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Old 25-07-2018, 03:40 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default The plant Internet. What does it mean for us?

Hi All,

I saw a fascinating short documentary on how plants communicate:

The Earth's Internet: How Fungi Help Plants Communicate:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tjt8WT5mRs

It is 5:20 long.

The stinkers talk to each other!

So, by now all my Zukes should know about the squash bugs
and be taking preventative measures!

Anyway, what are the implications for us? Any changes
we should make in the way we plant things?

I have noticed that plants tend to like being close to their
own kind.

-T

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Old 26-07-2018, 01:28 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default The plant Internet. What does it mean for us?

T wrote:
Hi All,

I saw a fascinating short documentary on how plants communicate:

The Earth's Internet: How Fungi Help Plants Communicate:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tjt8WT5mRs

It is 5:20 long.

The stinkers talk to each other!

So, by now all my Zukes should know about the squash bugs
and be taking preventative measures!

Anyway, what are the implications for us? Any changes
we should make in the way we plant things?


study the differences between what perennials like
and what other plants like for soil/fungi/bacteria
it's pretty interesting.

the summary version (and of course there are exceptions)
is that perennials tend to do better in fungal dominated
soils (because the fungi break down any accumulated surface
debris) and most annuals (including many of the garden
vegetables) like soils more dominated by bacterial species.
of course there are plenty of each types in most places
that can support life, but it's a good quick rule of thumb.

almost all of the perennial flower gardens here are
mulched with wood chips of whatever kind we can get for
low cost. after some years of decomposition that's
turned into prime humus. run it through the worm buckets
to give it a good charge of worm/pee/poo and it's the
best fertilizer you'll ever get for a garden.


I have noticed that plants tend to like being close to their
own kind.


um, ... plants propagate mostly in proximity through
various means... some plants give off chemicals to
prevent their offspring from starting too close to the
parent (alfalfa is a good example) - always exceptions
to be found in nature. it's an interesting world we
live in...


songbird


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