected] org,
(Glenna Rose) wrote:

writes:
But do they effectively clump cat urine?


I haven't used the clay scooping litter, so I can't give a direct
comparison, but yes the Sweat Scoop seems to clump OK. The clumps
have something of a loose structure (can tend to fall apart) when they
are still wet. If they dry out for a day or so they are more
cohesive. Sometimes you get wet litter on the bottom of the pan -
I've never seen this as a huge or unsolvable problem but some people I
know can't stand it.

Otherwise I may as well use Feline Pine. [a non-clumping but
flushable litter]


There's a strong element of preference in this (both your preference
and your cat's). My cat was very tolerant when she was new and I was
trying out different litters.


The clumping after a number of hours (vs. within minutes) would be an
issue for those of us who have automatic litter boxes. I would really
like a "friendlier" litter, but clumping for the rake is important as it
rakes ten minutes after the cat has been there. The clay litter works
fine, but I have little choice but to send it to the dump as I have pretty
much put it all the places I can without compromising my garden. :-(

Glenna


That clumping litter is terrible in the garden. I've removed all that
was dumped their early on before I learned better!
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Old 22-07-2018, 03:44 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

replying to Omelet, frugalmoving wrote:
I would try using diatomaceous earth (food grade) powder for the bugs. I use
it on my tomato plants and it works wonders. It is completely harmless to the
plant, but bugs hate it. It is like razor blades to them. They get cut up
and dry out. Its also harmless and it can be ingested for cleaning your colon
or used externally for skin exfoliation . I use it to keep ants out of
certain areas as well.

For the other problem with your water, I have a solution: colloidal silver.
I use it personally for a million things. The latest one is when I had a
really bad strawberry plant that litterally had mold growing all over the
plant and was inches from death. As a last resort to save it and to test out
the silver, I put some in a spray bottle and sprayed the entire outer leaves
and stems of the plant. I also applied some to the water and roots.

What happened next was better than I expected. The plant made a full and
speedy recovery, all mold was gone, and since silver really doesn't go away,
the plant will most likely be free from bacteria and disease for a long time
to come. Try it out!

Oh yeah another benefit: colloidal silver kills bug eggs and makes some bugs
sterile. Check it out!

Good luck.

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for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/edible...ion-19949-.htm


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Old 22-07-2018, 05:57 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 637
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

On 7/22/2018 9:44 AM, frugalmoving wrote:
replying to Omelet, frugalmoving wrote:
I would try using diatomaceous earth (food grade) powder for the
bugs.¬* I use
it on my tomato plants and it works wonders.¬* It is completely
harmless to the
plant, but bugs hate it.¬* It is like razor blades to them.¬* They get
cut up
and dry out.¬* Its also harmless and it can be ingested for cleaning
your colon
or used externally for skin exfoliation .¬* I use it to keep ants out of
certain areas as well.
For the other problem with your water, I have a solution: colloidal
silver.¬* I use it personally for a million things.¬* The latest one is
when I had a
really bad strawberry plant that litterally had mold growing all over the
plant and was inches from death.¬* As a last resort to save it and to
test out
the silver, I put some in a spray bottle and sprayed the entire outer
leaves
and stems of the plant. I also applied some to the water and roots.
What happened next was better than I expected.¬* The plant made¬* a full
and
speedy recovery, all mold was gone, and since silver really doesn't go
away,
the plant will most likely be free from bacteria and disease for a
long time
to come.¬*¬* Try it out!
Oh yeah another benefit: colloidal silver kills bug eggs and makes
some bugs
sterile.¬* Check it out!

Good luck.

¬* I've never used silver . DE works well for some bugs , esp. those
with hard outer shells like beetles¬* but for hornworms the solution is
Dipel , also known as Bacillus Thurigensis Kurstaki . I find it easier
to get a uniform application using dust and a small hand pump duster . I
use the same unit to apply DE - the thing is that if DE gets wet it
loses effectiveness and must be re-applied . We get heavy dew here
almost daily this time of year ...

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety .
Get off my lawn !

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Old 22-07-2018, 08:21 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,718
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

Terry Coombs wrote:
....
¬* I've never used silver . DE works well for some bugs , esp. those
with hard outer shells like beetles¬* but for hornworms the solution is
Dipel , also known as Bacillus Thurigensis Kurstaki . I find it easier
to get a uniform application using dust and a small hand pump duster . I
use the same unit to apply DE - the thing is that if DE gets wet it
loses effectiveness and must be re-applied . We get heavy dew here
almost daily this time of year ...


i don't see many bugs on the tomatoes i want to
discourage. i much prefer to not cause problems
by spraying anything if i can help it. so far so
good.


songbird


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Old 23-07-2018, 02:10 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 637
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

On 7/22/2018 2:21 PM, songbird wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
...
¬* I've never used silver . DE works well for some bugs , esp. those
with hard outer shells like beetles¬* but for hornworms the solution is
Dipel , also known as Bacillus Thurigensis Kurstaki . I find it easier
to get a uniform application using dust and a small hand pump duster . I
use the same unit to apply DE - the thing is that if DE gets wet it
loses effectiveness and must be re-applied . We get heavy dew here
almost daily this time of year ...

i don't see many bugs on the tomatoes i want to
discourage. i much prefer to not cause problems
by spraying anything if i can help it. so far so
good.


songbird


¬* I take exception to a caterpillar/worm that eats all the foliage -
and green tomatoes - off my tomato plants . I've been plucking and
stomping , but as much fun as that is it gets old after a while . BtK is
harmful only to certain caterpillar-type pests . DE will also affect
pollinators , which is one of the reasons I don't often use it . I'm
VERY careful with what I use and when , I'd hate to poison my bees .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety .
Get off my lawn !

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Old 23-07-2018, 03:18 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,718
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

Terry Coombs wrote:
....
¬* I take exception to a caterpillar/worm that eats all the foliage -
and green tomatoes - off my tomato plants . I've been plucking and
stomping , but as much fun as that is it gets old after a while .


i've not seen any this year so far, they usually appear
early to mid July. *knocks on wood*

they are not impossible to control here with manual
methods. we don't grow many plants compared to before
so to go out in the early morning to check plants can
be quick. just look for any damage and then look on
the ground for where the droppings are at and see if i
can find it. sometimes i can't for a day or two and
yes the damage can be more than i'd like, but i'll
get into why below...


BtK is
harmful only to certain caterpillar-type pests . DE will also affect
pollinators , which is one of the reasons I don't often use it . I'm
VERY careful with what I use and when , I'd hate to poison my bees .


i'm not convinced that most of what is being done
these days with bacteria and other controls is actually
studied enough and i sure don't want any collateral
damage to creatures not directly causing harm. so to
me if i can't do it manually or close to that then i
tend to avoid it. i've just seen too many examples
of where people who develop such things say one thing
but years later scientists who study such things find
out the damage is different than what was originally
thought.

i am in big favor of studing as much as possible
and learning, but there has to be a point where some-
one stands up and says that we need to be a lot more
careful with things than we have been up to this
point.

the big collapse in many insect populations is
not a good thing. not if you understand ecosystems
and how energy and plants and insects work together
and how they are broken down by fungi and such. it's
a very interconnected system and yes there are
various pathways, but a lot of those pathways are
now being disrupted and it's going to come back on
us eventually.

the older generations seem to say "so what, it's
just a bug, it carries disease or eats my crops or
whatever get rid of it" but that approach is laden
with future problems. there are other ways of
dealing with damage, plant more, increase diversity
and accept some losses where you can. this planet
now needs every break it can get.

i took a drive the other day. in the middle of
summer a drive in the car would often result in
plenty of bugs on the front of the car or the
windshield. not this time and not for a while. this
is in a state and area with plenty of woodlands and
some wild areas. we've lost a lot of the frogs and
toads that used to be common too.


songbird
  #8   Report Post  
Old 23-07-2018, 04:19 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2018
Posts: 12
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

On Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 12:57:27 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 7/22/2018 9:44 AM, frugalmoving wrote:
replying to Omelet, frugalmoving wrote:
I would try using diatomaceous earth (food grade) powder for the
bugs.¬* I use
it on my tomato plants and it works wonders.¬* It is completely
harmless to the
plant, but bugs hate it.¬* It is like razor blades to them.¬* They get
cut up
and dry out.¬* Its also harmless and it can be ingested for cleaning
your colon
or used externally for skin exfoliation .¬* I use it to keep ants out of
certain areas as well.
For the other problem with your water, I have a solution: colloidal
silver.¬* I use it personally for a million things.¬* The latest one is
when I had a
really bad strawberry plant that litterally had mold growing all over the
plant and was inches from death.¬* As a last resort to save it and to
test out
the silver, I put some in a spray bottle and sprayed the entire outer
leaves
and stems of the plant. I also applied some to the water and roots.
What happened next was better than I expected.¬* The plant made¬* a full
and
speedy recovery, all mold was gone, and since silver really doesn't go
away,
the plant will most likely be free from bacteria and disease for a
long time
to come.¬*¬* Try it out!
Oh yeah another benefit: colloidal silver kills bug eggs and makes
some bugs
sterile.¬* Check it out!

Good luck.

¬* I've never used silver . DE works well for some bugs , esp. those
with hard outer shells like beetles¬* but for hornworms the solution is
Dipel , also known as Bacillus Thurigensis Kurstaki . I find it easier
to get a uniform application using dust and a small hand pump duster . I
use the same unit to apply DE - the thing is that if DE gets wet it
loses effectiveness and must be re-applied . We get heavy dew here
almost daily this time of year ...

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety .
Get off my lawn !


You guys do realize that the OP is more than 10 years old?
  #9   Report Post  
Old 23-07-2018, 04:35 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2012
Posts: 637
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

On 7/23/2018 10:19 AM, wrote:
On Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 12:57:27 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 7/22/2018 9:44 AM, frugalmoving wrote:
replying to Omelet, frugalmoving wrote:
I would try using diatomaceous earth (food grade) powder for the
bugs.¬* I use
it on my tomato plants and it works wonders.¬* It is completely
harmless to the
plant, but bugs hate it.¬* It is like razor blades to them.¬* They get
cut up
and dry out.¬* Its also harmless and it can be ingested for cleaning
your colon
or used externally for skin exfoliation .¬* I use it to keep ants out of
certain areas as well.
For the other problem with your water, I have a solution: colloidal
silver.¬* I use it personally for a million things.¬* The latest one is
when I had a
really bad strawberry plant that litterally had mold growing all over the
plant and was inches from death.¬* As a last resort to save it and to
test out
the silver, I put some in a spray bottle and sprayed the entire outer
leaves
and stems of the plant. I also applied some to the water and roots.
What happened next was better than I expected.¬* The plant made¬* a full
and
speedy recovery, all mold was gone, and since silver really doesn't go
away,
the plant will most likely be free from bacteria and disease for a
long time
to come.¬*¬* Try it out!
Oh yeah another benefit: colloidal silver kills bug eggs and makes
some bugs
sterile.¬* Check it out!

Good luck.

¬* I've never used silver . DE works well for some bugs , esp. those
with hard outer shells like beetles¬* but for hornworms the solution is
Dipel , also known as Bacillus Thurigensis Kurstaki . I find it easier
to get a uniform application using dust and a small hand pump duster . I
use the same unit to apply DE - the thing is that if DE gets wet it
loses effectiveness and must be re-applied . We get heavy dew here
almost daily this time of year ...

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety .
Get off my lawn !

You guys do realize that the OP is more than 10 years old?


¬*I figured it wasn't exactly current since it came from Homemoanershub
.... but the info is still relevant and someone reading it now may benefit .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety .
Get off my lawn !

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Old 23-07-2018, 05:42 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2015
Posts: 215
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

On 7/22/2018 10:18 PM, songbird wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
...
¬* I take exception to a caterpillar/worm that eats all the foliage -
and green tomatoes - off my tomato plants . I've been plucking and
stomping , but as much fun as that is it gets old after a while .


i've not seen any this year so far, they usually appear
early to mid July. *knocks on wood*

they are not impossible to control here with manual
methods. we don't grow many plants compared to before
so to go out in the early morning to check plants can
be quick. just look for any damage and then look on
the ground for where the droppings are at and see if i
can find it. sometimes i can't for a day or two and
yes the damage can be more than i'd like, but i'll
get into why below...


BtK is
harmful only to certain caterpillar-type pests . DE will also affect
pollinators , which is one of the reasons I don't often use it . I'm
VERY careful with what I use and when , I'd hate to poison my bees .


i'm not convinced that most of what is being done
these days with bacteria and other controls is actually
studied enough and i sure don't want any collateral
damage to creatures not directly causing harm. so to
me if i can't do it manually or close to that then i
tend to avoid it. i've just seen too many examples
of where people who develop such things say one thing
but years later scientists who study such things find
out the damage is different than what was originally
thought.

i am in big favor of studing as much as possible
and learning, but there has to be a point where some-
one stands up and says that we need to be a lot more
careful with things than we have been up to this
point.

the big collapse in many insect populations is
not a good thing. not if you understand ecosystems
and how energy and plants and insects work together
and how they are broken down by fungi and such. it's
a very interconnected system and yes there are
various pathways, but a lot of those pathways are
now being disrupted and it's going to come back on
us eventually.

the older generations seem to say "so what, it's
just a bug, it carries disease or eats my crops or
whatever get rid of it" but that approach is laden
with future problems. there are other ways of
dealing with damage, plant more, increase diversity
and accept some losses where you can. this planet
now needs every break it can get.

i took a drive the other day. in the middle of
summer a drive in the car would often result in
plenty of bugs on the front of the car or the
windshield. not this time and not for a while. this
is in a state and area with plenty of woodlands and
some wild areas. we've lost a lot of the frogs and
toads that used to be common too.


songbird


I've seen waxing and waning of insects and animals around here.
We got invaded by gypsy moths years ago and now they are gone.
Stink bugs too now gone. Japanese beetles are no longer a problem.
I think it is the balance of nature. For example when stink bugs were
taking over, birds and bats were not eating them but maybe discovered
they liked that peppery taste. The bugs are around but are not a
pestilence.

I used to hunt central PA and during bow season at friends camp saw
scads of wild turkeys so I came back in the spring to turkey hunt for a
few days and did not see any or even hear anyone else shooting. Friend
figured fall turkey hunt and foxes wiped out the turkeys.

Someday this the balance of nature will occur with people.


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Old 23-07-2018, 05:45 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 215
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

On 7/23/2018 11:35 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 7/23/2018 10:19 AM, wrote:
On Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 12:57:27 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 7/22/2018 9:44 AM, frugalmoving wrote:
replying to Omelet, frugalmoving wrote:
I would try using diatomaceous earth (food grade) powder for the
bugs.¬* I use
it on my tomato plants and it works wonders.¬* It is completely
harmless to the
plant, but bugs hate it.¬* It is like razor blades to them.¬* They get
cut up
and dry out.¬* Its also harmless and it can be ingested for cleaning
your colon
or used externally for skin exfoliation .¬* I use it to keep ants out of
certain areas as well.
For the other problem with your water, I have a solution: colloidal
silver.¬* I use it personally for a million things.¬* The latest one is
when I had a
really bad strawberry plant that litterally had mold growing all
over the
plant and was inches from death.¬* As a last resort to save it and to
test out
the silver, I put some in a spray bottle and sprayed the entire outer
leaves
and stems of the plant. I also applied some to the water and roots.
What happened next was better than I expected.¬* The plant made¬* a full
and
speedy recovery, all mold was gone, and since silver really doesn't go
away,
the plant will most likely be free from bacteria and disease for a
long time
to come.¬*¬* Try it out!
Oh yeah another benefit: colloidal silver kills bug eggs and makes
some bugs
sterile.¬* Check it out!

Good luck.

¬* ¬* I've never used silver . DE works well for some bugs , esp. those
with hard outer shells like beetles¬* but for hornworms the solution is
Dipel , also known as Bacillus Thurigensis Kurstaki . I find it easier
to get a uniform application using dust and a small hand pump duster . I
use the same unit to apply DE - the thing is that if DE gets wet it
loses effectiveness and must be re-applied . We get heavy dew here
almost daily this time of year ...

--
¬*¬* Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety .
Get off my lawn !

You guys do realize that the OP is more than 10 years old?


¬*I figured it wasn't exactly current since it came from Homemoanershub
... but the info is still relevant and someone reading it now may benefit .

I missed it too but some topics are timeless. Malathion is said to be
not too poisonous but structurally to me it looks like a nerve gas agent.
  #12   Report Post  
Old 24-07-2018, 04:26 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,718
Default Tomato pesticides, anything better than Malathion?

wrote:
....
You guys do realize that the OP is more than 10 years old?


i assume anything coming from gardenbanter or homeowners hub
to be likely ancient, but if the topic is interesting and i
have time to reply i don't much mind it. it's not like this is
a high volume group now...


songbird


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