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Old 02-02-2012, 03:45 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default compost and eggshells

I compost most kitchen scraps except for dairy, meat and fats. For a
long time I would include eggshells. I would try to break the shells
into smaller pieces either in the kitchen or once in the compost pile. I
seldom turn my compost except when harvesting some so it is slow not
fast. The egg shells don't seem to break down at all so I have stopped
adding them. USA Zone 7 A/B (right on the border in NC) if it matters.

QUESTIONS:
- Am I missing much by no longer adding the shells to the value of the
general compost?
- I have always planted above ground crops so far in my very small
raised bed garden. If I plant things like carrots, onions or potatoes is
there a chance small bits of egg shells in the soil will embed
themselves in the vegetables?
- any value in segregating egg shells into their own compost pile and if
so where would it best be used?


Thanks in advance for any insights.


Brian

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Old 02-02-2012, 05:45 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default compost and eggshells

On Feb 2, 10:45*am, Fvert wrote:
I compost most kitchen scraps except for dairy, meat and fats. For a
long time I would include eggshells. I would try to break the shells
into smaller pieces either in the kitchen or once in the compost pile. I
seldom turn my compost except when harvesting some so it is slow not
fast. The egg shells don't seem to break down at all so I have stopped
adding them. USA Zone 7 A/B (right on the border in NC) if it matters.

QUESTIONS:
- Am I missing much by no longer adding the shells to the value of the
general compost?
- I have always planted above ground crops so far in my very small
raised bed garden. If I plant things like carrots, onions or potatoes is
there a chance small bits of egg shells in the soil will embed
themselves in the vegetables?
- any value in segregating egg shells into their own compost pile and if
so where would it best be used?

Thanks in advance for any insights.

Brian


This was just discussed on rec.garden if you can get to that. There
are 22 posts so you can imagine that there are conflicting opinions
MJ
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Old 03-02-2012, 02:53 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default compost and eggshells

In article
,
" wrote:

This was just discussed on rec.garden if you can get to that. There
are 22 posts so you can imagine that there are conflicting opinions



I don't normally subscribe to that group but will check it out. Thanks.


Brian
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:12 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default compost and eggshells

On Feb 2, 9:45 am, Fvert wrote:
I compost most kitchen scraps except for dairy, meat and fats. For a
long time I would include eggshells. I would try to break the shells
into smaller pieces either in the kitchen or once in the compost pile. I
seldom turn my compost except when harvesting some so it is slow not
fast. The egg shells don't seem to break down at all so I have stopped
adding them. USA Zone 7 A/B (right on the border in NC) if it matters.

QUESTIONS:
- Am I missing much by no longer adding the shells to the value of the
general compost?
- I have always planted above ground crops so far in my very small
raised bed garden. If I plant things like carrots, onions or potatoes is
there a chance small bits of egg shells in the soil will embed
themselves in the vegetables?
- any value in segregating egg shells into their own compost pile and if
so where would it best be used?

Thanks in advance for any insights.

Brian


Andy writes:
I also use raised beds.
When I have meat scraps, I just dig a little hole about a foot deep,
and bury them in the beds. Then I put a brick or stone over the
covered hole so the dog won't dig there, and I know where the
meat is buried...... Eggshells are the same.......

One doesn't need to "compost" meat scraps. Eventually, a foot
underground, they will rot and ferment or whatever, and the nutrients
will promote worms, bacteria, and nitrogen. In the spring, I
transplant my tomato seedlings on top of each buried trove......

I do the same for squirrel and rabbit offal, after I have dressed
them out and put the good parts in the freezer. I bury both offal
and fur in the hole. My garden produces well......

The biggest problem I have is Lollypop's sense of smell. She
knows something stinky is buried and wants to dig it up. So I have
to put some sort of cover on it, brick or big rock, to discourage her.
An alternative is to lay some fencing material over it, like a small
section
of chain link, that she can't dig thru, but can be easily removed
later
when I need to plant.
So far, it works well.......

Andy in Eureka, Texas
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Old 07-02-2012, 04:15 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default compost and eggshells



http://www.aces.edu/timelyinfo/Ag%20...er/s-05-05.pdf

"Coarsely crushed eggshells are relatively ineffective as a soil
liming material or as a source of calcium. Although the sample used in
this study had a total neutralizing value of 59% of pure calcium
carbonate, it had to be very finely ground in order to be effective at
increasing soil pH. Broken egg- shells can be safely land applied.
Nitrogen from protein residues in eggshells and possibly other
nutrients will eventually add to the fertility of the soil. Except for
nitrogen, this will probably be a*very slow process. Therefore, unless
shells are mechanically ground at least as finely as ground
agricultural limestone, they should not be used as a substitute for
conventional soil liming materials. However, we do not suspect any
negative effect from their application to the soil."

Also:http://www.aces.edu/timelyinfo/Ag%20...er/s-05-05.pdf



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