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Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
Jason
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

Hey folks, I built my DIY yeast co2 injector for my 63 gal tank, it works
great! just used a 2 liter bottle, tubing, fine airstone w/ check valve...
Each concoction produces co2 for about a week and a half... I am very happy
with it

So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to get a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI range) I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!

-Jason



  #2   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
Trygve Lillefosse
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to get a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI range) I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!


The pressure will not be able to build up since it will go out the
airstone. Would'nt be to concerned.

SEE YA !!!

Malawi, The Fisher King - Ruler Of The World
Conquering the world for YOU since 1972.
  #3   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
Phil Williamson
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

can you send me your plans and possibly a picture of your co2 injector?

Regards,

Phil..

"Jason @hotmail.com" jasonjudkinsspamremoval wrote in message
. com...
Hey folks, I built my DIY yeast co2 injector for my 63 gal tank, it works
great! just used a 2 liter bottle, tubing, fine airstone w/ check valve...
Each concoction produces co2 for about a week and a half... I am very

happy
with it

So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to get

a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI range)

I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!

-Jason




  #4   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
kush
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

Plans? We don't need no steenkin' plans!

Poke a hole in the cap of a 2-liter soda bottle, insert some tubing and
seal it with aquarium sealant. Wait a couple of days for it to set. Put
1.5 cups of sugar, 1/2 tsp. yeast and a pinch of baking soda (optional) in
the bottle and fill to the shoulder with warm-not-hot water. Shake
vigorously. Screw the cap on the bottle and insert the other end of the
tube wherever you want the CO2 to go i.e., filter intake, powerhead,
airstone, diffusing chamber. Wait an hour or so for the bubbles to start.
Lasts approximately two weeks.

If the bottle is going to be lower than the tank, for instance in a cabinet
underneath, you probably want to put a one-way valve on the tubing.

kush

Phil Williamson wrote in message
...
can you send me your plans and possibly a picture of your co2 injector?

Regards,

Phil..

"Jason @hotmail.com" jasonjudkinsspamremoval wrote in message
. com...
Hey folks, I built my DIY yeast co2 injector for my 63 gal tank, it

works
great! just used a 2 liter bottle, tubing, fine airstone w/ check

valve...
Each concoction produces co2 for about a week and a half... I am very

happy
with it

So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to

get
a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI

range)
I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped

on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!

-Jason






  #5   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
kush
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

Whoops! You weren't asking for MY plans. Sorry. I type faster than I read.

kush wrote in message
...
Plans? We don't need no steenkin' plans!

Poke a hole in the cap of a 2-liter soda bottle, insert some tubing and
seal it with aquarium sealant. Wait a couple of days for it to set. Put
1.5 cups of sugar, 1/2 tsp. yeast and a pinch of baking soda (optional) in
the bottle and fill to the shoulder with warm-not-hot water. Shake
vigorously. Screw the cap on the bottle and insert the other end of the
tube wherever you want the CO2 to go i.e., filter intake, powerhead,
airstone, diffusing chamber. Wait an hour or so for the bubbles to start.
Lasts approximately two weeks.

If the bottle is going to be lower than the tank, for instance in a

cabinet
underneath, you probably want to put a one-way valve on the tubing.

kush

Phil Williamson wrote in message
...
can you send me your plans and possibly a picture of your co2 injector?

Regards,

Phil..

"Jason @hotmail.com" jasonjudkinsspamremoval wrote in message
. com...
Hey folks, I built my DIY yeast co2 injector for my 63 gal tank, it

works
great! just used a 2 liter bottle, tubing, fine airstone w/ check

valve...
Each concoction produces co2 for about a week and a half... I am very

happy
with it

So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to

get
a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI

range)
I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped

on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!

-Jason










  #6   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
wiggywacker
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

Do you think it's ok that the outlet of the co2 concoction gets piped into
the inlet of an air pump?

That's what I've just done today...can't find an easier way to get the co2
into the tank otherwise. Actually I've used two pieces of tubing out from
the bottle and it rests underneath the air pump near the inlet, and I
removed the air filter too to give easier intake.

The powerhead is internal =/
But I've ordered a special valve that will suck air and mix it in a chamber
with the water from the outlet, and it will jet very fine bubbles into the
aquarium...so I think I can do it with the co2 going into the valve
directly. The valve is called an "Air Ventura" from Juwel
www.juwelaquarium.de





"kush" wrote in message
...
Plans? We don't need no steenkin' plans!

Poke a hole in the cap of a 2-liter soda bottle, insert some tubing and
seal it with aquarium sealant. Wait a couple of days for it to set. Put
1.5 cups of sugar, 1/2 tsp. yeast and a pinch of baking soda (optional) in
the bottle and fill to the shoulder with warm-not-hot water. Shake
vigorously. Screw the cap on the bottle and insert the other end of the
tube wherever you want the CO2 to go i.e., filter intake, powerhead,
airstone, diffusing chamber. Wait an hour or so for the bubbles to start.
Lasts approximately two weeks.

If the bottle is going to be lower than the tank, for instance in a

cabinet
underneath, you probably want to put a one-way valve on the tubing.

kush

Phil Williamson wrote in message
...
can you send me your plans and possibly a picture of your co2 injector?

Regards,

Phil..

"Jason @hotmail.com" jasonjudkinsspamremoval wrote in message
. com...
Hey folks, I built my DIY yeast co2 injector for my 63 gal tank, it

works
great! just used a 2 liter bottle, tubing, fine airstone w/ check

valve...
Each concoction produces co2 for about a week and a half... I am very

happy
with it

So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to

get
a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI

range)
I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped

on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!

-Jason








  #7   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
Brian C. Attwood
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

wiggywacker wrote:
Do you think it's ok that the outlet of the co2 concoction gets piped into
the inlet of an air pump?

That's what I've just done today...can't find an easier way to get the co2
into the tank otherwise. Actually I've used two pieces of tubing out from
the bottle and it rests underneath the air pump near the inlet, and I
removed the air filter too to give easier intake.

The powerhead is internal =/
But I've ordered a special valve that will suck air and mix it in a chamber
with the water from the outlet, and it will jet very fine bubbles into the
aquarium...so I think I can do it with the co2 going into the valve
directly. The valve is called an "Air Ventura" from Juwel
www.juwelaquarium.de



The problem I see with air pump approach is that if you dilute the CO2
with air, you are going to reduce the amount that diffuses into the
water. If this is just a temporary measure until you get the venturi
adapter for your powerhead, then I wouldn't worry about it too much.
Using the venturi valve to inject pure CO2 (without additional air) into
the tank would definitely be better than using the air pump.

Brian

  #8   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
wiggywacker
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

VenturI
God, I've seen to many Jim Carrey movies.

Thanks for your answer Brian.......
Now I see that there is also a co2 reactor available from Juwel.....
Hmmmmmmmmmm

to bubble or not to bubble.



"Brian C. Attwood" wrote in message
...
wiggywacker wrote:
Do you think it's ok that the outlet of the co2 concoction gets piped

into
the inlet of an air pump?

That's what I've just done today...can't find an easier way to get the

co2
into the tank otherwise. Actually I've used two pieces of tubing out

from
the bottle and it rests underneath the air pump near the inlet, and I
removed the air filter too to give easier intake.

The powerhead is internal =/
But I've ordered a special valve that will suck air and mix it in a

chamber
with the water from the outlet, and it will jet very fine bubbles into

the
aquarium...so I think I can do it with the co2 going into the valve
directly. The valve is called an "Air Ventura" from Juwel
www.juwelaquarium.de



The problem I see with air pump approach is that if you dilute the CO2
with air, you are going to reduce the amount that diffuses into the
water. If this is just a temporary measure until you get the venturi
adapter for your powerhead, then I wouldn't worry about it too much.
Using the venturi valve to inject pure CO2 (without additional air) into
the tank would definitely be better than using the air pump.

Brian



  #9   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
Jason
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

Yes but I am looking for a blow valve as a precaution against the
possibility of the airstone getting clogged and causing my 2 liter bottle to
explode (I have seen pictures and read postings on this happening.) Since I
have read interest from people I will describe my setup, and I will post a
picture of it later (although its pretty simple)

1) Get 2 liter bottle (I got a $.49 seltzer water bottle since its clear)
2) Drilled 1/4 hole in top of cap and silicon sealed tubing inside of it
3) Since my co2 reactor will be beneath my tank, I have installed a
check-valve on the line to prevent reverse-siphoning
4) Recipe I put in bottle is 6 cups water (~1.5 liters) 1 cup sugar, 1/4
tspn baking soda, and 1 tspn of yeast (NOT the instant yeast, but bakers
yeast) (I might add that the baking soda DOES help in the co2 production)

I run the airstone end of the tube down to the bottom of my aquariium and
anchor it there with one of my rocks.

For those of you who suggest running the co2 outtake to a powerhead... DONT
DO IT... this is for the simple fact that even a very small powerhead will
pull more air that the co2 reactor can provide, this results in a very good
probability that your 2 liter bottle will collapse from pressure. (Thus
sucking that nasty concoction into your tank and probably killing some
fish/plants) It is best to put the the airstone underneath a flow of water
so it circulates within the tank and has more time to diffuse.

I am making a new co2 reactor that uses an empty wine jug (glass) and has a
bit more solid structure.... This is the reason I am looking for a blow
valve is so I can make sure that too much pressure doesn't build... I might
just use a rubber stopper (with a copper tube coming out of it... easily
aquired at a scientific supply type store) and a check valve... but the
benefit would be a bigger water/sugar/yeast concoction that produces more
co2

"Trygve Lillefosse" wrote in message
...
So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to get

a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI range)

I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!


The pressure will not be able to build up since it will go out the
airstone. Would'nt be to concerned.

SEE YA !!!

Malawi, The Fisher King - Ruler Of The World
Conquering the world for YOU since 1972.



  #10   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
Alan Silver
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

In article , Jason
writes
Yes but I am looking for a blow valve as a precaution against the
possibility of the airstone getting clogged and causing my 2 liter
bottle to explode


If you are using a standard plastic soda/lemonade bottle, then I
wouldn't worry. They are designed to a) withstand far greater pressures
than your DIY CO2 set up can produce and b) allow excess gas to seep
through, preventing explosions.

Think about it, the gas produce by even mildly shaking a new lemonade
bottle is way more than any DIY CO2 set up can manage.

(I have seen pictures and read postings on this happening.)


Have you actually seen any confirmed reports of this happening ? In all
my years of using these newsgroups (about six or seven I think), I don't
remember ever seeing an actual confirmed report of explosion. I've seen
a few scare stories, plenty of hypothesis and so on, but no confirmed
reports.

And if they were any, it would almost certainly be due to a poor set up.
As mentioned above, a plastic bottle shouldn't gve any cause for worry.

Finally, my DIY CO2 set up has a plastic bung in the bottle. This can be
removed fairly easily (which is how I renew the mixture). If the
pressure were to build up in there, the bung would pop out long before
we got anywhere near an explosion. Again, a small amount of common sense
removes all fears from the scaremongers.

HTH

--
Alan Silver
Please remove the "furryferret" if replying by e-mail


  #11   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
kush
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

I recently experienced a near *implosion* when I hooked my plastic soda
bottle up to the venturi on my powerhead for the first time. There was just
enough suction produced to partially collapse the flimsy plastic. Problem
was easily corrected by using a sturdier juice bottle. Other than that, no
problems of my own, or of others, that I know of in many years of using DIY
setups.

kush

Alan Silver
wrote in
message
...
In article , Jason
writes
Yes but I am looking for a blow valve as a precaution against the
possibility of the airstone getting clogged and causing my 2 liter
bottle to explode


If you are using a standard plastic soda/lemonade bottle, then I
wouldn't worry. They are designed to a) withstand far greater pressures
than your DIY CO2 set up can produce and b) allow excess gas to seep
through, preventing explosions.

Think about it, the gas produce by even mildly shaking a new lemonade
bottle is way more than any DIY CO2 set up can manage.

(I have seen pictures and read postings on this happening.)


Have you actually seen any confirmed reports of this happening ? In all
my years of using these newsgroups (about six or seven I think), I don't
remember ever seeing an actual confirmed report of explosion. I've seen
a few scare stories, plenty of hypothesis and so on, but no confirmed
reports.

And if they were any, it would almost certainly be due to a poor set up.
As mentioned above, a plastic bottle shouldn't gve any cause for worry.

Finally, my DIY CO2 set up has a plastic bung in the bottle. This can be
removed fairly easily (which is how I renew the mixture). If the
pressure were to build up in there, the bung would pop out long before
we got anywhere near an explosion. Again, a small amount of common sense
removes all fears from the scaremongers.

HTH

--
Alan Silver
Please remove the "furryferret" if replying by e-mail



  #12   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
redled
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

Just a quick comment to those who run DIY CO2 underneath your tank. I think
everyone knows you should have a chack valve in this case to prevent
accidental siphoning. Now, the situation I'm about to propose is highly
unlikely but nevertheless very avoidable so I think it's worth mentioning. If
your tank somehow starts to siphon via your CO2 line, and the check valve is
installed BELOW the waterline of your tank, and is on the OUTSIDE of your tank
and the check valve fails or pops off, then possibly the tank could start
siphoning. I know this would probably never happen but to be safe I always
install the check valve inside the tank or above the waterline.

In article , "Jason"
wrote:
Yes but I am looking for a blow valve as a precaution against the
possibility of the airstone getting clogged and causing my 2 liter bottle to
explode (I have seen pictures and read postings on this happening.) Since I
have read interest from people I will describe my setup, and I will post a
picture of it later (although its pretty simple)

1) Get 2 liter bottle (I got a $.49 seltzer water bottle since its clear)
2) Drilled 1/4 hole in top of cap and silicon sealed tubing inside of it
3) Since my co2 reactor will be beneath my tank, I have installed a
check-valve on the line to prevent reverse-siphoning
4) Recipe I put in bottle is 6 cups water (~1.5 liters) 1 cup sugar, 1/4
tspn baking soda, and 1 tspn of yeast (NOT the instant yeast, but bakers
yeast) (I might add that the baking soda DOES help in the co2 production)

I run the airstone end of the tube down to the bottom of my aquariium and
anchor it there with one of my rocks.

For those of you who suggest running the co2 outtake to a powerhead... DONT
DO IT... this is for the simple fact that even a very small powerhead will
pull more air that the co2 reactor can provide, this results in a very good
probability that your 2 liter bottle will collapse from pressure. (Thus
sucking that nasty concoction into your tank and probably killing some
fish/plants) It is best to put the the airstone underneath a flow of water
so it circulates within the tank and has more time to diffuse.

I am making a new co2 reactor that uses an empty wine jug (glass) and has a
bit more solid structure.... This is the reason I am looking for a blow
valve is so I can make sure that too much pressure doesn't build... I might
just use a rubber stopper (with a copper tube coming out of it... easily
aquired at a scientific supply type store) and a check valve... but the
benefit would be a bigger water/sugar/yeast concoction that produces more
co2

"Trygve Lillefosse" wrote in message
...
So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to get

a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI range)

I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!


The pressure will not be able to build up since it will go out the
airstone. Would'nt be to concerned.

SEE YA !!!

Malawi, The Fisher King - Ruler Of The World
Conquering the world for YOU since 1972.




__
"Insert witty comment here."
-John
  #13   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
Mark Trueman
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

"kush" wrote in message ...
I recently experienced a near *implosion* when I hooked my plastic soda
bottle up to the venturi on my powerhead for the first time. There was just
enough suction produced to partially collapse the flimsy plastic. Problem
was easily corrected by using a sturdier juice bottle. Other than that, no
problems of my own, or of others, that I know of in many years of using DIY
setups.

kush


Here's what i do.

From the co2 reactor i have a tube that goes into a "bell" which is
the bottom couple of inches from a cola bottle, upturned in my tank.
The tubing from the reactor enters through the center of this bell at
the top. This is the standard way of doing things i think. What i have
also done is put a tube in the side of the bell that goes to the
venturi on my internal power filter. This does 2 things

1. As the bell fills up with co2, it reaches the point where the hose
from the venturi is, and the venturi sucks the co2 out of the bell to
a level just below that of the pipe in the side. This blasts tiny co2
bubbles throughout the tank which get absorbed.

2. When not sucking co2, the venturi pulls the water below the level
of the co2 through the pipe, thus providing the required water
movement on the co2/water boundry in the bell

Cue bad ascii art.....

tubing from co2 reactor
||
|| @@
/----||-----\ //===================||####### co2 BLAST!!
/ Co2 || \ || pipe to venturi -----
/______||_______\ // | |
/ || ====/ power filter
/ o || H20 \
o
Tube lower than co2 level = bubble counter

It works very well indeed, i get really high co2 levels for a diy,
about 25ppm in a 40 gallon

Hope that helps.

Mark
  #14   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
M Walczak
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

Jason I would suggest going to "the container store" in which they sell,
solvent bottles, ~2l glass bottles which I can attest as a chemist and
personal user for CO2 is the Best container for DIY CO2. Thankfully I can
get them for free.
I am making a new co2 reactor that uses an empty wine jug (glass) and has

a
bit more solid structure.... This is the reason I am looking for a blow
valve is so I can make sure that too much pressure doesn't build... I

might
just use a rubber stopper (with a copper tube coming out of it... easily
aquired at a scientific supply type store) and a check valve... but the
benefit would be a bigger water/sugar/yeast concoction that produces more
co2

"Trygve Lillefosse" wrote in message
...
So here is my question: Does anyone know of a good or common place to

get
a
blow valve? (I.e. a valve that will discharge within a certain PSI

range)
I
would like to make my DIY system fault tolerant, but I am just stumped

on
where to get the blow valve... any ideas? Thanks!


The pressure will not be able to build up since it will go out the
airstone. Would'nt be to concerned.

SEE YA !!!

Malawi, The Fisher King - Ruler Of The World
Conquering the world for YOU since 1972.






  #15   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:14 AM
M Walczak
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY Yeast method materials...

Im sorry for not understanding, but what is a bung Im curious?
"Alan Silver"
wrote in
message
...
In article , Jason
writes
Yes but I am looking for a blow valve as a precaution against the
possibility of the airstone getting clogged and causing my 2 liter
bottle to explode


If you are using a standard plastic soda/lemonade bottle, then I
wouldn't worry. They are designed to a) withstand far greater pressures
than your DIY CO2 set up can produce and b) allow excess gas to seep
through, preventing explosions.

Think about it, the gas produce by even mildly shaking a new lemonade
bottle is way more than any DIY CO2 set up can manage.

(I have seen pictures and read postings on this happening.)


Have you actually seen any confirmed reports of this happening ? In all
my years of using these newsgroups (about six or seven I think), I don't
remember ever seeing an actual confirmed report of explosion. I've seen
a few scare stories, plenty of hypothesis and so on, but no confirmed
reports.

And if they were any, it would almost certainly be due to a poor set up.
As mentioned above, a plastic bottle shouldn't gve any cause for worry.

Finally, my DIY CO2 set up has a plastic bung in the bottle. This can be
removed fairly easily (which is how I renew the mixture). If the
pressure were to build up in there, the bung would pop out long before
we got anywhere near an explosion. Again, a small amount of common sense
removes all fears from the scaremongers.

HTH

--
Alan Silver
Please remove the "furryferret" if replying by e-mail





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