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Old 21-11-2011, 01:18 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Newbie with a bunch of questions.

Hi group,
Newbie here. Two years ago I moved into a new house and
for the first time in a long time, I have room for a garden.
So this summer I planted a garden just to see how things
would work out. Well, we didn't get steller results. But we
got something. Based on the results of or first season,
I have a bunch of questions.
For those who are currious; I planted:

Corn: The sqirrles ate about half the corn seeds out of the
ground before they could sprout. The stalks never got higher
than about 5 feet and the ears were very small. I had one
ear that had fully developed kernls but the ear was only a
few inches long.

Tomatoes: 4 types, All did reasonable well.

Zuchinni (harvested 4 vegitables), Egg plant (3), Yellow
crookneck (3), PattiPans (about 12), Lemon cuces (about 12).

Sweet pea pods and Bush beans (both did well)
2 kind of Lettuce (continuous crop, not too big leaves.)

Radishes and carrots (did not develop well).

Strawberries: These just showed up. Squirrls ended eating the
berries before I could pick them.

Currently I have all the leaves from the yard raked into the garden
to provide weed control.

I think I'll ask my questions indiviually.

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Old 21-11-2011, 01:44 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 3,036
Default Newbie with a bunch of questions.

Gordon wrote:
Hi group,
Newbie here. Two years ago I moved into a new house and
for the first time in a long time, I have room for a garden.
So this summer I planted a garden just to see how things
would work out. Well, we didn't get steller results. But we
got something. Based on the results of or first season,
I have a bunch of questions.


Where are you, what is your climate?

For those who are currious; I planted:

Corn: The sqirrles ate about half the corn seeds out of the
ground before they could sprout. The stalks never got higher
than about 5 feet and the ears were very small. I had one
ear that had fully developed kernls but the ear was only a
few inches long.


Corn needs full sun, long warm or hot days and plenty of water. It is a
heavy feeder, requiring fertile soil rich in nitrogen, this does not mean
burying them in urea or ammonium sulphate. Failure of any of these
conditions will give reduced plants and cobs. Incomplete cobs that have
"bald patches" instead of kernels is due to inadequate fertilisation. There
must be one grain of pollen for every kernel. Corn is wind pollinated so it
is better to plant in blocks not rows to make the precess more efficient.
If you do get a good crop of corn you will discover there are many birds and
animals that like it very much and they will race you to the ears unless you
exclude them.

Tomatoes: 4 types, All did reasonable well.

Zuchinni (harvested 4 vegitables), Egg plant (3), Yellow
crookneck (3), PattiPans (about 12), Lemon cuces (about 12).


Those are fairly poor returns on cucurbits, I would expect to get a dozen or
two fruit from a zuchinni or a cucumber. Are they in full sun, well watered
and fed? Did they have room to get sun and full root development? Do you
have bees active?

Sweet pea pods and Bush beans (both did well)
2 kind of Lettuce (continuous crop, not too big leaves.)

Radishes and carrots (did not develop well).

Strawberries: These just showed up. Squirrls ended eating the
berries before I could pick them.

Currently I have all the leaves from the yard raked into the garden
to provide weed control.

I think I'll ask my questions indiviually.


David

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Old 21-11-2011, 09:04 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Nov 2011
Posts: 20
Default Newbie with a bunch of questions.

"David Hare-Scott" wrote in
:

Gordon wrote:
Hi group,
Newbie here. Two years ago I moved into a new house and
for the first time in a long time, I have room for a garden.
So this summer I planted a garden just to see how things
would work out. Well, we didn't get steller results. But we
got something. Based on the results of or first season,
I have a bunch of questions.


Where are you, what is your climate?


Ah, yes. That would be a key bit of information. Wouldn't it?
I am in Portland, OR. We have two seasons: It's Raining, and
Rain's Coming.


For those who are currious; I planted:

Corn: The sqirrles ate about half the corn seeds out of the
ground before they could sprout. The stalks never got higher
than about 5 feet and the ears were very small. I had one
ear that had fully developed kernls but the ear was only a
few inches long.


Corn needs full sun, long warm or hot days and plenty of water. It is
a heavy feeder, requiring fertile soil rich in nitrogen, this does not
mean burying them in urea or ammonium sulphate. Failure of any of
these conditions will give reduced plants and cobs. Incomplete cobs
that have "bald patches" instead of kernels is due to inadequate
fertilisation. There must be one grain of pollen for every kernel.
Corn is wind pollinated so it is better to plant in blocks not rows to
make the precess more efficient. If you do get a good crop of corn you
will discover there are many birds and animals that like it very much
and they will race you to the ears unless you exclude them.


The corn was a big experiment. To tell the truth; I wasn't expecting
much. I may plant another cluster (yes, I planted in clusters) next
season just to act as a barrometer to see if I get any improvememt.

Tomatoes: 4 types, All did reasonable well.

Zuchinni (harvested 4 vegitables), Egg plant (3), Yellow
crookneck (3), PattiPans (about 12), Lemon cuces (about 12).


Those are fairly poor returns on cucurbits, I would expect to get a
dozen or two fruit from a zuchinni or a cucumber. Are they in full
sun, well watered and fed? Did they have room to get sun and full
root development? Do you have bees active?


I lost several fruits that fell off the vine while they were small.
I'm not sure why. Also, not every blossom developed fruit. Perhaps
this is a pollination issue? I wonder if planting some flowers
(marigolds?) in the garden would attract bees?

As far as feeding and watering; The soil was initially very poor
and I mixed in peat moss and the leaves that I used as winter
mulch to try and create a looser more loamy soil. I also mixed in
a bit of plant food as well. The plants were watered daily and
well soaked.


Sweet pea pods and Bush beans (both did well)
2 kind of Lettuce (continuous crop, not too big leaves.)

Radishes and carrots (did not develop well).

Strawberries: These just showed up. Squirrls ended eating the
berries before I could pick them.

Currently I have all the leaves from the yard raked into the garden
to provide weed control.

I think I'll ask my questions indiviually.


David


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Old 21-11-2011, 09:49 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,036
Default Newbie with a bunch of questions.

Gordon wrote:
"David Hare-Scott" wrote in
:

Gordon wrote:
Hi group,
Newbie here. Two years ago I moved into a new house and
for the first time in a long time, I have room for a garden.
So this summer I planted a garden just to see how things
would work out. Well, we didn't get steller results. But we
got something. Based on the results of or first season,
I have a bunch of questions.


Where are you, what is your climate?


Ah, yes. That would be a key bit of information. Wouldn't it?
I am in Portland, OR. We have two seasons: It's Raining, and
Rain's Coming.


Ah yes, the home of the great Linus Pauling, where hoseholders compliment
each other on the decoration of their mud room.

The odd thing is that looking at the statistics on WikiP Sydney (for an
example I am familiar with) has more rain and only a little more sunshine,
yet Sydney is not noted for being wet or gloomy.



For those who are currious; I planted:

Corn: The sqirrles ate about half the corn seeds out of the
ground before they could sprout. The stalks never got higher
than about 5 feet and the ears were very small. I had one
ear that had fully developed kernls but the ear was only a
few inches long.


Corn needs full sun, long warm or hot days and plenty of water. It
is a heavy feeder, requiring fertile soil rich in nitrogen, this
does not mean burying them in urea or ammonium sulphate. Failure of
any of these conditions will give reduced plants and cobs.
Incomplete cobs that have "bald patches" instead of kernels is due
to inadequate fertilisation. There must be one grain of pollen for
every kernel. Corn is wind pollinated so it is better to plant in
blocks not rows to make the precess more efficient. If you do get a
good crop of corn you will discover there are many birds and animals
that like it very much and they will race you to the ears unless you
exclude them.


The corn was a big experiment. To tell the truth; I wasn't expecting
much. I may plant another cluster (yes, I planted in clusters) next
season just to act as a barrometer to see if I get any improvememt.

Tomatoes: 4 types, All did reasonable well.

Zuchinni (harvested 4 vegitables), Egg plant (3), Yellow
crookneck (3), PattiPans (about 12), Lemon cuces (about 12).


Those are fairly poor returns on cucurbits, I would expect to get a
dozen or two fruit from a zuchinni or a cucumber. Are they in full
sun, well watered and fed? Did they have room to get sun and full
root development? Do you have bees active?


I lost several fruits that fell off the vine while they were small.
I'm not sure why. Also, not every blossom developed fruit. Perhaps
this is a pollination issue? I wonder if planting some flowers
(marigolds?) in the garden would attract bees?

As far as feeding and watering; The soil was initially very poor
and I mixed in peat moss and the leaves that I used as winter
mulch to try and create a looser more loamy soil. I also mixed in
a bit of plant food as well. The plants were watered daily and
well soaked.


Sweet pea pods and Bush beans (both did well)
2 kind of Lettuce (continuous crop, not too big leaves.)

Radishes and carrots (did not develop well).

Strawberries: These just showed up. Squirrls ended eating the
berries before I could pick them.

Currently I have all the leaves from the yard raked into the garden
to provide weed control.

I think I'll ask my questions indiviually.


David



It is hard to say without seeing what has happened but one possibility is
too wet and not enough sun. Corn and cucurbits (any plant that needs
energy to make fruit) need full sun. Extended periods of rain or cloud are
equivalent to heavy shade. Also cucurbits in particular are susceptible to
fungi which is made worse in such conditions, powdery mildew for example can
set them back very badly.

D

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Old 22-11-2011, 09:11 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Newbie with a bunch of questions.

"David Hare-Scott" wrote in
:





It is hard to say without seeing what has happened but one possibility
is too wet and not enough sun. Corn and cucurbits (any plant that
needs energy to make fruit) need full sun. Extended periods of rain
or cloud are equivalent to heavy shade. Also cucurbits in particular
are susceptible to fungi which is made worse in such conditions,
powdery mildew for example can set them back very badly.

D



Hmmm,
Looks like I had all those problems. Actually, we had a fairly sunny
and dry summer. Once it finaly showed up. But it was several weeks
into the season before I noticed that the garden was too shady.
I helped the situation some what by trimming a branch off the
offending tree. But it was several more weeks before I learned
that my neighbor had a pole saw and I took off another branch.
We did have a white fungus on the leaves. I tried a few remidies
that were some help. Add to that the poor soil. I am getting some
good advise on how to properly prepare the soil for next season.


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Old 22-12-2011, 12:50 PM
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Hi! I'm a newbie and I have a bunch of questions too...
Fist one: how to grow strawberries so they are big, but now watery but actually sweet? is there a special sort of such strawberries?
and another one: how to take care about chinesis rose? (did i spell it right?)

i'm sorry if i'm off-topic, but this is just my 1st post
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Old 23-12-2011, 02:53 PM
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Location: Norfolk U.K
Posts: 14
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowell81 View Post
Hi! I'm a newbie and I have a bunch of questions too...
Fist one: how to grow strawberries so they are big, but now watery but actually sweet? is there a special sort of such strawberries?
and another one: how to take care about chinesis rose? (did i spell it right?)

i'm sorry if i'm off-topic, but this is just my 1st post
Welcome Lowell81,
It would help if we knew where you were!
Regarding straw berries, there are large fruited varieties, but I find the bigger they are the less flavour they've got. This is, I should add a purely personal generalisation and probably quite unfair, that said, try the 'alpine' varieties, they may be small, but the taste is to die for!! My grand kids love them, I grow them in hanging baskets so they can't reach them!! that way I actually get tp eat a few myself!
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Old 23-12-2011, 04:41 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 15
Default Newbie with a bunch of questions.

On Nov 21, 3:04 pm, Gordon wrote:

Ah, yes. That would be a key bit of information. Wouldn't it?
I am in Portland, OR. We have two seasons: It's Raining, and
Rain's Coming.



Andy comments:

Ahh, yes..... Have you considered rice ????

:))) Andy in Texas, where , when it rained for
forty days and nights,,,,,,,, we got about an inch....
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Old 23-01-2012, 04:43 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowell81 View Post
Hi! I'm a newbie and I have a bunch of questions too...
Fist one: how to grow strawberries so they are big, but now watery but actually sweet? is there a special sort of such strawberries?
and another one: how to take care about chinesis rose? (did i spell it right?)

i'm sorry if i'm off-topic, but this is just my 1st post
Hey I totaly agree alpines are the best, they are teeny little fruit but taste amazing, ive got a plant sat out in a pot on my table and its flowering again,
it just keeps going really well, not died back at all. bareing in mind its the middle of winter.

as for cucumbers/marrows etc we were getting loads of them off the plants we had, they do like it warm though. if you can get a green house or poly tunnel its worth it as it increases the growing season and crops like tomatoes and cucumbers do much better in them.

good luck next season. theres nothing like growing your own veg and fruit


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