Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 26-04-2018, 08:19 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 214
Default Long Term Gardening

Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's farm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what nuts are for, at least from the point of view of the trees.

Paul

  #2   Report Post  
Old 27-04-2018, 12:35 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2018
Posts: 12
Default Long Term Gardening

On Thursday, April 26, 2018 at 3:19:20 PM UTC-4, Pavel314 wrote:
Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's farm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what nuts are for, at least from the point of view of the trees.

Paul


Could be that squirrels got them.
  #3   Report Post  
Old 27-04-2018, 01:58 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2015
Posts: 220
Default Long Term Gardening

On 4/27/2018 7:35 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, April 26, 2018 at 3:19:20 PM UTC-4, Pavel314 wrote:
Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's farm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what nuts are for, at least from the point of view of the trees.

Paul


Could be that squirrels got them.


Maybe not planted correctly as I see husks should be removed first:

http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/...-black-walnut/

Takes decades to get mature producing trees, I see also.

I'm now contending with many type trees I planted over 40 years ago.

My Chinese chestnuts are mature and I get far more than I need. There
is a weevil problem I cannot eradicate and local market would not buy
them. I'll have friends over to pickup what they want. OP lucky to
have one that gives him nuts.

My experiment in trying to grow English walnuts failed. Squirrels would
eat the nuts green off the trees and we got essentially none. Then wind
took its toll and blew them down. I had last one removed last month.
  #5   Report Post  
Old 28-04-2018, 03:00 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 214
Default Long Term Gardening

On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 8:58:51 AM UTC-4, Frank wrote:
On 4/27/2018 7:35 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, April 26, 2018 at 3:19:20 PM UTC-4, Pavel314 wrote:
Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's farm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what nuts are for, at least from the point of view of the trees.

Paul


Could be that squirrels got them.


Maybe not planted correctly as I see husks should be removed first:

http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/...-black-walnut/

Takes decades to get mature producing trees, I see also.

I'm now contending with many type trees I planted over 40 years ago.

My Chinese chestnuts are mature and I get far more than I need. There
is a weevil problem I cannot eradicate and local market would not buy
them. I'll have friends over to pickup what they want. OP lucky to
have one that gives him nuts.

My experiment in trying to grow English walnuts failed. Squirrels would
eat the nuts green off the trees and we got essentially none. Then wind
took its toll and blew them down. I had last one removed last month.


Not sure about removing the husks. These trees are native to the area and grow in the wild, where nobody removes their husks. Maybe the squirrels remove them?


  #6   Report Post  
Old 02-05-2018, 08:44 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2018
Posts: 6
Default Long Term Gardening

On 4/27/2018 10:00 PM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 8:58:51 AM UTC-4, Frank wrote:
On 4/27/2018 7:35 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, April 26, 2018 at 3:19:20 PM UTC-4, Pavel314 wrote:
Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's farm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what nuts are for, at least from the point of view of the trees.

Paul

Could be that squirrels got them.


Maybe not planted correctly as I see husks should be removed first:

http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/...-black-walnut/

Takes decades to get mature producing trees, I see also.

I'm now contending with many type trees I planted over 40 years ago.

My Chinese chestnuts are mature and I get far more than I need. There
is a weevil problem I cannot eradicate and local market would not buy
them. I'll have friends over to pickup what they want. OP lucky to
have one that gives him nuts.

My experiment in trying to grow English walnuts failed. Squirrels would
eat the nuts green off the trees and we got essentially none. Then wind
took its toll and blew them down. I had last one removed last month.


Not sure about removing the husks. These trees are native to the area and grow in the wild, where nobody removes their husks. Maybe the squirrels remove them?


Husks flake off easily sometime after they have fallen and then
squirrels often bury nuts. That's why I was surprised that squirrels
were going after my green on the tree English walnuts.

I saw a squirrel eating a black walnut once and it must have taken a
half hour. Good thing their teeth keep growing as it took a lot of
gnawing. Squirrels probably go after the easy nuts first, like acorns,
then as food gets scarce go for things like black walnuts and Osage
Orange. Same with deer getting my ivy in the winter. Ivy is easy to
get but probably not as tasty as my chestnuts.
  #7   Report Post  
Old 06-05-2018, 03:01 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2012
Posts: 168
Default Long Term Gardening

In article
Pavel314 writes:
Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's
farm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than
she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight
in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at
least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what
nuts are for, at least from the point of view of the trees.


Be aware that Black Walnut interferes with lots of common garden
plants. The roots (and other parts) emit a substance called juglone
that reduces respiration.

If you want to garden near them, do some research as to which plants
are affected.

My vegetable garden is about 8 feet from a 2.5 foot wide walnut
stump (felled 4-6 years back). That side is still questionable for
tomatoes. It may remain so for another 20 years.

--
Drew Lawson | Savage bed foot-warmer
| of purest feline ancestry
| Look out little furry folk
| it's the all-night working cat
  #8   Report Post  
Old 07-05-2018, 02:54 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 214
Default Long Term Gardening

On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 10:02:01 PM UTC-4, Drew Lawson wrote:
In article
Pavel314 writes:
Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's
farm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than
she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight
in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at
least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what
nuts are for, at least from the point of view of the trees.


Be aware that Black Walnut interferes with lots of common garden
plants. The roots (and other parts) emit a substance called juglone
that reduces respiration.

If you want to garden near them, do some research as to which plants
are affected.

My vegetable garden is about 8 feet from a 2.5 foot wide walnut
stump (felled 4-6 years back). That side is still questionable for
tomatoes. It may remain so for another 20 years.

--
Drew Lawson | Savage bed foot-warmer
| of purest feline ancestry
| Look out little furry folk
| it's the all-night working cat


Thanks for the warning. I plan to transplant any that sprout to locations far from the garden.

Paul
  #9   Report Post  
Old 08-05-2018, 02:51 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2018
Posts: 12
Default Long Term Gardening

On Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 9:54:57 PM UTC-4, Pavel314 wrote:
On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 10:02:01 PM UTC-4, Drew Lawson wrote:
In article
Pavel314 writes:
Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's
farm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than
she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight
in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at
least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what
nuts are for, at least from the point of view of the trees.


Be aware that Black Walnut interferes with lots of common garden
plants. The roots (and other parts) emit a substance called juglone
that reduces respiration.

If you want to garden near them, do some research as to which plants
are affected.

My vegetable garden is about 8 feet from a 2.5 foot wide walnut
stump (felled 4-6 years back). That side is still questionable for
tomatoes. It may remain so for another 20 years.

--
Drew Lawson | Savage bed foot-warmer
| of purest feline ancestry
| Look out little furry folk
| it's the all-night working cat


Thanks for the warning. I plan to transplant any that sprout to locations far from the garden.

Paul


Transplant as soon as they sprout. They develop a long taproot very quickly.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brian E Long term absence Essjay001 United Kingdom 0 05-08-2003 11:33 PM
Long term absence Essjay001 United Kingdom 38 05-08-2003 10:23 PM
Brian E Long term absence Essjay001 United Kingdom 19 02-08-2003 02:02 PM
Long term changes in ground chemistry due to Vineyards Control sci.agriculture 8 03-06-2003 12:32 AM
Long term with sand/laterite mix substrate SteveG Freshwater Aquaria Plants 3 20-04-2003 06:17 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:05 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017