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Old 12-08-2017, 04:18 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 36
Default Rain, and lots of it

On 8/10/2017 6:44 AM, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/9/2017 10:50 PM, Muggles wrote:
On 8/9/2017 4:01 PM, songbird wrote:
Muggles wrote:
...
I've never had any fruit worth eating when I planted cantaloupes.
Maybe, I just haven't figured out the trick to growing them, yet? LOL

are you in the south?

i'm thinking that if you start the plants
indoors early enough you can get a better
start on them and perhaps the stems can
be more resistant to the bugs then...

might be worth a try.


songbird


Come January or February I get the bug to start plants, and we have a
small greenhouse, too, but it's not finished, yet. I have lots of
intentions of doing all sorts of things, but then way-layed by real life!

My wife takes care of the small lawn and the small raised bed gardens
and also, her churches "Poor" garden, which is much more prolific then
our garden. She harvested a bushel of Longhorn okra yesterday and we had
fried okra for dinner, the rest went to the Poor Pantry. Seems the folks
that go there for food like okra too.

The church garden has been operating over thirty years now and all the
refuse going back into the soil makes it really rich soil. The church
has a state of the art composter and the whole place gets mowed every
week plus all the detritus from the poor pantry.

We get three newspapers a week and they get shredded after reading and
go into our composter along with the kitchen cleanings so we're slowly
turning our raised beds into fertile soil. Funny thing, one cantaloupe
was growing in a corner of the bed, it had two flat sides and one round
side but was still edible. I'm thinking of making a square box for
another fruit to grow in. The great grands would get a kick out of a
square cantaloupe. G

George


LOL sounds like fun!

--
Maggie

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Old 12-08-2017, 01:32 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 139
Default Rain, and lots of it

On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 10:30:42 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/10/2017 9:09 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 7:44:10 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/9/2017 10:50 PM, Muggles wrote:
On 8/9/2017 4:01 PM, songbird wrote:
Muggles wrote:
...
I've never had any fruit worth eating when I planted cantaloupes.
Maybe, I just haven't figured out the trick to growing them, yet? LOL

are you in the south?

i'm thinking that if you start the plants
indoors early enough you can get a better
start on them and perhaps the stems can
be more resistant to the bugs then...

might be worth a try.


songbird


Come January or February I get the bug to start plants, and we have a
small greenhouse, too, but it's not finished, yet. I have lots of
intentions of doing all sorts of things, but then way-layed by real life!

My wife takes care of the small lawn and the small raised bed gardens
and also, her churches "Poor" garden, which is much more prolific then
our garden. She harvested a bushel of Longhorn okra yesterday and we had
fried okra for dinner, the rest went to the Poor Pantry. Seems the folks
that go there for food like okra too.

The church garden has been operating over thirty years now and all the
refuse going back into the soil makes it really rich soil. The church
has a state of the art composter and the whole place gets mowed every
week plus all the detritus from the poor pantry.

We get three newspapers a week and they get shredded after reading and
go into our composter along with the kitchen cleanings so we're slowly
turning our raised beds into fertile soil. Funny thing, one cantaloupe
was growing in a corner of the bed, it had two flat sides and one round
side but was still edible. I'm thinking of making a square box for
another fruit to grow in. The great grands would get a kick out of a
square cantaloupe. G

George


I built a box to fit around one of my Red October pumpkins in hopes of getting a cubic pumpkin.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

I'll post the results here in a couple of months. I'd like to build a dodecahedron box but that's a project for the coming winter.

Paul

I had a friend, now deceased, who put a six inch wide plastic pipe over
a watermelon and let it grow in the pipe. Was a very strange melon but
it was tasty and he cut it in rounds so it was also funny.

I suspect that many "strange" gardeners have done those things just for
the helluva it.

George


I may try that next year. How did he get the watermelon out of the pipe? Did it just slide out?

Paul
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Old 12-08-2017, 03:06 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2014
Posts: 755
Default Rain, and lots of it

On 8/12/2017 7:32 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 10:30:42 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/10/2017 9:09 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 7:44:10 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/9/2017 10:50 PM, Muggles wrote:
On 8/9/2017 4:01 PM, songbird wrote:
Muggles wrote:
...
I've never had any fruit worth eating when I planted cantaloupes.
Maybe, I just haven't figured out the trick to growing them, yet? LOL

are you in the south?

i'm thinking that if you start the plants
indoors early enough you can get a better
start on them and perhaps the stems can
be more resistant to the bugs then...

might be worth a try.


songbird


Come January or February I get the bug to start plants, and we have a
small greenhouse, too, but it's not finished, yet. I have lots of
intentions of doing all sorts of things, but then way-layed by real life!

My wife takes care of the small lawn and the small raised bed gardens
and also, her churches "Poor" garden, which is much more prolific then
our garden. She harvested a bushel of Longhorn okra yesterday and we had
fried okra for dinner, the rest went to the Poor Pantry. Seems the folks
that go there for food like okra too.

The church garden has been operating over thirty years now and all the
refuse going back into the soil makes it really rich soil. The church
has a state of the art composter and the whole place gets mowed every
week plus all the detritus from the poor pantry.

We get three newspapers a week and they get shredded after reading and
go into our composter along with the kitchen cleanings so we're slowly
turning our raised beds into fertile soil. Funny thing, one cantaloupe
was growing in a corner of the bed, it had two flat sides and one round
side but was still edible. I'm thinking of making a square box for
another fruit to grow in. The great grands would get a kick out of a
square cantaloupe. G

George

I built a box to fit around one of my Red October pumpkins in hopes of getting a cubic pumpkin.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

I'll post the results here in a couple of months. I'd like to build a dodecahedron box but that's a project for the coming winter.

Paul

I had a friend, now deceased, who put a six inch wide plastic pipe over
a watermelon and let it grow in the pipe. Was a very strange melon but
it was tasty and he cut it in rounds so it was also funny.

I suspect that many "strange" gardeners have done those things just for
the helluva it.

George


I may try that next year. How did he get the watermelon out of the pipe? Did it just slide out?

Paul

He cut the pipe down the length on two sides and popped it out. I didn't
see the part where he got it out but I did see the melon and actually
ate some of it. I don't think he did it again though. He was a quirky
kind of guy who, unfortunately, died sooner than he should have. I still
have good memories of some of the things he tried with his vegetable
garden.

George
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Old 13-08-2017, 01:19 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 139
Default Rain, and lots of it

On Saturday, August 12, 2017 at 10:06:12 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/12/2017 7:32 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 10:30:42 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/10/2017 9:09 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 7:44:10 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/9/2017 10:50 PM, Muggles wrote:
On 8/9/2017 4:01 PM, songbird wrote:
Muggles wrote:
...
I've never had any fruit worth eating when I planted cantaloupes.
Maybe, I just haven't figured out the trick to growing them, yet? LOL

are you in the south?

i'm thinking that if you start the plants
indoors early enough you can get a better
start on them and perhaps the stems can
be more resistant to the bugs then...

might be worth a try.


songbird


Come January or February I get the bug to start plants, and we have a
small greenhouse, too, but it's not finished, yet. I have lots of
intentions of doing all sorts of things, but then way-layed by real life!

My wife takes care of the small lawn and the small raised bed gardens
and also, her churches "Poor" garden, which is much more prolific then
our garden. She harvested a bushel of Longhorn okra yesterday and we had
fried okra for dinner, the rest went to the Poor Pantry. Seems the folks
that go there for food like okra too.

The church garden has been operating over thirty years now and all the
refuse going back into the soil makes it really rich soil. The church
has a state of the art composter and the whole place gets mowed every
week plus all the detritus from the poor pantry.

We get three newspapers a week and they get shredded after reading and
go into our composter along with the kitchen cleanings so we're slowly
turning our raised beds into fertile soil. Funny thing, one cantaloupe
was growing in a corner of the bed, it had two flat sides and one round
side but was still edible. I'm thinking of making a square box for
another fruit to grow in. The great grands would get a kick out of a
square cantaloupe. G

George

I built a box to fit around one of my Red October pumpkins in hopes of getting a cubic pumpkin.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

I'll post the results here in a couple of months. I'd like to build a dodecahedron box but that's a project for the coming winter.

Paul

I had a friend, now deceased, who put a six inch wide plastic pipe over
a watermelon and let it grow in the pipe. Was a very strange melon but
it was tasty and he cut it in rounds so it was also funny.

I suspect that many "strange" gardeners have done those things just for
the helluva it.

George


I may try that next year. How did he get the watermelon out of the pipe? Did it just slide out?

Paul

He cut the pipe down the length on two sides and popped it out. I didn't
see the part where he got it out but I did see the melon and actually
ate some of it. I don't think he did it again though. He was a quirky
kind of guy who, unfortunately, died sooner than he should have. I still
have good memories of some of the things he tried with his vegetable
garden.

George


I was thinking of cutting the pipe into two sections, lengthwise, and using large hose clamps to hold it together during growing season. It could then be disassembled without risking damage to the melon.

Paul
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Old 13-08-2017, 02:24 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2014
Posts: 755
Default Rain, and lots of it

On 8/13/2017 7:19 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Saturday, August 12, 2017 at 10:06:12 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/12/2017 7:32 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 10:30:42 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/10/2017 9:09 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 7:44:10 AM UTC-4, George Shirley wrote:
On 8/9/2017 10:50 PM, Muggles wrote:
On 8/9/2017 4:01 PM, songbird wrote:
Muggles wrote:
...
I've never had any fruit worth eating when I planted cantaloupes.
Maybe, I just haven't figured out the trick to growing them, yet? LOL

are you in the south?

i'm thinking that if you start the plants
indoors early enough you can get a better
start on them and perhaps the stems can
be more resistant to the bugs then...

might be worth a try.


songbird


Come January or February I get the bug to start plants, and we have a
small greenhouse, too, but it's not finished, yet. I have lots of
intentions of doing all sorts of things, but then way-layed by real life!

My wife takes care of the small lawn and the small raised bed gardens
and also, her churches "Poor" garden, which is much more prolific then
our garden. She harvested a bushel of Longhorn okra yesterday and we had
fried okra for dinner, the rest went to the Poor Pantry. Seems the folks
that go there for food like okra too.

The church garden has been operating over thirty years now and all the
refuse going back into the soil makes it really rich soil. The church
has a state of the art composter and the whole place gets mowed every
week plus all the detritus from the poor pantry.

We get three newspapers a week and they get shredded after reading and
go into our composter along with the kitchen cleanings so we're slowly
turning our raised beds into fertile soil. Funny thing, one cantaloupe
was growing in a corner of the bed, it had two flat sides and one round
side but was still edible. I'm thinking of making a square box for
another fruit to grow in. The great grands would get a kick out of a
square cantaloupe. G

George

I built a box to fit around one of my Red October pumpkins in hopes of getting a cubic pumpkin.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

I'll post the results here in a couple of months. I'd like to build a dodecahedron box but that's a project for the coming winter.

Paul

I had a friend, now deceased, who put a six inch wide plastic pipe over
a watermelon and let it grow in the pipe. Was a very strange melon but
it was tasty and he cut it in rounds so it was also funny.

I suspect that many "strange" gardeners have done those things just for
the helluva it.

George

I may try that next year. How did he get the watermelon out of the pipe? Did it just slide out?

Paul

He cut the pipe down the length on two sides and popped it out. I didn't
see the part where he got it out but I did see the melon and actually
ate some of it. I don't think he did it again though. He was a quirky
kind of guy who, unfortunately, died sooner than he should have. I still
have good memories of some of the things he tried with his vegetable
garden.

George


I was thinking of cutting the pipe into two sections, lengthwise, and using large hose clamps to hold it together during growing season. It could then be disassembled without risking damage to the melon.

Paul

He obviously didn't think of that, nor did I. Your version will be much
easier to get the melon out without destroying it. Do it and post a
picture here and we will all get a good laugh. Most gardeners do quirky
things from time to time. Like the lemon tree I grew years ago and
wrapped it around a six inch diameter post to get it started. I grew
well and gave us fruit for several years until a hurricane blew a lot of
stuff away but we still had the house. This was in Louisiana and
everyone there knew how to protect a house but not so much for fruit
trees in a bucket. G

In our long marriage we have had a rabbitry, both for eating the meat
but also showing around Texas. We had milk goats, a milk cow, lots of
chickens, ducks, pigeons, if it was edible we would grow it and eat it.
At our age now we don't miss the ten acres back then. We also have
strict restrictions here or I would build a pigeon coop and have some
nice bird meat occasionally. Pigeon's and Muscovy ducks fly wild around
here plus the Aztec dove, a critter out of Mexico and is open season on
all three.

For some reason all these people here just want to go to work, come home
in the evening and don't want anything going on. In addition the HOA
President is a Damned Yankee from up state New York. If the boss lady
would let me I would move us a little further out in the country side
here in Harris County, Texas. We senior citizens, maybe a half a dozen,
have no say so in what is good or not. Most of these folks worry more
about losing the value of their homes. We old people bought our house
outright and can sell them outright if needed. Folks come and go here
like folks go to the grocery. Seems every other week we get an email
about selling furniture, cars, etc. I suspect there are a lot of
divorces going on. There are several old couples like us and another
amount of widows.


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