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T[_4_] 28-06-2019 12:51 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
Hi All,

I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant. This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.

I have been using this rooting compound:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

And it does not seem to work. Three failure so far.

Am I using the wrong stuff?

Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole. Did I miss something?

Many thanks,
-T

Terry Coombs 28-06-2019 01:09 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 6/27/2019 6:51 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant.┬* This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.

I have been using this rooting compound:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


And it does not seem to work.┬* Three failure so far.

Am I using the wrong stuff?

Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole.┬* Did I miss something?

Many thanks,
-T


┬* Just a guess , but I think you might be using too much rooting
hormone . The instructions on mine (TakeRoot brand) say dip then shake
excess off . Are you clipping almost all the leaves off ? That lowers
the moisture requirements , cuz remember , ya got no roots to take up
water and nutrients . I also put a baggie over the container (loosely)
to help retain moisture .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !


songbird[_2_] 28-06-2019 02:27 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
Terry Coombs wrote:
On 6/27/2019 6:51 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant.┬* This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.

I have been using this rooting compound:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


And it does not seem to work.┬* Three failure so far.

Am I using the wrong stuff?

Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole.┬* Did I miss something?


┬* Just a guess , but I think you might be using too much rooting
hormone . The instructions on mine (TakeRoot brand) say dip then shake
excess off . Are you clipping almost all the leaves off ? That lowers
the moisture requirements , cuz remember , ya got no roots to take up
water and nutrients . I also put a baggie over the container (loosely)
to help retain moisture .


it also depends upon how the cutting that is trying
to be rooted is treated. it should not be left in
the hot sun or allowed to dry out. it should be kept
moist but not soggy. etc.


songbird

T[_4_] 28-06-2019 08:30 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 6/27/19 5:09 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:
Just a guess , but I think you might be using too much rooting hormone .


Tried it both ways.

The instructions on mine (TakeRoot brand) say dip then shake excess off
. Are you clipping almost all the leaves off ?


I left the leaves on. Should I have removed most of them?


That lowers the moisture
requirements , cuz remember , ya got no roots to take up water and
nutrients .


I also put a baggie over the container (loosely)
to┬*help┬*retain┬*moisture┬*.


not following. Bag over the rooting compound container?


Also, how long do I wait to water? Maybe I washed the stuff off?


Terry Coombs 29-06-2019 01:17 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 6/28/2019 2:30 PM, T wrote:
On 6/27/19 5:09 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:
Just a guess , but I think you might be using too much rooting hormone .


Tried it both ways.

The instructions on mine (TakeRoot brand) say dip then shake excess
off . Are you clipping almost all the leaves off ?


I left the leaves on.┬* Should I have removed most of them?


┬* Yes , all but a couple or 3 . They lose moisture to the air┬* and the
plant has no way to replace it until it grows some roots .



That lowers the moisture requirements , cuz remember , ya got no
roots to take up water and nutrients .


I also put a baggie over the container (loosely)
to┬*help┬*retain┬*moisture┬*.


not following.┬* Bag over the rooting compound container?


┬* No , a baggie placed loosely over the pot you use for your new plant
.. Like a little tent .




Also, how long do I wait to water?┬* Maybe I washed the stuff off?


┬* I soak the soil as soon as I plant the new start . After that I water
just enough to keep the soil damp .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !


T[_4_] 29-06-2019 02:15 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 6/28/19 5:17 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 6/28/2019 2:30 PM, T wrote:
On 6/27/19 5:09 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:
Just a guess , but I think you might be using too much rooting hormone .


Tried it both ways.

The instructions on mine (TakeRoot brand) say dip then shake excess
off . Are you clipping almost all the leaves off ?


I left the leaves on.┬* Should I have removed most of them?


┬* Yes , all but a couple or 3 . They lose moisture to the air┬* and the
plant has no way to replace it until it grows some roots .



That lowers the moisture requirements , cuz remember , ya got no
roots to take up water and nutrients .


I also put a baggie over the container (loosely)
to┬*help┬*retain┬*moisture┬*.


not following.┬* Bag over the rooting compound container?


┬* No , a baggie placed loosely over the pot you use for your new plant
. Like a little tent .




Also, how long do I wait to water?┬* Maybe I washed the stuff off?


┬* I soak the soil as soon as I plant the new start . After that I water
just enough to keep the soil damp .


Thank you!


Drew Lawson[_2_] 29-06-2019 03:00 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
In article
T writes:
On 6/27/19 5:09 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:
Just a guess , but I think you might be using too much rooting hormone .


Tried it both ways.

The instructions on mine (TakeRoot brand) say dip then shake excess off
. Are you clipping almost all the leaves off ?


I left the leaves on. Should I have removed most of them?


Hard to phrase the balance. You need enough to feed the root growth.
But any more than that demands more water than the cut end can wick.
For me, it is hit and miss. I generally take 4-5 cuttings when I
want 1-2 plants (for woody plants, greens are easier).

That lowers the moisture
requirements , cuz remember , ya got no roots to take up water and
nutrients .


I also put a baggie over the container (loosely)
to┬*help┬*retain┬*moisture┬*.


not following. Bag over the rooting compound container?


Tent over the plant/cutting. Like a mini-greenhouse.

Also, how long do I wait to water? Maybe I washed the stuff off?


I've never rooted cuttings in the ground. Usually use damp sand
until roots form, and water by soaking from the bottom.

I'd say keep the soil damp, and any watering would be slow/gentle.

--
Drew Lawson

I only came in search of answers, never planned to sell my soul
I only came in search of something left that I could call my own

T[_4_] 29-06-2019 03:04 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 6/28/19 7:00 PM, Drew Lawson wrote:
In article
T writes:
On 6/27/19 5:09 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:
Just a guess , but I think you might be using too much rooting hormone .


Tried it both ways.

The instructions on mine (TakeRoot brand) say dip then shake excess off
. Are you clipping almost all the leaves off ?


I left the leaves on. Should I have removed most of them?


Hard to phrase the balance. You need enough to feed the root growth.
But any more than that demands more water than the cut end can wick.
For me, it is hit and miss. I generally take 4-5 cuttings when I
want 1-2 plants (for woody plants, greens are easier).

That lowers the moisture
requirements , cuz remember , ya got no roots to take up water and
nutrients .


I also put a baggie over the container (loosely)
to├é┬*help├é┬*retain├é┬*moisture├é┬*.


not following. Bag over the rooting compound container?


Tent over the plant/cutting. Like a mini-greenhouse.

Also, how long do I wait to water? Maybe I washed the stuff off?


I've never rooted cuttings in the ground. Usually use damp sand
until roots form, and water by soaking from the bottom.

I'd say keep the soil damp, and any watering would be slow/gentle.



Thank you!


T[_4_] 29-06-2019 09:24 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 6/27/19 4:51 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant.┬* This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.

I have been using this rooting compound:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


And it does not seem to work.┬* Three failure so far.

Am I using the wrong stuff?

Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole.┬* Did I miss something?

Many thanks,
-T




Ooopps. That was suppose to go to rec.gardens.edible.
Please disregard


songbird[_2_] 29-06-2019 04:41 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
Drew Lawson wrote:
....
I've never rooted cuttings in the ground. Usually use damp sand
until roots form, and water by soaking from the bottom.

I'd say keep the soil damp, and any watering would be slow/gentle.


yeah, you don't want to wash away the rooting
horemone...


songbird

T[_4_] 13-07-2019 12:49 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 6/27/19 4:51 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant.┬* This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.

I have been using this rooting compound:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


And it does not seem to work.┬* Three failure so far.

Am I using the wrong stuff?

Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole.┬* Did I miss something?

Many thanks,
-T


Hi All,

I am trying again.

This time, I cut all the leaves off but three.
Dunked the stem in the rooting compound and only
added a tiny bit to the hole. And only gave it
about 1/4 cups of water so as to not wash off
the compound.

The three leaves are now dead, but it look like it is
trying to sprout new leaves along its stem.

And I am back to watering it normally again.

Time will tell!

Thank you all for the help!
-T


songbird[_2_] 13-07-2019 02:00 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
T wrote:
....
This time, I cut all the leaves off but three.
Dunked the stem in the rooting compound and only
added a tiny bit to the hole. And only gave it
about 1/4 cups of water so as to not wash off
the compound.


you should not need to put any down the hole.
just FYI for future efforts. :)


The three leaves are now dead, but it look like it is
trying to sprout new leaves along its stem.


when you see new growth that is usually a
good sign that new roots have formed.

one or two leaves is usually enough.


And I am back to watering it normally again.

Time will tell!

Thank you all for the help!


:)


songbird

T[_4_] 13-07-2019 03:20 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 7/12/19 6:00 PM, songbird wrote:

when you see new growth that is usually a
good sign that new roots have formed.

one or two leaves is usually enough.


This all reminds me of what my brother i law said about
cooking: "Hand me the can; hand me the can opener; I
am a cook!"

When I taught myself to cook seven years ago when I
got diagnosed with T2, Oh boy! What look easy on the
outside really required a lot of learning and skills.
AND I DON'T COOK OUT OF CANS!

Fresh garden produce is to die for! Yum! I am
finally starting to see some results.



Hul Tytus 14-07-2019 09:23 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
I've had good luck in the winter by sticking the clippings in coke
bottles kept full with water and placing them in a south facing window.
When roots are noticeable & the weather is warm, stick them in the ground.

Hul

T wrote:
Hi All,


I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant. This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.


I have been using this rooting compound:


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


And it does not seem to work. Three failure so far.


Am I using the wrong stuff?


Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole. Did I miss something?


Many thanks,
-T


T[_4_] 14-07-2019 11:23 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 7/14/19 1:23 PM, Hul Tytus wrote:
I've had good luck in the winter by sticking the clippings in coke
bottles kept full with water and placing them in a south facing window.
When roots are noticeable & the weather is warm, stick them in the ground.

Hul


Interesting! Thank you!

T[_4_] 14-08-2019 05:58 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 7/14/19 1:23 PM, Hul Tytus wrote:
I've had good luck in the winter by sticking the clippings in coke
bottles kept full with water and placing them in a south facing window.
When roots are noticeable & the weather is warm, stick them in the ground.

Hul


Hi Hul,

Well now, this time I tried sticking a clipping into
an empty bottle, with a tiny amount of rooting compound
in the water.

I has been five days now and the leaves have not died.
All the ones I tried sticking in the ground, the leaves
died with in a day.

So a good sign, I guess. But no sign of any roots
yet. How long did yours take to develop roots?


Many thanks,
-T

songbird[_2_] 15-08-2019 05:40 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
T wrote:
....
All the ones I tried sticking in the ground, the leaves
died with in a day.

So a good sign, I guess. But no sign of any roots
yet. How long did yours take to develop roots?


were they mostly shaded and covered to prevent
excessive evaporative loss?

did you take all but one or two leaves off?

how did you cut the clippings from what
plant?

what kind of soil did you put them in?

did you keep them damp/moist but not sodden?

anyways good luck with the other approach. ;)


songbird

T[_4_] 15-08-2019 03:36 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 8/14/19 9:40 PM, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
All the ones I tried sticking in the ground, the leaves
died with in a day.

So a good sign, I guess. But no sign of any roots
yet. How long did yours take to develop roots?


were they mostly shaded and covered to prevent
excessive evaporative loss?

did you take all but one or two leaves off?


1st attempt, about two leaves. 2nd attempt, about 10 leaves.
3rd attempt, about three leaves

how did you cut the clippings from what
plant?


Pruning shears. Same ones I use to cut off my eggplant
fruit.

I cut flat. Should I have cut at an angle?


what kind of soil did you put them in?


Back fill, chicken poop fertilizer, peat moss.
Same as the other three holes where these plants
are going great guns


did you keep them damp/moist but not sodden?


Watered every other day. They got soaked pretty good.
First time lightly so as not to wash off the rooting
compound


anyways good luck with the other approach. ;)


songbird



I think maybe they need to be water every day.

Frustrating. The first attempt is still sticking
there. If yo shine a bright white light on it,
you can see the green in the trunk. Now you would
think that is a good sign, but it has been that way
since last fall!



songbird[_2_] 16-08-2019 04:08 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
T wrote:
songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
All the ones I tried sticking in the ground, the leaves
died with in a day.

So a good sign, I guess. But no sign of any roots
yet. How long did yours take to develop roots?


were they mostly shaded and covered to prevent
excessive evaporative loss?


???

sounds like no to both if you have to water that
often.

these are very important parts of this process.
you don't want them in direct light and you
do want them covered to keep moisture in
especially in an arid climate.




did you take all but one or two leaves off?


1st attempt, about two leaves. 2nd attempt, about 10 leaves.
3rd attempt, about three leaves

how did you cut the clippings from what
plant?


Pruning shears. Same ones I use to cut off my eggplant
fruit.

I cut flat. Should I have cut at an angle?


what kind of soil did you put them in?


Back fill, chicken poop fertilizer, peat moss.
Same as the other three holes where these plants
are going great guns


did you keep them damp/moist but not sodden?


Watered every other day. They got soaked pretty good.
First time lightly so as not to wash off the rooting
compound


anyways good luck with the other approach. ;)

....

I think maybe they need to be water every day.

Frustrating. The first attempt is still sticking
there. If yo shine a bright white light on it,
you can see the green in the trunk. Now you would
think that is a good sign, but it has been that way
since last fall!


no idea, if it is dead but perhaps that plant can
still have some green in it when dead. if it is
flexible that is another check. or a slight tug on
the twig doesn't move it (so there are roots there).
or you can actually moisten it well and then pop it
out of the pot and check for root growth.

what you describe above is likely too rich a
potting mix for rooting cuttings. and yes, cut
at an angle, but that isn't nearly as important
as keeping the cuttings covered and in mostly
shade.

a reasonable mix of starting soil for cuttings
if you can't just buy some cheap potting soil
and seed starting mix (i blend them to do cuttings
if i'm doing a lot of cuttings) would be to mix
peat moss and some of your subsoil with a little
clay mixed in there too. you want something that
helps hold some water. plain peat moss is ok, but
i think some mineral content is useful and of course
the clay.

nutrients you really only need to have when the
plant is actively growing. if you make the starting
mix too rich the cuttings may not do well at all and
they may rot or have odd fungal issues or other
disease problems.


songbird

[email protected] 16-08-2019 12:26 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On Thursday, June 27, 2019 at 7:51:06 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
Hi All,

I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant. This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.

I have been using this rooting compound:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

And it does not seem to work. Three failure so far.

Am I using the wrong stuff?

Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole. Did I miss something?

Many thanks,
-T


There are lots of woody plants grown in my area (WNC). Try this old nurserymans' trick. Cut the stem at a sharp angle, stick into a small potato and then proceed as already noted above. The potato maintains constant moisture.
Steve

T[_4_] 16-08-2019 07:01 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 8/15/19 8:08 PM, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
All the ones I tried sticking in the ground, the leaves
died with in a day.

So a good sign, I guess. But no sign of any roots
yet. How long did yours take to develop roots?

were they mostly shaded and covered to prevent
excessive evaporative loss?


???

sounds like no to both if you have to water that
often.

these are very important parts of this process.
you don't want them in direct light and you
do want them covered to keep moisture in
especially in an arid climate.




did you take all but one or two leaves off?


1st attempt, about two leaves. 2nd attempt, about 10 leaves.
3rd attempt, about three leaves

how did you cut the clippings from what
plant?


Pruning shears. Same ones I use to cut off my eggplant
fruit.

I cut flat. Should I have cut at an angle?


what kind of soil did you put them in?


Back fill, chicken poop fertilizer, peat moss.
Same as the other three holes where these plants
are going great guns


did you keep them damp/moist but not sodden?


Watered every other day. They got soaked pretty good.
First time lightly so as not to wash off the rooting
compound


anyways good luck with the other approach. ;)

...

I think maybe they need to be water every day.

Frustrating. The first attempt is still sticking
there. If yo shine a bright white light on it,
you can see the green in the trunk. Now you would
think that is a good sign, but it has been that way
since last fall!


no idea, if it is dead but perhaps that plant can
still have some green in it when dead. if it is
flexible that is another check. or a slight tug on
the twig doesn't move it (so there are roots there).
or you can actually moisten it well and then pop it
out of the pot and check for root growth.

what you describe above is likely too rich a
potting mix for rooting cuttings. and yes, cut
at an angle, but that isn't nearly as important
as keeping the cuttings covered and in mostly
shade.

a reasonable mix of starting soil for cuttings
if you can't just buy some cheap potting soil
and seed starting mix (i blend them to do cuttings
if i'm doing a lot of cuttings) would be to mix
peat moss and some of your subsoil with a little
clay mixed in there too. you want something that
helps hold some water. plain peat moss is ok, but
i think some mineral content is useful and of course
the clay.

nutrients you really only need to have when the
plant is actively growing. if you make the starting
mix too rich the cuttings may not do well at all and
they may rot or have odd fungal issues or other
disease problems.


songbird


Thank you!


T[_4_] 16-08-2019 07:02 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 8/16/19 4:26 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, June 27, 2019 at 7:51:06 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
Hi All,

I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant. This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.

I have been using this rooting compound:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

And it does not seem to work. Three failure so far.

Am I using the wrong stuff?

Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole. Did I miss something?

Many thanks,
-T


There are lots of woody plants grown in my area (WNC). Try this old nurserymans' trick. Cut the stem at a sharp angle, stick into a small potato and then proceed as already noted above. The potato maintains constant moisture.
Steve


Very Sneaky!!! If this attempt (#3) fails, I will
try the potato trick.


T[_4_] 18-08-2019 11:44 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 8/15/19 8:08 PM, songbird wrote:
and yes, cut at an angle


Since no roots still, I pulled it out and cut is
at a nice angle.

It seems to be loving the pampering! These
guys have made slaves out of us. (Wait till
he finds out what I am about to do with
his children!)

songbird[_2_] 19-08-2019 02:57 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
T wrote:
On 8/15/19 8:08 PM, songbird wrote:
and yes, cut at an angle


Since no roots still, I pulled it out and cut is
at a nice angle.


depending upon what type of plant the roots may
form at the nodes where the leaves came out from
that you removed or there may be spots on the stem
that can generate new roots, or even both...


It seems to be loving the pampering! These
guys have made slaves out of us. (Wait till
he finds out what I am about to do with
his children!)


if it is still alive that's all that counts.
you won't likely see new roots right away, not
many plants can restart them immediately but
perhaps within a week or two there should be
some signs.

again, this is dependent upon what type of
plant. some are very easy and others are
harder. mums are easy.

if you want to actually learn this sort of
thing invest some time at the library and get
some books on plant propagation.


songbird

Hul Tytus 29-08-2019 09:06 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 

I kept the bottles full for a month or two. Most recent bunch were
Oregon cedar trees (hopefully). These were clipped winter before last.
They appear to be growing nearly a foot this summer.

Hul

T wrote:
On 7/14/19 1:23 PM, Hul Tytus wrote:
I've had good luck in the winter by sticking the clippings in coke
bottles kept full with water and placing them in a south facing window.
When roots are noticeable & the weather is warm, stick them in the ground.

Hul


Hi Hul,


Well now, this time I tried sticking a clipping into
an empty bottle, with a tiny amount of rooting compound
in the water.


I has been five days now and the leaves have not died.
All the ones I tried sticking in the ground, the leaves
died with in a day.


So a good sign, I guess. But no sign of any roots
yet. How long did yours take to develop roots?



Many thanks,
-T


T[_4_] 31-08-2019 02:58 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 8/29/19 1:06 PM, Hul Tytus wrote:
I kept the bottles full for a month or two. Most recent bunch were
Oregon cedar trees (hopefully). These were clipped winter before last.
They appear to be growing nearly a foot this summer.

Hul

T wrote:
On 7/14/19 1:23 PM, Hul Tytus wrote:
I've had good luck in the winter by sticking the clippings in coke
bottles kept full with water and placing them in a south facing window.
When roots are noticeable & the weather is warm, stick them in the ground.

Hul


Hi Hul,


Well now, this time I tried sticking a clipping into
an empty bottle, with a tiny amount of rooting compound
in the water.


I has been five days now and the leaves have not died.
All the ones I tried sticking in the ground, the leaves
died with in a day.


So a good sign, I guess. But no sign of any roots
yet. How long did yours take to develop roots?



Many thanks,
-T


On 8/29/19 1:06 PM, Hul Tytus wrote: I kept the bottles full for a
month or two. Most recent bunch were
Oregon cedar trees (hopefully). These were clipped winter before last.
They appear to be growing nearly a foot this summer.

Hul



My clipping is loving all the pampering and the leaves
are very healthy. But no roots yet. Think it has
been four weeks now. Hmmmmmmmmmmmm



songbird[_2_] 31-08-2019 02:20 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
T wrote:
....
My clipping is loving all the pampering and the leaves
are very healthy. But no roots yet. Think it has
been four weeks now. Hmmmmmmmmmmmm


if it is still alive that's a good sign. patience...


songbird

Hul Tytus 31-08-2019 08:05 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 

Maybe you should be thinking of planting them next spring rather
than next week? The roots on the cedars were thin - 1/32 to 1/16
inch thick. About an inch or two long finally. Gaging from my
experience, you will eventually realize that the white fuzzy
stuff around the clipping's base is roots.

Hul


T[_4_] 01-09-2019 04:52 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 8/31/19 6:20 AM, songbird wrote:
patience...


:'(

T[_4_] 01-09-2019 04:53 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 8/31/19 12:05 PM, Hul Tytus wrote:
Maybe you should be thinking of planting them next spring rather
than next week? The roots on the cedars were thin - 1/32 to 1/16
inch thick. About an inch or two long finally. Gaging from my
experience, you will eventually realize that the white fuzzy
stuff around the clipping's base is roots.

Hul


There is some white stuff here and there. I though it was mold

T[_4_] 12-11-2019 11:13 AM

transplant clippings not taking
 
On 6/27/19 4:51 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

I am trying to get another Choke Berry (not cherry) to grow
by transferring a clipping from another plant.┬* This is
supposedly how these plants are propagated.

I have been using this rooting compound:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


And it does not seem to work.┬* Three failure so far.

Am I using the wrong stuff?

Cut, dip, make hole and pour some down the hole too,
stick in hole.┬* Did I miss something?

Many thanks,
-T


Question: should I change the water every so often in my clipping bottles?

-T


songbird[_2_] 12-11-2019 01:56 PM

transplant clippings not taking
 
T wrote:
....
Question: should I change the water every so often in my clipping bottles?


i always just topped them off as needed and
then when the roots started forming on the
clippings i'd pot those up and then i'd clean
out the bottle before starting the next round.


songbird


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