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Old 05-10-2019, 06:43 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Hi All,

I just watched a video:

Watch This BEFORE Buying Garden Soil for Vegetable Patch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rU-76AnBEao

He makes the point that you have to add organic material
even to the best imported soil. He makes his point at
9:00 on the video.

What is the best way to get this kind of stuff into
my ground pots? Can I buy a bag of this stuff on
Amazon? What is it called?

-T

The stuff he had was from down under.

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Old 05-10-2019, 01:31 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:

....
What is the best way to get this kind of stuff into
my ground pots? Can I buy a bag of this stuff on
Amazon? What is it called?

....
The stuff he had was from down under.


you can buy bagged compost at many garden
centers. it is often composted cow manure
or composted chicken manure added to perhaps
some other fillers.

most composted cow manure is very poor in
terms of nutrients, but yes, it is an organic
material and can be useful in a garden if you
have poor/heavy soil.

study composting and how to do it and i've
often mentioned ways of getting organic materials
for free or low cost here.

as a side note, i hate raised beds as he's
done there. huge expense and added labor.

you can also tell that he is in a pretty
wet climate, which is not the same as where
you are at. raised beds in arid climates
are asking for baked and too dry roots and
more moisture loss from the breezes.

if you want to see what arid alkaline soils
can do with compost check out the greening
the dessert (search on that phrase on youtube
and you'll find some videos about that). i've
been watching them from the start.


songbird
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Old 05-10-2019, 04:05 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 10/5/19 6:31 AM, songbird wrote:
you can buy bagged compost at many garden
centers. it is often composted cow manure
or composted chicken manure added to perhaps
some other fillers.

most composted cow manure is very poor in
terms of nutrients, but yes, it is an organic
material and can be useful in a garden if you
have poor/heavy soil.


Horse manure is really great stuff if you can get it. Maybe check with
a nearby stable or agricultural college; any place that keeps horses is
invariably generating "horsepucky" and may well be happy to give it away
for free. Alpaca or lama manure might also be good but I can't say for sure.

J
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:16 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 10/5/2019 11:05 AM, jeff wrote:
On 10/5/19 6:31 AM, songbird wrote:
you can buy bagged compost at many garden
centers. it is often composted cow manure
or composted chicken manure added to perhaps
some other fillers.

most composted cow manure is very poor in
terms of nutrients, but yes, it is an organic
material and can be useful in a garden if you
have poor/heavy soil.


Horse manure is really great stuff if you can get it. Maybe check with
a nearby stable or agricultural college; any place that keeps horses is
invariably generating "horsepucky" and may well be happy to give it away
for free. Alpaca or lama manure might also be good but I can't say for sure.

J

An organic farmer once cautioned on using stuff from a stable because it
may contain considerable pesticide used to keep flies down there.

Where I live there are a lot of mushroom houses and depleted mushroom
soil is available. The only concern is weed seeds.
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Old 06-10-2019, 12:12 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 10/5/19 9:16 AM, Frank wrote:
On 10/5/2019 11:05 AM, jeff wrote:
On 10/5/19 6:31 AM, songbird wrote:
** you can buy bagged compost at many garden
centers.* it is often composted cow manure
or composted chicken manure added to perhaps
some other fillers.

** most composted cow manure is very poor in
terms of nutrients, but yes, it is an organic
material and can be useful in a garden if you
have poor/heavy soil.


Horse manure is really great stuff if you can get it.* Maybe check with
a nearby stable or agricultural college; any place that keeps horses is
invariably generating "horsepucky" and may well be happy to give it away
for free. Alpaca or lama manure might also be good but I can't say for
sure.

J

An organic farmer once cautioned on using stuff from a stable because it
may contain considerable pesticide used to keep flies down there.

Where I live there are a lot of mushroom houses and depleted mushroom
soil is available.* The only concern is weed seeds.


Thank you all!



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Old 06-10-2019, 02:51 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 12:17:26 PM UTC-4, Frank wrote:
On 10/5/2019 11:05 AM, jeff wrote:
On 10/5/19 6:31 AM, songbird wrote:
you can buy bagged compost at many garden
centers. it is often composted cow manure
or composted chicken manure added to perhaps
some other fillers.

most composted cow manure is very poor in
terms of nutrients, but yes, it is an organic
material and can be useful in a garden if you
have poor/heavy soil.


Horse manure is really great stuff if you can get it. Maybe check with
a nearby stable or agricultural college; any place that keeps horses is
invariably generating "horsepucky" and may well be happy to give it away
for free. Alpaca or lama manure might also be good but I can't say for sure.

J

An organic farmer once cautioned on using stuff from a stable because it
may contain considerable pesticide used to keep flies down there.

Where I live there are a lot of mushroom houses and depleted mushroom
soil is available. The only concern is weed seeds.


We have a flock of sheep and don't use pesticides in the barn, so we have a good supply of sheep manure. In fact, we're going to shovel out the sheep barn in November to throw on the garden. Then again before the annual shearing in May.

There are a lot of mushroom houses across the state line in PA but we haven't tried any of them yet.

Paul
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Old 06-10-2019, 02:55 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 10/5/19 6:51 PM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 12:17:26 PM UTC-4, Frank wrote:
On 10/5/2019 11:05 AM, jeff wrote:
On 10/5/19 6:31 AM, songbird wrote:
you can buy bagged compost at many garden
centers. it is often composted cow manure
or composted chicken manure added to perhaps
some other fillers.

most composted cow manure is very poor in
terms of nutrients, but yes, it is an organic
material and can be useful in a garden if you
have poor/heavy soil.

Horse manure is really great stuff if you can get it. Maybe check with
a nearby stable or agricultural college; any place that keeps horses is
invariably generating "horsepucky" and may well be happy to give it away
for free. Alpaca or lama manure might also be good but I can't say for sure.

J

An organic farmer once cautioned on using stuff from a stable because it
may contain considerable pesticide used to keep flies down there.

Where I live there are a lot of mushroom houses and depleted mushroom
soil is available. The only concern is weed seeds.


We have a flock of sheep and don't use pesticides in the barn, so we have a good supply of sheep manure. In fact, we're going to shovel out the sheep barn in November to throw on the garden. Then again before the annual shearing in May.

There are a lot of mushroom houses across the state line in PA but we haven't tried any of them yet.

Paul


Do you dig in the sheep scat or just throw it on top?
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:13 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 10/5/2019 8:55 PM, T wrote:


Do you dig in the sheep scat or just throw it on top?


About compost ... what do you have access to that you can use for compost?

--
Maggie
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Old 06-10-2019, 06:30 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 10/5/19 8:13 PM, Muggles wrote:
On 10/5/2019 8:55 PM, T wrote:


Do you dig in the sheep scat or just throw it on top?


About compost ... what do you have access to that you can use for compost?


I can buy it from a local producer, but it is worseless
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Old 06-10-2019, 02:25 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 9:55:21 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 10/5/19 6:51 PM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 12:17:26 PM UTC-4, Frank wrote:
On 10/5/2019 11:05 AM, jeff wrote:
On 10/5/19 6:31 AM, songbird wrote:
you can buy bagged compost at many garden
centers. it is often composted cow manure
or composted chicken manure added to perhaps
some other fillers.

most composted cow manure is very poor in
terms of nutrients, but yes, it is an organic
material and can be useful in a garden if you
have poor/heavy soil.

Horse manure is really great stuff if you can get it. Maybe check with
a nearby stable or agricultural college; any place that keeps horses is
invariably generating "horsepucky" and may well be happy to give it away
for free. Alpaca or lama manure might also be good but I can't say for sure.

J

An organic farmer once cautioned on using stuff from a stable because it
may contain considerable pesticide used to keep flies down there.

Where I live there are a lot of mushroom houses and depleted mushroom
soil is available. The only concern is weed seeds.


We have a flock of sheep and don't use pesticides in the barn, so we have a good supply of sheep manure. In fact, we're going to shovel out the sheep barn in November to throw on the garden. Then again before the annual shearing in May.

There are a lot of mushroom houses across the state line in PA but we haven't tried any of them yet.

Paul


Do you dig in the sheep scat or just throw it on top?


I usually till it into the soil. My wife sometimes uses it as a mulch during the growing season to smother the weeds.

Paul


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Old 06-10-2019, 02:30 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 11:13:43 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:
On 10/5/2019 8:55 PM, T wrote:


Do you dig in the sheep scat or just throw it on top?


About compost ... what do you have access to that you can use for compost?

--
Maggie


I built a three-bin compost system some years ago. Each bin is 4 feet wide, 6 feet deep, and 8 feet high. We fill one with weeds each summer and rotate using them each year as they compost. Here's a pictu

https://hosting.photobucket.com/albu...psp7iob3xu.jpg

Paul
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Old 06-10-2019, 02:41 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 10/6/2019 12:30 AM, T wrote:
On 10/5/19 8:13 PM, Muggles wrote:
On 10/5/2019 8:55 PM, T wrote:


Do you dig in the sheep scat or just throw it on top?


About compost ... what do you have access to that you can use for
compost?


I can buy it from a local producer, but it is worseless


Do you have shredded paper, veggie/kitchen waste, coffee grounds? Can
you buy some red wiggler worms?

--
Maggie
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Old 06-10-2019, 03:34 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 22:43:36 -0700, T wrote:

Hi All,

I just watched a video:

Watch This BEFORE Buying Garden Soil for Vegetable Patch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rU-76AnBEao

He makes the point that you have to add organic material
even to the best imported soil. He makes his point at
9:00 on the video.

What is the best way to get this kind of stuff into
my ground pots? Can I buy a bag of this stuff on
Amazon? What is it called?

-T

The stuff he had was from down under.


When buying compost or manure, make sure you know where it originates.
https://www.sonomacountygazette.com/...p-aminopyralid

Ross.
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:29 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Pavel314 wrote:
....
I usually till it into the soil. My wife sometimes uses it as a mulch during the growing season to smother the weeds.


if you can find some plain cardboard (usually places will
give it away for free) or newspapers you can put that down
first and then top with your mulch and that will do a great
job of smothering weeds for a while.

i much prefer it to using herbicides.

the problem with late fall application of manures is that
if there is any run off during the winter it can move those
extra nutrients into the surrounding water ways.

best to apply nutrients when plants are actively growing.
don't waste 'em! surface tilling in is better than leaving
them exposed (all the volatile components will dry off as
compared to the soil microbes being able to get at them).


songbird
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Old 07-10-2019, 01:50 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 10/6/19 6:30 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 11:13:43 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:
On 10/5/2019 8:55 PM, T wrote:


Do you dig in the sheep scat or just throw it on top?


About compost ... what do you have access to that you can use for compost?

--
Maggie


I built a three-bin compost system some years ago. Each bin is 4 feet wide, 6 feet deep, and 8 feet high. We fill one with weeds each summer and rotate using them each year as they compost. Here's a pictu

https://hosting.photobucket.com/albu...psp7iob3xu.jpg

Paul


Hi Paul,

The bin looked open.

And does it get hot enough to kill weed seeds?

-T


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