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Old 08-01-2018, 06:10 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:
....
My bad. I will keep looking to see if I can find
nutrition data on them by themselves.


i looked for a bit today and could not find
anything clearly marked for that particular
squash, but i would not be too surprised if
it is similar in nutrition as zukes or any of
the other summer squash.


songbird

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Old 09-01-2018, 01:15 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 01/07/2018 10:10 PM, songbird wrote:
i would not be too surprised if
it is similar in nutrition as zukes or any of
the other summer squash.


You are correct. All summer squash are basically the
same. Winter squash, on the other hand, are toxic to
diabetics.
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Old 09-01-2018, 02:05 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Mon, 8 Jan 2018 17:15:24 -0800, T wrote:

On 01/07/2018 10:10 PM, songbird wrote:
i would not be too surprised if
it is similar in nutrition as zukes or any of
the other summer squash.


You are correct. All summer squash are basically the
same. Winter squash, on the other hand, are toxic to
diabetics.



Please stop your nonsense.

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutriti...winter-squash/
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Old 09-01-2018, 05:55 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 01/08/2018 06:05 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Mon, 8 Jan 2018 17:15:24 -0800, T wrote:

On 01/07/2018 10:10 PM, songbird wrote:
i would not be too surprised if
it is similar in nutrition as zukes or any of
the other summer squash.


You are correct. All summer squash are basically the
same. Winter squash, on the other hand, are toxic to
diabetics.



Please stop your nonsense.

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutriti...winter-squash/


Hi Boron,

I read what the guy said about winter squash in your link.
I am sorry, but what an idiot.

I am not risking my feet falling off.

Here are some numbers for Acorn squash:

Squash, winter, acorn, cooked, baked, without salt:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/2645/2


Here is his example of Butternut Squash that he touted
for diabetics:

Squash, winter, butternut, cooked, baked, without salt

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/2648/2

1 cups cubes (205g)
Glycemic load 8
Total Carbohydrate 21.5g


For a T2 Diabetic, here are the rules:

Glycemic load: 10 total per day
carbs: 15 max per meal (7 for hard cases, no borrowing)
60 total per day (30 for hard cases)

To heal from Carbohydrate Poisoning (T2 Diabetes), you have
to return to some semblance of what our ancestors ate.
That would be Primal or Paleo of somewhere in between.

For a Drug Free Diabetic or any diabetic for that matter,
you'd be an absolute fool to eat winter squash. Humans
are not designed to eat anything that has been artificially
hybridized to contain unnatural level of carbohydrates
NOT FOUND in nature.

After you get over the carbohydrate addiction,
your taste returns and the food is so good you have to
be careful not to eat too much. (I was up to 4000 calories
a day!)

Or you can stay addicted and go the carb and drug route.
The medical establishment and Big Parma makes a ton
of money off of T2 committing suicide on the installment
programs.

The conflict of interest is something to behold.
You saw a good example of it in the link you sent me,
especially the part about a low glycemic load.
The writer of that article should be ashamed of themselves.

I am three years drug free. I am thriving, not just
surviving.

-T

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Old 09-01-2018, 04:48 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Mon, 8 Jan 2018 21:55:50 -0800, T wrote:

On 01/08/2018 06:05 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Mon, 8 Jan 2018 17:15:24 -0800, T wrote:

On 01/07/2018 10:10 PM, songbird wrote:
i would not be too surprised if
it is similar in nutrition as zukes or any of
the other summer squash.

You are correct. All summer squash are basically the
same. Winter squash, on the other hand, are toxic to
diabetics.



Please stop your nonsense.

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutriti...winter-squash/


Hi Boron,




For a T2 Diabetic, here are the rules:

Glycemic load: 10 total per day
carbs: 15 max per meal (7 for hard cases, no borrowing)
60 total per day (30 for hard cases)

To heal from Carbohydrate Poisoning (T2 Diabetes), you have
to return to some semblance of what our ancestors ate.
That would be Primal or Paleo of somewhere in between.


Bullshit. Sorry,but this idiocy and misinformation you post earn you a
rare spot in the KF.

Talk about fake news.




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Old 09-01-2018, 11:29 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 01/09/2018 08:48 AM, Boron wrote:
On Mon, 8 Jan 2018 21:55:50 -0800, T wrote:

On 01/08/2018 06:05 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Mon, 8 Jan 2018 17:15:24 -0800, T wrote:

On 01/07/2018 10:10 PM, songbird wrote:
i would not be too surprised if
it is similar in nutrition as zukes or any of
the other summer squash.

You are correct. All summer squash are basically the
same. Winter squash, on the other hand, are toxic to
diabetics.


Please stop your nonsense.

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutriti...winter-squash/


Hi Boron,




For a T2 Diabetic, here are the rules:

Glycemic load: 10 total per day
carbs: 15 max per meal (7 for hard cases, no borrowing)
60 total per day (30 for hard cases)

To heal from Carbohydrate Poisoning (T2 Diabetes), you have
to return to some semblance of what our ancestors ate.
That would be Primal or Paleo of somewhere in between.


Bullshit. Sorry,but this idiocy and misinformation you post earn you a
rare spot in the KF.

Talk about fake news.



And now we know why one out of eleven of us have
T2 Diabetes, when it use to be relatively unheard of.
We are being poisoned by an unnatural diet.

I stand behind everything I said.


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Old 26-02-2018, 10:47 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 12/18/2017 04:51 AM, songbird wrote:
just reading along in another forum and
came across this and thought i would post it
here for T.

Tromboncino (a.k.a Zucchetta Rampicante)

a very long squash, can be harvested young
and used like zukes, but also runs a long vine
which will root at the junctions so it is
resistant to squash borer damage.

if left to grow long it also is a winter
squash. once it hits seed stage the vine
will stop producing so have to keep it picked.


songbird


Hi Songbird,

Yup it is a summer squash and definitely on a T2's menu!
70 days to fruit.

https://www.rareseeds.com/zucchino-rampicante-squash/

The reviews mentioned "borers" left it alone as
you mentioned. Now for one squash bugs leave alone!

I have been growing ronde de nice, which are 50 days to fruit.

https://www.rareseeds.com/ronde-de-nice-squa/

I am not sure with the very short growing season, that I
would be successful at 70 days. My 70 day + peppers
only give me one picking before the freeze.

Thank you!

-T
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Old 28-02-2018, 12:43 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:
....
https://www.rareseeds.com/zucchino-rampicante-squash/

The reviews mentioned "borers" left it alone as
you mentioned. Now for one squash bugs leave alone!

I have been growing ronde de nice, which are 50 days to fruit.

https://www.rareseeds.com/ronde-de-nice-squa/

I am not sure with the very short growing season, that I
would be successful at 70 days. My 70 day + peppers
only give me one picking before the freeze.


we always plant our peppers from starts which the
greenhouse takes care of. our season is probably
about as long as yours here and we have plenty of
peppers (several rounds). just depends upon the
late storms or early frosts as to how many we get.
last year i was picking peppers pretty late in the
season (into October) as we didn't have any hard
enough frosts to knock out the plants completely.

for me red peppers have replaced tomatoes and i
stock the freezer pretty well with roasted red
peppers that i can use in other things eventually.


songbird
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Old 28-02-2018, 07:07 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 02/28/2018 04:43 AM, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
https://www.rareseeds.com/zucchino-rampicante-squash/

The reviews mentioned "borers" left it alone as
you mentioned. Now for one squash bugs leave alone!

I have been growing ronde de nice, which are 50 days to fruit.

https://www.rareseeds.com/ronde-de-nice-squa/

I am not sure with the very short growing season, that I
would be successful at 70 days. My 70 day + peppers
only give me one picking before the freeze.


we always plant our peppers from starts which the
greenhouse takes care of. our season is probably
about as long as yours here and we have plenty of
peppers (several rounds). just depends upon the
late storms or early frosts as to how many we get.
last year i was picking peppers pretty late in the
season (into October) as we didn't have any hard
enough frosts to knock out the plants completely.

for me red peppers have replaced tomatoes and i
stock the freezer pretty well with roasted red
peppers that i can use in other things eventually.


songbird


The only greenhouse pepper are ancho. And I get a
few off them. My favorites -- the new mexico red
variants -- I am lucky if I get one picking. I
have to grow them from seed.

What kind of red pepper do you grow?
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Old 01-03-2018, 11:08 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:
On 02/28/2018 04:43 AM, songbird wrote:

....
we always plant our peppers from starts which the
greenhouse takes care of. our season is probably
about as long as yours here and we have plenty of
peppers (several rounds). just depends upon the
late storms or early frosts as to how many we get.
last year i was picking peppers pretty late in the
season (into October) as we didn't have any hard
enough frosts to knock out the plants completely.

for me red peppers have replaced tomatoes and i
stock the freezer pretty well with roasted red
peppers that i can use in other things eventually.


The only greenhouse pepper are ancho. And I get a
few off them. My favorites -- the new mexico red
variants -- I am lucky if I get one picking. I
have to grow them from seed.

What kind of red pepper do you grow?


i've grown a few different kinds, one must be
generic enough as it is just labelled red pepper at
the greenhouse and it is shaped and sized about
the same as any green pepper i've had (usually
California Wonder is what we grow for green peppers
but these are not them because CW turns purple/brown
when it gets ripe here). the other type is called
Red Knight and it is an F1 hybrid and is supposed
to be red in 77 days, they get pretty big (sometimes
the size of both my fists put together). i can eat
several at a time.

that sounds about right for what i've got here
from them - seems mid-August until whenever the
hard frosts take them out.

none of what we grow is spicy/hot.


songbird


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Old 02-03-2018, 07:36 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 03/01/2018 03:08 PM, songbird wrote:
none of what we grow is spicy/hot.


That sucks!

Thank you for the education!
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Old 03-03-2018, 04:16 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:
On 03/01/2018 03:08 PM, songbird wrote:
none of what we grow is spicy/hot.


That sucks!


it's ok, i keep a bottle of sriracha sauce
handy and once in a while i make a pretty
hot green curry or red curry for me to eat
but i do that when Mom's away because she
won't eat it.

i'd rather grow things we both can eat as
that makes the best use of the space. here
or there i grow a few things that she won't
touch (turnips, radish sprouts, chard, ...).


Thank you for the education!


y.w.


songbird
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Old 03-03-2018, 05:11 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 03/02/2018 08:16 PM, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
On 03/01/2018 03:08 PM, songbird wrote:
none of what we grow is spicy/hot.


That sucks!


it's ok, i keep a bottle of sriracha sauce
handy and once in a while i make a pretty
hot green curry or red curry for me to eat
but i do that when Mom's away because she
won't eat it.

i'd rather grow things we both can eat as
that makes the best use of the space. here
or there i grow a few things that she won't
touch (turnips, radish sprouts, chard, ...).


Thank you for the education!


y.w.


songbird


tip: when things get too hot, add oil and/or grease.
Cheese works too as it is oily. Butter: yum!


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