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Old 20-05-2020, 11:24 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 2020-05-18 18:30, songbird wrote:
hunting them in the fall would be good if i
could bring myself to do it, but i'm not that
hungry yet.


Venison. Yuk Yuk Yuk Yuk.

Moose, elk. YUM!

Rabbit? Never tried it.



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Old 20-05-2020, 11:26 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 2020-05-18 19:09, Snag wrote:
70 pound Mountain Cur


I give up. What is a 70 pound mountain cur?
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Old 20-05-2020, 11:29 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 5/20/2020 3:23 PM, T wrote:
On 2020-05-18 18:30, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
On 2020-05-17 04:31, RosemontCrest wrote:
3) Deer. It is common for deer to chomp the tops off flowers, taste
them,¬*then¬*discard¬*them¬*if¬*not¬*tasty¬*enough .¬*Deer¬*have¬*no¬*fear¬*of¬*cats.

One of my customers uses a radio controlled toy car to
chase deer.¬* Deer don't fear yip dogs either.


¬*¬* with a night scope and a flash bang of some kind
that could be fun.¬* mini-tank with big bore spark
shooting noise maker.¬*

¬*¬* in the end though a fence would be cheaper and
nice to keep the ticks away.¬* we've already found
two deer ticks this year (not by them biting us)
in the house brought in on clothes after working
in areas where they come through the yard.¬* i
wrap the lil buggers in a bit of toilet paper
and then chop them with scissors to make sure
they are dead.¬* they're very hard to kill.

¬*¬* hunting them in the fall would be good if i
could bring myself to do it, but i'm not that
hungry yet.


¬*¬* songbird


Deer will jump of a 12 foot fence.


Possibly. Deer can jump great heights.

The trick is
to make sure they can see what in on the other
side and they won't attempt it


The trick is to make sure that they can NOT see what is on the other side.
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Old 20-05-2020, 11:56 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 2020-05-20 15:29, RosemontCrest wrote:
Deer will jump of a 12 foot fence.


Possibly.¬*Deer¬*can¬*jump¬*great¬*heights.


I saw one jump a 12 foot chain link. From
free standing. Freaked me out.


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Old 21-05-2020, 12:59 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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RosemontCrest wrote:
....
The trick is to make sure that they can NOT see what is on the other side.


i have no desire to put up a solid fence.

6ft is sufficient here but 8ft is better.

also having various obstructions and uneven
footing around makes it harder for them to
try it.


songbird


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Old 21-05-2020, 01:00 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:
....
I give up. What is a 70 pound mountain cur?


some kind of dawg.


songbird
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Old 21-05-2020, 01:25 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 5/20/2020 5:26 PM, T wrote:
On 2020-05-18 19:09, Snag wrote:
70 pound Mountain Cur


I give up.¬* What is a 70 pound mountain cur?


It's a dog , a very ferocious dog with big teeth . Actually , Max
(Doggus Maximus the Handsome Hairball) thinks there is no such thing as
a stranger , just a lot of friends he hasn't met yet . This is an old
breed , originated in the Appalachians way back in colonial days . They
were bred for herding , hunting , and protecting the family and stock .
They're smart and headstrong and it's a constant thing to remind him
he's not the boss . And as long as he's by my side there's nothing out
in these woods that I fear .
--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crotchety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !
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Old 21-05-2020, 02:47 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 2020-05-20 17:25, Snag wrote:
On 5/20/2020 5:26 PM, T wrote:
On 2020-05-18 19:09, Snag wrote:
70 pound Mountain Cur


I give up.¬* What is a 70 pound mountain cur?


¬* It's a dog , a very ferocious dog with big teeth.


Adolf?

Actually , Max
(Doggus Maximus the Handsome Hairball) thinks there is no such thing as
a stranger , just a lot of friends he hasn't met yet .


Okay, not Adolf

This is an old
breed , originated in the Appalachians way back in colonial days . They
were bred for herding , hunting , and protecting the family and stock .
They're smart and headstrong and it's a constant thing to remind him
he's not the boss . And as long as he's by my side there's nothing out
in these woods that I fear .


Dogs are such loving spirits.

:-)


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Old 21-05-2020, 03:00 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:

Deer don't fear yip dogs either.

Where I live,those little shit-eaters are unaffectionately known as
"shark bait", although, tradionalists and some purists insist on
reserving that term for kittens. No deer to speak of in these parts but
the neighbor's pet hog occasionally gets into my stash of alfalfa
pellets and makes a huge mess. Rabbits are more likely to be the
culprits snackng on garden truck around here. I am owned by
sixĖsometimes sevenĖcats who do a creditable job of keeping the local
tree rats at bay while leaving the bunnies largely unmolested. The last
time I saw unsupervised deer, they were quietly gazing in the
right-of-way alongside U.S.19 a few miles north of Clearwatwer, FL, very
early one morning about twenty years ago. I stopped fooling with
margolds when I saw through the myth that marigolds control certain
soil-dwelling nematodes. Nowadays, I introduce store-bought nematodes
that eat them.
One fellow, a couple of miles distant, and who clearly has been in
these woods far longer than I has his entire garden (well. five sides of
it) encaged in what appears, from drive-by distance, to be chain link
fencing. No wildlife is going to disturb that garden!
--
Derald
....the only traits that are passed down in your family
are perversity, ego-centrism, laziness and sociopathic tendencies.
--Lynn Barton, Filedheacht Music School, East Bridgewater, MA to Derald, July, 2016


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Old 21-05-2020, 04:29 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 2020-05-20 17:00, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
I give up. What is a 70 pound mountain cur?


some kind of dawg.


songbird


It's a "southern" dog? Growl at all northerners,
but does not remember why?

:-)

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Old 21-05-2020, 03:12 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Wednesday, May 20, 2020 at 6:23:39 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 2020-05-18 18:30, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
On 2020-05-17 04:31, RosemontCrest wrote:
3) Deer. It is common for deer to chomp the tops off flowers, taste
them,¬*then¬*discard¬*them¬*if¬*not¬*tasty¬*enough .¬*Deer¬*have¬*no¬*fear¬*of¬*cats.

One of my customers uses a radio controlled toy car to
chase deer. Deer don't fear yip dogs either.


with a night scope and a flash bang of some kind
that could be fun. mini-tank with big bore spark
shooting noise maker.

in the end though a fence would be cheaper and
nice to keep the ticks away. we've already found
two deer ticks this year (not by them biting us)
in the house brought in on clothes after working
in areas where they come through the yard. i
wrap the lil buggers in a bit of toilet paper
and then chop them with scissors to make sure
they are dead. they're very hard to kill.

hunting them in the fall would be good if i
could bring myself to do it, but i'm not that
hungry yet.


songbird


Deer will jump of a 12 foot fence. The trick is
to make sure they can see what in on the other
side and they won't attempt it


We were having problems with critters invading the garden so we bought a motion activated device that hooks up to the hose and noisily squirts a stream of water when activated. It can be adjusted for range of squirting, from straight ahead to over 180 degrees and set for night, day, or both. Very sensitive; we both got squirted when coming too close to the garden after dark.

Paul
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Old 22-05-2020, 03:02 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 2020-05-21 07:12, Pavel314 wrote:
On Wednesday, May 20, 2020 at 6:23:39 PM UTC-4, T wrote:
On 2020-05-18 18:30, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
On 2020-05-17 04:31, RosemontCrest wrote:
3) Deer. It is common for deer to chomp the tops off flowers, taste
them,¬*then¬*discard¬*them¬*if¬*not¬*tasty¬*enough .¬*Deer¬*have¬*no¬*fear¬*of¬*cats.

One of my customers uses a radio controlled toy car to
chase deer. Deer don't fear yip dogs either.

with a night scope and a flash bang of some kind
that could be fun. mini-tank with big bore spark
shooting noise maker.

in the end though a fence would be cheaper and
nice to keep the ticks away. we've already found
two deer ticks this year (not by them biting us)
in the house brought in on clothes after working
in areas where they come through the yard. i
wrap the lil buggers in a bit of toilet paper
and then chop them with scissors to make sure
they are dead. they're very hard to kill.

hunting them in the fall would be good if i
could bring myself to do it, but i'm not that
hungry yet.


songbird


Deer will jump of a 12 foot fence. The trick is
to make sure they can see what in on the other
side and they won't attempt it


We were having problems with critters invading the garden so we bought a motion activated device that hooks up to the hose and noisily squirts a stream of water when activated. It can be adjusted for range of squirting, from straight ahead to over 180 degrees and set for night, day, or both. Very sensitive; we both got squirted when coming too close to the garden after dark.

Paul



I love it!


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Old 24-05-2020, 09:31 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:

He better bury the fencing three down or critter
will burrow under it?

We have pocket gophers and moles but bhoth are uncommon; besides,
cats do a superb job of mole control. Also we have a terrestrial
tortoise commimly called. "gopher tortise" or simply "gopher" that
burrows amd can damage roadways and building foundatioins but I've no
knowedge of goirtoise damage to gardens or farmlands. Ictims of
"progress" and of "improvement" such tortoises now a protected and must
be relocated if their presence conflkicts with human activities. We
have several of those here witth us ad, years ago, we marked three with
spra paint. Those appear to roam over a narrow range and to live a long
time. Over past twenty yearws, we've re-painted all of them at least
one time because the sandy soil abrades the pait away.
Insects, rabbitsand raccoons are more likely the sources of garden
damage he The bugs and the bunnies eat stuff and the raccoons dig
holes around the peripheryĖjust insideĖseemingly just for the hell of
it. Bt and "nolo" control the most vociferous of the bugs; house/yard
cats keer the rabbits at bay; and we bait the raccoons away from the
garden to an established feeding station. Killing or relocating the
cute little *******s only increases their number. Raccoons are easily
habituated (which is not to say "tamed") so I keep them fat and happy
with the lowest-priced dry dog food from Aldi's.
I hope you can live with the typos. I've enjoyed two strokes since
August 2018 and belive when I say that recovery, w3hat there is of it is
a stone bitch. Haven't been near the garden since August,'18 and, as I
told 'bird in email, my haneds behavew as if thedy have mindsóbut not
brainsóof their own. Happy Memorial Day weekend to y'all aaaaaand happy
wedding anniversary to ME! (May 26)
--
Derald
Peninsular FL, USA
USDA 9b



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