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Old 21-03-2019, 04:19 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default EWG's 2019 Dirty Dozen list

On 3/20/2019 7:47 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

Of some mind interest: the Environmental Working Group's
2019 top dozen pesticide contaminated vegi's:


Kale rejoins the 'Dirty Dozen' list as one of the most contaminated with
pesticides:

https://www.foxbusiness.com/personal...ith-pesticides



1.* STRAWBERRIES
2.* SPINACH
3.* KALE
4.* NECTARINES
5.* APPLES
6.* GRAPES
7.* PEACHES
8.* CHERRIES
9.* PEARS
10. TOMATOES
11. CELERY
12. POTATOES


Is kale actually edible, even without the pesticides?

:-)

-T


I wonder about pronouncements from this activist group. This is first
opinion of what others think:

https://www.acsh.org/news/2017/05/25...orly-you-11323

As a long retired chemist I am amazed at improvements in analytic
chemistry to now find materials down to parts per trillion. Also as a
chemist I know that toxicity is dose related and presence of a
contaminant does not necessarily mean it can harm you.

As for kale, I knew nothing about it but noted today it was part of a
store mixed salad I had for lunch. By itself it would not be a good
salad but the mix was very tasty. I read that kale is loaded with
vitamins but when I was on Coumadin I would have avoided it for high
vitamin K content.



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Old 21-03-2019, 05:30 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default EWG's 2019 Dirty Dozen list


I wonder about pronouncements from this activist group.* This is first
opinion of what others think:

https://www.acsh.org/news/2017/05/25...orly-you-11323


As a long retired chemist I am amazed at improvements in analytic
chemistry to now find materials down to parts per trillion.* Also as a
chemist I know that toxicity is dose related and presence of a
contaminant does not necessarily mean it can harm you.


It can cut both ways; employed scientists are by definition in service
of the establishment; there are many historical examples of scientists
both parroting the message of their masters and self-censoring so as to
not rock the boat, appear too radical and thus jeopardize their career
prospects. Lastly, there is definitely a degree of arrogance in many of
the Sciences when it comes to what they think they know. In other
words, scientists are only human.

Upton Sinclair made a solid observation of this bias:

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary
depends on his not understanding it.”
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Old 21-03-2019, 05:42 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default EWG's 2019 Dirty Dozen list

On 3/21/19 9:19 AM, Frank wrote:
As a long retired chemist I am amazed at improvements in analytic


As for kale, I knew nothing about it but noted today it was part of a
store mixed salad I had for lunch.* By itself it would not be a good
salad but the mix was very tasty.* I read that kale is loaded with
vitamins but when I was on Coumadin I would have avoided it for high
vitamin*K*content.


To me, Kale tastes like penicillin flavored oak leaves. YUK!

It is indeed loaded with vitamins and stuff, but leaf lettuce
is 1/2 as much and I eat 4 times as much, so ...

Off Topic: Retired Chemist. I have to sit in other
peoples chairs to work on their computers. As a result,
my cloths get coated in perfume, with give my wife scary
asthma.

We use to be able to get perfume out by soaking it
in vinegar. But, now Tide and Dawn have come up with
perfumes that deliberately are meant to NOT wash out
and to persist for over a month. Here are some of them:

https://patents.google.com/patent/EP3218066A1/en
https://patents.google.com/patent/US5840668A/en
https://patents.google.com/patent/US5670466

Whilst we all wait for the massive class action suit to
stop this practice, do you know how to remove these
toxins? Vinegar, baking soda, washing soda, sodium
percarbonate (h2o2, Oxi), borate do not work. Enviro
Cleanse sort of kind of works, but not really.

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Old 21-03-2019, 05:56 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default EWG's 2019 Dirty Dozen list

On 3/21/19 9:19 AM, Frank wrote:
I wonder about pronouncements from this activist group.* This is first
opinion*of*what*others*think:


For those with chemical sensitivities, the EWG is a source
of information not available elsewhere.

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Old 21-03-2019, 06:02 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default EWG's 2019 Dirty Dozen list

On 3/21/19 10:30 AM, jeff wrote:
Upton Sinclair made a solid observation of this bias:

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary
depends on his not understanding it.”


Well stated.

Most studies now a days are pay for results. When you
read them, you go to the funding source first.

I remember a while back when a study showed an increased
survival rate for bypass patients when using foliates
and B vitamins. Then a year or so later, another study
came out that debunked it. Upon peer review of the second
study, it transpired that they used 1/20th the effective
dose of B vitamins. Hmmmmmm ...



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Old 21-03-2019, 10:14 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default EWG's 2019 Dirty Dozen list

On 3/21/2019 1:30 PM, jeff wrote:

I wonder about pronouncements from this activist group.* This is first
opinion of what others think:

https://www.acsh.org/news/2017/05/25...orly-you-11323


As a long retired chemist I am amazed at improvements in analytic
chemistry to now find materials down to parts per trillion.* Also as a
chemist I know that toxicity is dose related and presence of a
contaminant does not necessarily mean it can harm you.


It can cut both ways; employed scientists are by definition in service
of the establishment; there are many historical examples of scientists
both parroting the message of their masters and self-censoring so as to
not rock the boat, appear too radical and thus jeopardize their career
prospects. Lastly, there is definitely a degree of arrogance in many of
the Sciences when it comes to what they think they know. In other
words, scientists are only human.

Upton Sinclair made a solid observation of this bias:

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary
depends on his not understanding it.”


Very true. Scientists are not immune to these things.


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