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Old 11-10-2020, 11:01 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

Hi All,

Are green beans very difficult to grow? (Keep in
mind my black thumb.)

Found these with a 50 day maturity:

https://www.burpee.com/vegetables/be...rod000579.html

No strings either.

And my trophy wife loves the way I cook green beans:
bacon fat, garlic, onions, oregano, cut green beans

Many thanks,
-T

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Old 13-10-2020, 02:30 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

T wrote:
Hi All,

Are green beans very difficult to grow? (Keep in
mind my black thumb.)


er, well, some can be and others aren't as much but
it is going to depend upon your climate and soil.

here i have certain varieties that have done well
over the years and others that struggle (planted right
next to each other in the same soil so they are
treated the same in terms of climate and watering).

the hard part there is going to be how to get 50-60
days before it gets really hot out as i think then the
plants may have a hard time setting pods and keeping
them - but perhaps this variety will hold up longer.
dunno until you try.


Found these with a 50 day maturity:

https://www.burpee.com/vegetables/be...rod000579.html

No strings either.


wish they had pictures of the seeds.


songbird
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Old 13-10-2020, 03:20 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

On 2020-10-12 17:30, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
Hi All,

Are green beans very difficult to grow? (Keep in
mind my black thumb.)


er, well, some can be and others aren't as much but
it is going to depend upon your climate and soil.

here i have certain varieties that have done well
over the years and others that struggle (planted right
next to each other in the same soil so they are
treated the same in terms of climate and watering).

the hard part there is going to be how to get 50-60
days before it gets really hot out as i think then the
plants may have a hard time setting pods and keeping
them - but perhaps this variety will hold up longer.
dunno until you try.


Found these with a 50 day maturity:

https://www.burpee.com/vegetables/be...rod000579.html

No strings either.


wish they had pictures of the seeds.


songbird


Thank you. One has to try!


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Old 13-10-2020, 03:21 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

On 2020-10-12 17:30, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
Hi All,

Are green beans very difficult to grow? (Keep in
mind my black thumb.)


er, well, some can be and others aren't as much but
it is going to depend upon your climate and soil.

here i have certain varieties that have done well
over the years and others that struggle (planted right
next to each other in the same soil so they are
treated the same in terms of climate and watering).

the hard part there is going to be how to get 50-60
days before it gets really hot out as i think then the
plants may have a hard time setting pods and keeping
them - but perhaps this variety will hold up longer.
dunno until you try.


Found these with a 50 day maturity:

https://www.burpee.com/vegetables/be...rod000579.html

No strings either.


wish they had pictures of the seeds.


songbird


Oh, are the sprouts large or tiny. My earwigs eat
the tiny ones but leave zucchini sprout alone
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Old 13-10-2020, 12:51 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

T wrote:
....
Oh, are the sprouts large or tiny. My earwigs eat
the tiny ones but leave zucchini sprout alone


sprouts are about 3mm across, start them in 1 gallon
containers early and plant them out when the weather
gets warm enough and you can get a jump start on the
season.

ear wig traps can thin out the population.


songbird


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Old 14-10-2020, 12:48 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

On 2020-10-13 03:51, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
Oh, are the sprouts large or tiny. My earwigs eat
the tiny ones but leave zucchini sprout alone


sprouts are about 3mm across, start them in 1 gallon
containers early and plant them out when the weather
gets warm enough and you can get a jump start on the
season.

ear wig traps can thin out the population.


songbird


3 mm will keep the little bugger away!

Thank you!

Oh, does the term "bush beans" mean to trellises?

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Old 14-10-2020, 05:18 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

T wrote:
....
Oh, does the term "bush beans" mean to trellises?


no support should be needed at first but as the
plants get bigger they can fall over if they have
a lot of beans on them and the wind/rain is strong
enough or as they get older and begin to die off
then the roots will not support the plant any more
and it can fall over.

since you aren't interested in much of a dry bean
harvest pick off the beans before they get too old
and eat them. a few pods can be left to get seeds
to full size and then you can remove those for seed
saving for the next year(s) plantings.


songbird
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Old 14-10-2020, 06:33 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

On 2020-10-13 20:18, songbird wrote:
T wrote:
...
Oh, does the term "bush beans" mean to trellises?


no support should be needed at first but as the
plants get bigger they can fall over if they have
a lot of beans on them and the wind/rain is strong
enough or as they get older and begin to die off
then the roots will not support the plant any more
and it can fall over.

since you aren't interested in much of a dry bean
harvest pick off the beans before they get too old
and eat them. a few pods can be left to get seeds
to full size and then you can remove those for seed
saving for the next year(s) plantings.


songbird


Thank you!
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Old 20-10-2020, 05:29 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

wrote:
....
Just as other legumes, green beans are nitrogen "fixers" which simply
means that¬ówith a little help from some friends¬óbeans can take
atmospheric nitrogen (N2) from the air and convert it to ammonium (N4),
a form useful to the plant. Some legumes can be induced to support more
of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria than needed, allowing some of them and
of the nitrogen to remain in the soil. There's more to it than I've
stated but the process isn't complex or expensive.


some of the more modern beans have had this trait largely
reduced or eliminated as i'm finding in my own growing of
many varieties. some do not have many or any nodules at all
on the roots and others have plenty.


....
It sometimes seems that everything that has a mouth likes bean
plants. Down here, major culprits are cutworms, grasshoppersand "root
knot" nematodes. Each of those may be controlled with "naturral"
pesticides.


some of the bean plants here have been chewed off by
cutworms this season when i started out and i replanted
those. i could not find the culprit but i did get
enough plants to sprout to get some seeds back which is
why i was growing those particular plants.

what was interesting to me this season was that the
north garden (which doesn't have a fence around it) did
pretty well even if some of the bean plants were chewed
off by deer, rabbits or groundhogs.

the other day i weighed just one type of bean i grew and
it totaled over 23lbs with 12lbs coming from that one
garden (i don't keep track of how many beans i pick fresh
from the gardens so we did pick and eat some fresh beans
and also several pounds of shellies). for a very small
bean that is a large number of seeds. they're good eating
so we'll keep growing them as they're more reliable than
the pinto beans i've grown in the past.


songbird
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Old 20-10-2020, 05:50 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

On 2020-10-19 16:31, wrote:
It sometimes seems that everything that has a mouth likes bean
plants.


My worst is earwigs! I am constantly killing as
many as I can and they still eat everything in sight.

Found a hot pepper last week with an earwig inside.
Ruined the thing. And I could not find how he got inside!


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Old 20-10-2020, 05:51 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Green beans?

On 2020-10-19 20:50, T wrote:
On 2020-10-19 16:31, wrote:
It sometimes seems that everything that has a mouth likes bean
plants.


My worst is earwigs!¬* I am¬* constantly killing as
many as I can and they still eat everything in sight.

Found a hot pepper last week with an earwig inside.
Ruined the thing.¬* And I could not find how he got inside!


And the come out at night in hordes!



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