#1   Report Post  
Old 27-09-2020, 03:10 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,004
Default a few squash pics


the varigated ones, a cross between kabocha and a local
pumpkin of some kind:

http://www.anthive.com/img/edibles/t...Squash_thm.jpg


supposed to be small squash? i'd hate to meet the parents!

http://www.anthive.com/img/edibles/t...ubbard_thm.jpg


http://www.anthive.com/project/edibles/


songbird

  #2   Report Post  
Old 28-09-2020, 10:23 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2015
Posts: 1,068
Default a few squash pics

On 2020-09-27 06:10, songbird wrote:
the varigated ones, a cross between kabocha and a local
pumpkin of some kind:

http://www.anthive.com/img/edibles/t...Squash_thm.jpg


supposed to be small squash? i'd hate to meet the parents!

http://www.anthive.com/img/edibles/t...ubbard_thm.jpg


http://www.anthive.com/project/edibles/


songbird


Gorgeous!
  #3   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2020, 12:59 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2015
Posts: 249
Default a few squash pics

On 9/28/2020 4:23 AM, T wrote:
On 2020-09-27 06:10, songbird wrote:
** the varigated ones, a cross between kabocha and a local
pumpkin of some kind:

http://www.anthive.com/img/edibles/t...Squash_thm.jpg



** supposed to be small squash?* i'd hate to meet the parents!

http://www.anthive.com/img/edibles/t...ubbard_thm.jpg



** http://www.anthive.com/project/edibles/


songbird


Gorgeous!


I liked them too.
  #4   Report Post  
Old 03-10-2020, 02:34 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,004
Default a few squash pics

Frank wrote:
On 9/28/2020 4:23 AM, T wrote:
Gorgeous!


I liked them too.


thanks!

i managed to get a bucket of the small squash gone
through yesterday, cleaned and baked.

some of them weren't even done yet and i discarded
them after previous years experiments in baking or
cooking with them i decided i just didn't like them
enough and the worms will appreciate them more when
i bury them in the gardens later today instead.

the buttercup variety we tried this year i will
give one more try next year. the taste and texture
are a lot more like an acorn squash than the buttercup
i was hoping for.

the kabocha and pumpkin variegated cross seems to
be doing well enough so we'll keep growing that.

i haven't cooked up any of the hubbards yet, i hope
they store and age well as i'm not sure when i'll get
back to them to cook one up.


songbird
  #5   Report Post  
Old 05-10-2020, 03:55 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 319
Default a few squash pics

On Saturday, October 3, 2020 at 9:00:23 AM UTC-4, songbird wrote:
Frank wrote:
On 9/28/2020 4:23 AM, T wrote:
Gorgeous!


I liked them too.

thanks!

i managed to get a bucket of the small squash gone
through yesterday, cleaned and baked.

some of them weren't even done yet and i discarded
them after previous years experiments in baking or
cooking with them i decided i just didn't like them
enough and the worms will appreciate them more when
i bury them in the gardens later today instead.

the buttercup variety we tried this year i will
give one more try next year. the taste and texture
are a lot more like an acorn squash than the buttercup
i was hoping for.

the kabocha and pumpkin variegated cross seems to
be doing well enough so we'll keep growing that.

i haven't cooked up any of the hubbards yet, i hope
they store and age well as i'm not sure when i'll get
back to them to cook one up.


songbird


I planted buttercups this year and didn't think they yielded anything. Recently, I went out to the pumpkin patch and noticed 7 or 8 of them hiding under the leaves of the pumpkin vines. The cantaloupes did well, but we didn't get anything from the petit gris melons. The vines were very petit and got buried under the vines and leaves of the usual pumpkins.

We planted blue hubbards for a few years now; they tend to keep well for several months if kept cool. We put the pumpkin harvest in out unheated garage and if any are noticed spoiling, they go over the fence to the sheep, who really enjoy a pumpkin treat after a couple of months of hay.

Looks like a good harvest of the Dikenson pumpkins this year; those are the commercial variety that get processed into the pumpkin pie filling you find at the grocery store.

Paul


  #6   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2020, 05:48 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,004
Default a few squash pics

Pavel314 wrote:
....
I planted buttercups this year and didn't think they yielded anything. Recently, I went out to the pumpkin patch and noticed 7 or 8 of them hiding under the leaves of the pumpkin vines. The cantaloupes did well, but we didn't get anything from the petit gris melons. The vines were very petit and got buried under the vines and leaves of the usual pumpkins.


Petit Gris Melons were new for us this year and i put them at
the sides and ends of two gardens so the vines could sprawl on
the rocks and pathways. they did great. for six vines we had
about 40 melons total and we ate about 25 of them (at least).
next year we're not planning on planting so many since we can't
keep up with that many at a time. we ended up giving away
about a dozen. towards the end of the season the flavor does
decrease which is a sad thing, but they are still edible. i'm
planning on growing them again next year.

i have a billion seeds saved from these.


We planted blue hubbards for a few years now; they tend to keep well for several months if kept cool. We put the pumpkin harvest in out unheated garage and if any are noticed spoiling, they go over the fence to the sheep, who really enjoy a pumpkin treat after a couple of months of hay.


do you have to cut them up first?

how do you describe the flavor/texture of a hubbard?


Looks like a good harvest of the Dikenson pumpkins this year; those are the commercial variety that get processed into the pumpkin pie filling you find at the grocery store.


squash and pumpkin are pretty much the same thing. when you
read up on what the big processors use for their pie filling it
is a squash variety. i'm always happy with pumpkin pies and
wouldn't mind having the filling home made but in recent years
we've taken to eating things without crusts instead so we do
more like apple crisps and puddings with fruits and such.


songbird
  #7   Report Post  
Old 08-10-2020, 03:01 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 319
Default a few squash pics

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020 at 11:49:00 AM UTC-4, songbird wrote:
Pavel314 wrote:
...
I planted buttercups this year and didn't think they yielded anything. Recently, I went out to the pumpkin patch and noticed 7 or 8 of them hiding under the leaves of the pumpkin vines. The cantaloupes did well, but we didn't get anything from the petit gris melons. The vines were very petit and got buried under the vines and leaves of the usual pumpkins.

Petit Gris Melons were new for us this year and i put them at
the sides and ends of two gardens so the vines could sprawl on
the rocks and pathways. they did great. for six vines we had
about 40 melons total and we ate about 25 of them (at least).
next year we're not planning on planting so many since we can't
keep up with that many at a time. we ended up giving away
about a dozen. towards the end of the season the flavor does
decrease which is a sad thing, but they are still edible. i'm
planning on growing them again next year.

i have a billion seeds saved from these.
We planted blue hubbards for a few years now; they tend to keep well for several months if kept cool. We put the pumpkin harvest in out unheated garage and if any are noticed spoiling, they go over the fence to the sheep, who really enjoy a pumpkin treat after a couple of months of hay.

do you have to cut them up first?


Generally they smash to pieces when I toss them over the fence but frequently I cut them into several segments.


how do you describe the flavor/texture of a hubbard?


Unfortunately, neither my wife nor I could recall anything unusual about them. They were a good squash for eating or baking into a pie.


Looks like a good harvest of the Dikenson pumpkins this year; those are the commercial variety that get processed into the pumpkin pie filling you find at the grocery store.

squash and pumpkin are pretty much the same thing. when you
read up on what the big processors use for their pie filling it
is a squash variety. i'm always happy with pumpkin pies and
wouldn't mind having the filling home made but in recent years
we've taken to eating things without crusts instead so we do
more like apple crisps and puddings with fruits and such.


Have you ever tried making custard inside of a pumpkin? I read that it was a favorite of George Washington. We tried it once. I thought it was pretty good but my wife didn't care for it. https://www.aveggieventure.com/2009/...h-custard.html

songbird

  #8   Report Post  
Old 09-10-2020, 07:44 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,004
Default a few squash pics

Pavel314 wrote:
songbird wrote:

....
how do you describe the flavor/texture of a hubbard?


Unfortunately, neither my wife nor I could recall anything unusual about them. They were a good squash for eating or baking into a pie.


ok, well at least they were not obviously horrible.

i think the next batch of squash i bake up i'll do one
of the smaller hubbards just to see what it is like.
we just finished off the last of the first batch i baked
up of the smallest squash.


....
Have you ever tried making custard inside of a pumpkin? I read that it was a favorite of George Washington. We tried it once. I thought it was pretty good but my wife didn't care for it. https://www.aveggieventure.com/2009/...h-custard.html


i would probably like it, i like custards in general. we
don't have pumpkins here that we've grown so no real reason
for me to try it. also we don't have extra milk/eggs to use
up and i'm trying to avoid extra calories so unlikely to
give this a try any time soon. something on my list first
will be a rice pudding the way Mom used to make it when i
was a kid. in the past umpteen years she's been making it
another way and it just isn't the same. i'm really not
that big on rice so if i'm going to eat it this is the way
i'd like to have some.


songbird


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
growing squash with few bees Jeff Thies Edible Gardening 7 18-05-2010 05:36 PM
A few pics of finished pond Denise Ponds 5 22-07-2004 08:36 PM
A few new PICS of my koi Denise Ponds 4 08-02-2004 06:48 AM
A few new PICS of my koi/oops Denise Ponds 0 06-02-2004 10:42 PM
A few pics to share :-) Denise Ponds 2 29-06-2003 12:20 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:32 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017