#1   Report Post  
Old 24-03-2019, 12:53 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 231
Default Grow Tunnel

My wife planted some early lettuce and covered the rows with some long grow tunnels. These are plastic sheeting attached to hoops which are stuck into the ground; picture at link.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

These were fine until we had a couple of windy days, with wind gusts up to 40 m.p.h, at which point the one on the windward side was blown out of the ground.

Has anyone else tried these? If so, do you have any tricks to keep them from blowing away? I thought of putting up some sort of wind break, like a short fence, on the windward side, which is to the north and west so it wouldn't block the Sun.

Paul

  #2   Report Post  
Old 24-03-2019, 02:51 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2019
Posts: 1
Default Grow Tunnel

On 3/24/19 6:53 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
My wife planted some early lettuce and covered the rows with some long grow tunnels. These are plastic sheeting attached to hoops which are stuck into the ground; picture at link.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

These were fine until we had a couple of windy days, with wind gusts up to 40 m.p.h, at which point the one on the windward side was blown out of the ground.

Has anyone else tried these? If so, do you have any tricks to keep them from blowing away? I thought of putting up some sort of wind break, like a short fence, on the windward side, which is to the north and west so it wouldn't block the Sun.

Paul


I don't have any experience with grow tunnels however just looking at it
as a physics problem you basically have the bernoulli effect creating
upward lift. Maybe some deer fencing could be used as an overlay --
something that lets some light through -- and adds more staking points
along the length of the tunnels. Deer fencing isn't terribly spendy and
you can probably roll it back up an reuse several seasons.
  #3   Report Post  
Old 24-03-2019, 10:28 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2012
Posts: 180
Default Grow Tunnel

In article
Pavel314 writes:
My wife planted some early lettuce and covered the rows with some
long grow tunnels. These are plastic
sheeting attached to hoops which are stuck into the ground; picture at link.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

These were fine until we had a couple of windy days, with wind
gusts up to 40 m.p.h, at which point
the one on the windward side was blown out of the ground.


It is hard to tell from that picture, but how is the sheeting
anchored along the length? I haven't used these, but normally see
the suggestion to bury the edge an possibly add extra weight (like
rocks or bricks).


--
Drew Lawson

I only came in search of answers, never planned to sell my soul
I only came in search of something left that I could call my own
  #4   Report Post  
Old 25-03-2019, 01:31 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 231
Default Grow Tunnel

On Sunday, March 24, 2019 at 6:28:19 PM UTC-4, Drew Lawson wrote:
In article
Pavel314 writes:
My wife planted some early lettuce and covered the rows with some
long grow tunnels. These are plastic
sheeting attached to hoops which are stuck into the ground; picture at link.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

These were fine until we had a couple of windy days, with wind
gusts up to 40 m.p.h, at which point
the one on the windward side was blown out of the ground.


It is hard to tell from that picture, but how is the sheeting
anchored along the length? I haven't used these, but normally see
the suggestion to bury the edge an possibly add extra weight (like
rocks or bricks).


--
Drew Lawson

I only came in search of answers, never planned to sell my soul
I only came in search of something left that I could call my own


No anchoring along the edge, it just rests on the ground. Not enough excess for rocks, unfortunately. I think I'll try covering the whole thing with wire fencing, which I have a roll of out back, and weight the fencing with rocks.

Paul
  #5   Report Post  
Old 25-03-2019, 02:24 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2016
Posts: 46
Default Grow Tunnel


My wife planted some early lettuce and covered the rows with some
long grow tunnels. These are plastic
sheeting attached to hoops which are stuck into the ground; picture at link.
http://tinyurl.com/yx93hvun
These were fine until we had a couple of windy days, with wind
gusts up to 40 m.p.h, at which point
the one on the windward side was blown out of the ground.


It is hard to tell from that picture, but how is the sheeting
anchored along the length? I haven't used these, but normally see
the suggestion to bury the edge an possibly add extra weight (like
rocks or bricks).


No anchoring along the edge, it just rests on the ground.
Not enough excess for rocks, unfortunately. I think I'll try covering
the whole thing with wire fencing, which I have a roll of out back,
and weight the fencing with rocks.
Paul



This one is secured with ground stakes :

http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/p...87&cat=2,33141

I would think that fencing would make it difficult to tend ?

John T.



  #6   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2019, 11:42 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 7
Default Grow Tunnel

On Sunday, March 24, 2019 at 8:53:48 AM UTC-4, Pavel314 wrote:
My wife planted some early lettuce and covered the rows with some long grow tunnels. These are plastic sheeting attached to hoops which are stuck into the ground; picture at link.

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...g.html?filters[user]=136208277&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0

These were fine until we had a couple of windy days, with wind gusts up to 40 m.p.h, at which point the one on the windward side was blown out of the ground.

Has anyone else tried these? If so, do you have any tricks to keep them from blowing away? I thought of putting up some sort of wind break, like a short fence, on the windward side, which is to the north and west so it wouldn't block the Sun.

Paul


Those look about as long as mine but thinner, I use 2 4x8 bricks midway and 3 at each end. I use concrete reinforcement wire to hold it up.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
poly tunnel Kate Morgan United Kingdom 20 22-04-2011 12:36 PM
Channel Tunnel Rail Link work finally starts C. Dewick Ponds 0 25-12-2007 07:00 PM
Need help as have rodent tunnel system under veggie garden Fitz Grips Gardening 13 18-10-2004 11:49 AM
Carpel Tunnel Syndrome Iris Cohen Plant Science 0 09-11-2003 01:23 AM
[IBC] Poly Tunnel Covering audgen Bonsai 1 13-04-2003 06:32 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:43 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017