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Old 10-12-2014, 08:56 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Just recognize that wherever you plant horseradish, there will _always_
be horseradish. So be sure it's where you want it...and not too close to
anything else (or use a serious root barrier). It does not expand as
fast as mint, but it's almost impossible to ever get rid of.

The garlic should be fine. I do about 50 (per person) myself. A dozen or
so of those 50 source the 50 plantings for the next year (only looking
for ~4-5 cloves per head on average so I can plant _only_ the larger
cloves in a head, selecting the larger heads for seed, and eat the rest
of those broken-up heads at planting time.)

Actually got mine in before Thanksgiving this year, but as Bird also
said, I've done anywhere from well into December (which was "some point
when the ground surface thawed again" on a very behind year) to planted
when dug (or not dug at all, though that's not ideal from a
rotation/pest standpoint) and it's been fine. One of the lower stress
things to grow, for the most part. The only time I have had issues is
with spring planting - that simply does not work, and I'm zone 4. The
stuff laughs at the cold, barring bizarre circumstances.

For bees, clovers are always a good option, monarda (bee balm) lives up
to that common name and also gets hummers if you use the red variety,
mints (also a weed that spreads vigorously, so again, be careful where
you put them) and thymes all do well. Lavender works well if you can get
it to grow reliably (better drainage than I have would help.)

--
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Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.

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Old 10-12-2014, 09:07 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All dead , all dead ...

On 12/10/2014 3:56 PM, Ecnerwal wrote:
Just recognize that wherever you plant horseradish, there will _always_
be horseradish. So be sure it's where you want it...and not too close to
anything else (or use a serious root barrier). It does not expand as
fast as mint, but it's almost impossible to ever get rid of.

The garlic should be fine. I do about 50 (per person) myself. A dozen or
so of those 50 source the 50 plantings for the next year (only looking
for ~4-5 cloves per head on average so I can plant _only_ the larger
cloves in a head, selecting the larger heads for seed, and eat the rest
of those broken-up heads at planting time.)

Actually got mine in before Thanksgiving this year, but as Bird also
said, I've done anywhere from well into December (which was "some point
when the ground surface thawed again" on a very behind year) to planted
when dug (or not dug at all, though that's not ideal from a
rotation/pest standpoint) and it's been fine. One of the lower stress
things to grow, for the most part. The only time I have had issues is
with spring planting - that simply does not work, and I'm zone 4. The
stuff laughs at the cold, barring bizarre circumstances.

For bees, clovers are always a good option, monarda (bee balm) lives up
to that common name and also gets hummers if you use the red variety,
mints (also a weed that spreads vigorously, so again, be careful where
you put them) and thymes all do well. Lavender works well if you can get
it to grow reliably (better drainage than I have would help.)


Deer ate my horseradish years ago.
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Old 10-12-2014, 09:15 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All dead , all dead ...

Ecnerwal wrote:

For bees, clovers are always a good option, monarda (bee balm) lives
up to that common name and also gets hummers if you use the red
variety, mints (also a weed that spreads vigorously, so again, be
careful where you put them) and thymes all do well. Lavender works
well if you can get it to grow reliably (better drainage than I have
would help.)



Heh , I have some of every item on your list , and more . Out here in
the woods , we have a lot of space to plant this stuff . My plan is to focus
on using the power line easements across our land . they keep trees and
heavy brush cut back from the lines , and it's a perfect place to plant
wildflowers and other stuff . One of my best blackberry patches is in one of
the easements . Probably plant some stuff around the orchard too , I bought
a LOT of seeds for this project .
--
Snag


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Old 12-12-2014, 02:27 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All dead , all dead ...

On 12/10/2014 2:56 PM, Ecnerwal wrote:
Just recognize that wherever you plant horseradish, there will _always_
be horseradish. So be sure it's where you want it...and not too close to
anything else (or use a serious root barrier). It does not expand as
fast as mint, but it's almost impossible to ever get rid of.

Same thing goes for Jerusalem artichoke, aka Sunchokes. You would have
to burn the soil down two feet to get all the roots and, even then, the
damned things might come up again. We moved to get away from them. G

The garlic should be fine. I do about 50 (per person) myself. A dozen or
so of those 50 source the 50 plantings for the next year (only looking
for ~4-5 cloves per head on average so I can plant _only_ the larger
cloves in a head, selecting the larger heads for seed, and eat the rest
of those broken-up heads at planting time.)

Actually got mine in before Thanksgiving this year, but as Bird also
said, I've done anywhere from well into December (which was "some point
when the ground surface thawed again" on a very behind year) to planted
when dug (or not dug at all, though that's not ideal from a
rotation/pest standpoint) and it's been fine. One of the lower stress
things to grow, for the most part. The only time I have had issues is
with spring planting - that simply does not work, and I'm zone 4. The
stuff laughs at the cold, barring bizarre circumstances.

For bees, clovers are always a good option, monarda (bee balm) lives up
to that common name and also gets hummers if you use the red variety,
mints (also a weed that spreads vigorously, so again, be careful where
you put them) and thymes all do well. Lavender works well if you can get
it to grow reliably (better drainage than I have would help.)


Bees here are drawn to salvia flowers and then move on to pollinate our
vegetables. They also seem to really like basil flowers so we leave the
plants to flower just for the bees. I've never been able to get lavender
to grow, I guess it's just to wet here most of the time.

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Old 13-12-2014, 01:46 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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George Shirley wrote:
....
I've never been able to get lavender
to grow, I guess it's just to wet here most of the time.


even with our heavy clay soil we have a lot of
lavender here.

even in places that flood from time to time.

as long as it is propped up on a hillock or
in a bit of raised bed it seems to do just
fine.

the pathways surrounding it are often mulched
with crushed limestone here and it will often
start seedlings in that mulch. we're never short
of new plants to use elsewheres.

unfortunately, both of us are allergic to them
and so it makes it very hard for us to take care
of them very well. the bees and butterflies love
it though so it stays.


songbird


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