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Old 11-02-2012, 06:25 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default It's about time ...

In article ,
says...
Sean Straw wrote:


Not all marigold varieties are effective against nematodes. French
Marigolds are more effective than Aftican Marigolds for instance.

You misstate the case. The books and gurus all _say_ that French dwarf
marigolds are repellent. Unfortunately they offer no demonstrations, much less
actual proof. I am aware of the conventional wisdom. I cut my teeth on Mother



https://startpage.com/eng/advanced-s...cat=web&query=

field: all the words

criteria: studies marigolds nematodes

Scroll down to "At this domain type"

select "edu"

click the search button.


I skimmed off the following articles.


http://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/...pleins_textes_
5/pt5/nemato/36417.pdf


http://www.norfolkbotanicalgarden.or...ticulture-news

Dutch researchers did cover crop studies looking at the effectiveness of
over 800 varieties of marigolds on nematode populations. The scientists
found that apparently nematodes are attracted to marigold roots but are
killed when they try to feed due to the release of ozone from the
damaged root. There are two caveats. One is that the effectiveness of
killing nematodes is only with living marigold roots, once the marigolds
have been tilled in, there is no further benefit. The second is that
these were not companion plantings because two crops were not
interplanted.

The conclusion of these Dutch studies is that when an entire area has
been covered with marigolds, cover crops reduced the numbers of the very
common root-lesion nematode (Pratylenchus penetrans) enough in one
growing season that other crops susceptible to that pest could be grown
for two or three years without suffering from nematode damage. The
French Marigold (Tagetes patula) was the most effective, with the
variety 'Single Gold' providing the greatest benefit with almost 99
percent control.

1/28/2010

http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-35.pdf

http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/sustaina...g-marigold.pdf

http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0856/


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Old 12-02-2012, 03:00 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Nov 2011
Posts: 67
Default It's about time ...

In article ,
phorbin wrote:

In article ,
says...
Sean Straw wrote:


Not all marigold varieties are effective against nematodes. French
Marigolds are more effective than Aftican Marigolds for instance.

You misstate the case. The books and gurus all _say_ that French dwarf
marigolds are repellent. Unfortunately they offer no demonstrations, much
less
actual proof. I am aware of the conventional wisdom. I cut my teeth on
Mother



https://startpage.com/eng/advanced-s...cat=web&query=

field: all the words

criteria: studies marigolds nematodes

Scroll down to "At this domain type"

select "edu"

click the search button.


I skimmed off the following articles.


http://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/...pleins_textes_
5/pt5/nemato/36417.pdf


http://www.norfolkbotanicalgarden.or...ticulture-news

Dutch researchers did cover crop studies looking at the effectiveness of
over 800 varieties of marigolds on nematode populations. The scientists
found that apparently nematodes are attracted to marigold roots but are
killed when they try to feed due to the release of ozone from the
damaged root. There are two caveats. One is that the effectiveness of
killing nematodes is only with living marigold roots, once the marigolds
have been tilled in, there is no further benefit. The second is that
these were not companion plantings because two crops were not
interplanted.

The conclusion of these Dutch studies is that when an entire area has
been covered with marigolds, cover crops reduced the numbers of the very
common root-lesion nematode (Pratylenchus penetrans) enough in one
growing season that other crops susceptible to that pest could be grown
for two or three years without suffering from nematode damage. The
French Marigold (Tagetes patula) was the most effective, with the
variety 'Single Gold' providing the greatest benefit with almost 99
percent control.

1/28/2010

http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-35.pdf

http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/sustaina...g-marigold.pdf

http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0856/


Excellent post, phorbin.
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the clouds of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron.
- Dwight D. Eisenhower, 16 April 1953

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Old 14-02-2012, 09:47 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 544
Default It's about time ...

In article [email protected]
199.per.connect.net.au, lid says...

http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0856/

Excellent post, phorbin.


Thanks Billy.

Been researching politics more than gardening/agriculture recently.
  #19   Report Post  
Old 15-02-2012, 01:32 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Nov 2011
Posts: 67
Default It's about time ...

In article ,
phorbin wrote:

In article [email protected]
199.per.connect.net.au, lid says...

http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0856/

Excellent post, phorbin.


Thanks Billy.

Been researching politics more than gardening/agriculture recently.


Same here.

I'm afraid that the Greek crisis is heading this way with its political
corruption, and usurious banks. It reminds you of the way politicians us
into the state that we are in here.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/0,1518,814571,00.html

http://www.democracynow.org/2012/2/1...ce_severe_aust
erity


http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headline...ide-to-the-gre
ek-debt-crisis/
Like any state (or person, for that matter), it spent more money than it
took in. After the switch to the euro, the traditionally strong Greek
public sector saw wages rise to ultimately unsustainable levels. To
compound this, the retirement age in the country is low (by Western
standards) and benefits are generous.

But that alone is not enough to sink an economy.

Mass tax evasion, on the other hand, can certainly do the trick. And it
did in Greece. When people and businesses don't pay their taxes, it
limits revenue. So when the money inevitably ran out, Athens turned to
European banks for loans. Soon, the government was borrowing billions
and those debts, like subprime mortgages in the United States, were
often repackaged as c0mplex commodites and sold off around the
continent. Everyone, especially banks in France and Germany, wanted a
piece. Now they have it.

What's happened is that Europe itself has become too weak, in the
aftermath of the global financial meltdown, to bite the bullet on a
country like Greece. A default would shatter otherwise monetarily strong
countries like Germany. The Germans, like the Americans, would be left
with a host of "too big to fail" banks ready to do just that.
----

I just read:
"The Great American Stick Up: Greedy Bankers and the Politicians Who
Love Them", by Robert Scheer

"The Weather Makers: How Man Is Changing the Climate and What It Means
for Life on Earth", by Tim Flannery
(A 7 year old book, but seems to hold up fine. It also gives some
insight as to the consequences for Australia, since the author is
Australian.)

Presently, I'm reading/:
"The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness"
Michelle Alexander

and

"A Short History of Financial Euphoria", by John Kenneth Galbraith

I'd love to find a good book on gardening that doesn't repeat what I've
already read.

FOr the last 2 years, we have had very mild Jan. and Feb. This year is
no different, but if it keeps true to form, we should have a deluge any
old day now.

I'll start germinating lettuce and peas first, and then get into the
tomatoes, peppers, and the rest of the good stuff.
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the clouds of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron.
- Dwight D. Eisenhower, 16 April 1953



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