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Old 28-09-2019, 02:10 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

Hi All,

All good things come to and end.

According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F,
then 26, 27, 26. So I harvested everything big and small.
well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.

Now to plot out next year's garden!

And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants.
Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini
plant.

Also, it is time to plant my garlic.

-T


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Old 28-09-2019, 01:42 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On Friday, September 27, 2019 at 9:10:25 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
Hi All,

All good things come to and end.

According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F,
then 26, 27, 26. So I harvested everything big and small.
well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.

Now to plot out next year's garden!

And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants.
Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini
plant.

Also, it is time to plant my garlic.

-T


Where are you that it's getting that cold already? Our overnight lows here northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, are projected to be in the mid-60's for the next week, then falling to around 50. We've been very dry here, no noticeable rain for a couple of weeks. They're saying morning showers next Friday but those are frequently scattered around the area; one neighborhood gets wet, the one across the street stays dry.

Paul
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Old 28-09-2019, 11:25 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On 9/28/19 5:42 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Friday, September 27, 2019 at 9:10:25 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
Hi All,

All good things come to and end.

According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F,
then 26, 27, 26. So I harvested everything big and small.
well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.

Now to plot out next year's garden!

And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants.
Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini
plant.

Also, it is time to plant my garlic.

-T


Where are you that it's getting that cold already? Our overnight lows here northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, are projected to be in the mid-60's for the next week, then falling to around 50. We've been very dry here, no noticeable rain for a couple of weeks. They're saying morning showers next Friday but those are frequently scattered around the area; one neighborhood gets wet, the one across the street stays dry.

Paul


https://forecast.weather.gov/MapClic...73447126141484
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Old 29-09-2019, 03:29 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On Saturday, September 28, 2019 at 6:25:13 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 9/28/19 5:42 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Friday, September 27, 2019 at 9:10:25 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
Hi All,

All good things come to and end.

According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F,
then 26, 27, 26. So I harvested everything big and small.
well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.

Now to plot out next year's garden!

And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants.
Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini
plant.

Also, it is time to plant my garlic.

-T


Where are you that it's getting that cold already? Our overnight lows here northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, are projected to be in the mid-60's for the next week, then falling to around 50. We've been very dry here, no noticeable rain for a couple of weeks. They're saying morning showers next Friday but those are frequently scattered around the area; one neighborhood gets wet, the one across the street stays dry.

Paul


https://forecast.weather.gov/MapClic...73447126141484


I wouldn't have thought it got so cold so soon up there.

Paul
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Old 29-09-2019, 05:04 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On 9/28/19 7:29 PM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Saturday, September 28, 2019 at 6:25:13 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 9/28/19 5:42 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Friday, September 27, 2019 at 9:10:25 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
Hi All,

All good things come to and end.

According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F,
then 26, 27, 26. So I harvested everything big and small.
well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.

Now to plot out next year's garden!

And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants.
Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini
plant.

Also, it is time to plant my garlic.

-T

Where are you that it's getting that cold already? Our overnight lows here northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, are projected to be in the mid-60's for the next week, then falling to around 50. We've been very dry here, no noticeable rain for a couple of weeks. They're saying morning showers next Friday but those are frequently scattered around the area; one neighborhood gets wet, the one across the street stays dry.

Paul


https://forecast.weather.gov/MapClic...73447126141484


I wouldn't have thought it got so cold so soon up there.

Paul


It is always a fight between summer and winter. We have
a really short growing season


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Old 29-09-2019, 02:53 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

Pavel314 wrote:
....
I wouldn't have thought it got so cold so soon up there.


some of my garden friends up in Idaho have already had
snow on the ground this past week.

here we have two days of low 80s in the forecast for
Mon-Tue and then returning to cooler, but no frost or
freezing in the forecast for at least the next week so
far.

as long as it holds like this for a few more weeks
that should be good enough.

the early stuff is already in (onions, early beans,
tomatoes, cucumbers, squash). the later beans will go
as long as they can or until i can get out to pick them.

way too much rain this week so i may be picking some
pods in the rain (today included).


songbird
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Old 30-09-2019, 01:57 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On 9/28/19 9:04 PM, T wrote:
On 9/28/19 7:29 PM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Saturday, September 28, 2019 at 6:25:13 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 9/28/19 5:42 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Friday, September 27, 2019 at 9:10:25 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
Hi All,

All good things come to and end.

According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F,
then 26, 27, 26.** So I harvested everything big and small.
well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.

Now to plot out next year's garden!

And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants.
Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini
plant.

Also, it is time to plant my garlic.

-T

Where are you that it's getting that cold already? Our overnight
lows here northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, are projected to be in
the mid-60's for the next week, then falling to around 50. We've
been very dry here, no noticeable rain for a couple of weeks.
They're saying morning showers next Friday but those are frequently
scattered around the area; one neighborhood gets wet, the one across
the street stays dry.

Paul


https://forecast.weather.gov/MapClic...73447126141484


I wouldn't have thought it got so cold so soon up there.

Paul


It is always a fight between summer and winter.* We have
a really short growing season


The weather service said it got down to 28F last night. But
nothing froze. We did have winds about 20 mph. I wonder if
that had anything to do with it. Tonight is suppose to get worse.

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Old 30-09-2019, 01:02 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

T wrote:
....
The weather service said it got down to 28F last night. But
nothing froze. We did have winds about 20 mph. I wonder if
that had anything to do with it. Tonight is suppose to get worse.


be glad you're not in Montana... eek! that's way
too early to get that much snow!


songbird
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Old 30-09-2019, 01:21 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On 9/30/19 5:02 AM, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
The weather service said it got down to 28F last night. But
nothing froze. We did have winds about 20 mph. I wonder if
that had anything to do with it. Tonight is suppose to get worse.


be glad you're not in Montana... eek! that's way
too early to get that much snow!


songbird


¡Ay, caramba!

I listened to a documentary oh plans that won't domesticate. one of
them was "huckleberry". They REQUIRE high altitude
and a blanket of snow over them in the winter. (Cold
weather with out the snow cover kills them.) Montana
sounds like they will be getting a bumper crop of (wild)
huckleberries this years!

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Old 03-10-2019, 02:31 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On 9/27/19 6:10 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

All good things come to and end.

According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F,
then 26, 27, 26.** So I harvested everything big and small.
well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.

Now to plot out next year's garden!

And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants.
Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini
plant.

Also, it is time to plant my garlic.

-T



Well how about that. The weather service said we had
SEVERAL days at sub freezing and the kids did not die.
Huh!



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Old 03-10-2019, 01:01 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 2,832
Default All good things must come to an end

T wrote:
....
Well how about that. The weather service said we had
SEVERAL days at sub freezing and the kids did not die.
Huh!


everything here needs water wings. more rain still
in the forecast until next week when we may get enough
days in a row of dry weather to where i can get back
out and get a few things done. planting garlic would
be a good idea.

being inside for a few days in a row let me
get caught up on shelling, sorting and consolidating
box tops/flats so i have some space back in my room.

also got some of the worms fed - they look to be
doing alright.


songbird
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Old 03-10-2019, 04:51 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On 10/3/19 5:01 AM, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
Well how about that. The weather service said we had
SEVERAL days at sub freezing and the kids did not die.
Huh!


everything here needs water wings. more rain still
in the forecast until next week when we may get enough
days in a row of dry weather to where i can get back
out and get a few things done. planting garlic would
be a good idea.

being inside for a few days in a row let me
get caught up on shelling, sorting and consolidating
box tops/flats so i have some space back in my room.

also got some of the worms fed - they look to be
doing alright.


songbird


I keep wondering if I can buy worms and toss them in
all my holes. So far the only thing I can find are
fishing worms.
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Old 03-10-2019, 08:07 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

T wrote:
....
I keep wondering if I can buy worms and toss them in
all my holes. So far the only thing I can find are
fishing worms.


you can, but it would likely be a waste of $.

adult worms generally don't transplant well as
they are acclimated to the soil they were raised
in.

some fishing worms may do better than others.
do not, however, release worms into the wild or
wooded areas unless you know for a fact that
they are already there. night-crawlers from
North America, no, don't buy those as any type
of worm for raising or using in a garden as
they likely won't make it without special care
and they also may not be right for the area
anyways.

one worm you may find in a bait store will be
called either an european night crawler or a
belgian night crawler. these make excellent
compost worms but will likely not survive
extreme heat or cold so you might raise them
in buckets like i do and then put the worm
compost outside without too much worry that
they will be a problem to any native species.
yet, it is a good idea to ask your local
environmental type people what they'd think of
using them.

if you want any tips on raising worms in
buckets in the non-conventional way you can
check out my webpages for those:

http://www.anthive.com/project/worms/
http://www.anthive.com/project/taters/

the reason i call it non-conventional is
that many people do worm composting but they
don't use any dirt from the gardens in their
system so they are not recharging their garden
soil and also they usually aren't using a mix
of worms where i usually have at least three
to six worm species in the buckets here.

if you can find organic matter out and
around that is kept fairly wet/moist there
is a good chance it already has a population
of compost worms there. you can take a few
dozen from various place and that will often
work just fine to start with.

as you get deeper garden soil you can then
look for gardners around your area who would
likely be happy to share some other species
of worms with you to use.


songbird
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Old 04-10-2019, 09:32 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default All good things must come to an end

On 10/2/19 6:31 PM, T wrote:
On 9/27/19 6:10 PM, T wrote:
Hi All,

All good things come to and end.

According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F,
then 26, 27, 26.** So I harvested everything big and small.
well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.

Now to plot out next year's garden!

And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants.
Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini
plant.

Also, it is time to plant my garlic.

-T



Well how about that.* The weather service said we had
SEVERAL days at sub freezing and the kids did not die.
Huh!


Last night got them. Very pathetic looking. Time
to pull out all the dead plants.

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Old 05-10-2019, 12:43 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 910
Default All good things must come to an end

On 10/3/19 12:07 PM, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
I keep wondering if I can buy worms and toss them in
all my holes. So far the only thing I can find are
fishing worms.


you can, but it would likely be a waste of $.

adult worms generally don't transplant well as
they are acclimated to the soil they were raised
in.

some fishing worms may do better than others.
do not, however, release worms into the wild or
wooded areas unless you know for a fact that
they are already there. night-crawlers from
North America, no, don't buy those as any type
of worm for raising or using in a garden as
they likely won't make it without special care
and they also may not be right for the area
anyways.

one worm you may find in a bait store will be
called either an european night crawler or a
belgian night crawler. these make excellent
compost worms but will likely not survive
extreme heat or cold so you might raise them
in buckets like i do and then put the worm
compost outside without too much worry that
they will be a problem to any native species.
yet, it is a good idea to ask your local
environmental type people what they'd think of
using them.

if you want any tips on raising worms in
buckets in the non-conventional way you can
check out my webpages for those:

http://www.anthive.com/project/worms/
http://www.anthive.com/project/taters/

the reason i call it non-conventional is
that many people do worm composting but they
don't use any dirt from the gardens in their
system so they are not recharging their garden
soil and also they usually aren't using a mix
of worms where i usually have at least three
to six worm species in the buckets here.

if you can find organic matter out and
around that is kept fairly wet/moist there
is a good chance it already has a population
of compost worms there. you can take a few
dozen from various place and that will often
work just fine to start with.

as you get deeper garden soil you can then
look for gardners around your area who would
likely be happy to share some other species
of worms with you to use.


songbird


Thank you!

The last thing I wanted to do was introduce an invasive
species!

I see about two a year in the garden. I presume
the better my soil gets, the more of their cousins
will comes.




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