Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
dpots
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

I am setting up a new 60g plant tank and want to try to us CO2. Is a
DIY set up appropriate for this size aquarium. If so, what type of
DIY set up do you recommend (recipe, bottles, tubing, ...). My LFS
sells the Nutrafin CO2 system for $30 and I was considering purchasing
it just for the diffuser and tubing? Good or bad idea?

Leigh, if you read this message, I think your posts are very
informative and your web page link is great-THANKS!

Thanks, dpots

  #2   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
LeighMo
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

Leigh, if you read this message, I think your posts are very
informative and your web page link is great-THANKS!


Thanks!

As for CO2...you'll find as many recipes for DIY CO2 as there are people who
use it. For a 60 g tank, you will probably want to run two bottles (staggered,
so one is reaching its peak while the other is petering out). And many people
prefer wine yeasts for steady, long-term CO2 production, as opposed to bread
yeast. Use large glass juice bottles instead of plastic soda bottles. They
are lower and heavier, and less liable to tip. I think most people use that
greenish silicon tubing. It leaks less than regular vinyl tubing. There's
also special CO2 tubing, but it's expensive and not commonly available.

A lot of people like the Nutrafin system's diffuser. If you want to buy it for
that, though, consider buying online. Pet Solutions has it for $19.99.


Leigh

http://www.fortunecity.com/lavender/halloween/881/
  #3   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
Jim Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

i second leighmo's tip on the juice bottle. it makes a huge difference in
stability...

my recommendation is to make a glueless attachment of the co2 line to the
top by drilling a hole smaller than the line in the center of the top, cut
the line on an angle and then poke/pull it through the hole with a pair of
pliers. this will make a leakproof fitting without the need for glues which
always end up leaking after a time.

good luck

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies


  #4   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
Jason
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

I use a 1gal wine jug (glass) for my DIY method... Basically you can buy a
cheap jug of wine for about $6, get a stopper at Ace hardware for about
$1.70, tubing for about $2, and the DIY recipe ingrediants. (about $4 which
will last a year or more) I also bought a Tetrafin check valve since I have
my bottle in the tank stand (these cost about $2) (this prevents resverse
siphoning).

Anyway, the options are really limitless, but here is the recipe for DIY
co2:

for a 2 litre bottle concoction:
6 cups water
2 cups sugar
1 tspn yeast (NOT the quick rise stuff, but either bakers or brewers yeast)

for a 1 gal container:
~12 cups of water (fill until a little over 3/4 full)
4 cups sugar
2 tspn yeast. (again, NOT the quick rise crap)

These concoctions should last about 2 weeks per batch. If you use this in a
60 gal aquarium (mine is 63gal), MAKE SURE you have a co2 test kit handy...
I found out after a couple of weeks that my co2 levels were in excess of
50ppm which is toxic for fish...

-Jason

"dpots" wrote in message
om...
I am setting up a new 60g plant tank and want to try to us CO2. Is a
DIY set up appropriate for this size aquarium. If so, what type of
DIY set up do you recommend (recipe, bottles, tubing, ...). My LFS
sells the Nutrafin CO2 system for $30 and I was considering purchasing
it just for the diffuser and tubing? Good or bad idea?

Leigh, if you read this message, I think your posts are very
informative and your web page link is great-THANKS!

Thanks, dpots



  #5   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
redled
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

Yeah, I second that. MUch easier and works way way better in the long run.

In article , "Jim Miller"
wrote:
i second leighmo's tip on the juice bottle. it makes a huge difference in
stability...

my recommendation is to make a glueless attachment of the co2 line to the
top by drilling a hole smaller than the line in the center of the top, cut
the line on an angle and then poke/pull it through the hole with a pair of
pliers. this will make a leakproof fitting without the need for glues which
always end up leaking after a time.

good luck

jtm


__
"Insert witty comment here."
-John


  #6   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
SlimFlem
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

What is the best way to control the output of bubbles on DIY units? Don't
you need to watch your PH levels and adjust bubble flow? How would you do
it with this type of setup?

"Jason" wrote in message
...
I use a 1gal wine jug (glass) for my DIY method... Basically you can buy a
cheap jug of wine for about $6, get a stopper at Ace hardware for about
$1.70, tubing for about $2, and the DIY recipe ingrediants. (about $4

which
will last a year or more) I also bought a Tetrafin check valve since I

have
my bottle in the tank stand (these cost about $2) (this prevents resverse
siphoning).

Anyway, the options are really limitless, but here is the recipe for DIY
co2:

for a 2 litre bottle concoction:
6 cups water
2 cups sugar
1 tspn yeast (NOT the quick rise stuff, but either bakers or brewers

yeast)

for a 1 gal container:
~12 cups of water (fill until a little over 3/4 full)
4 cups sugar
2 tspn yeast. (again, NOT the quick rise crap)

These concoctions should last about 2 weeks per batch. If you use this in

a
60 gal aquarium (mine is 63gal), MAKE SURE you have a co2 test kit

handy...
I found out after a couple of weeks that my co2 levels were in excess of
50ppm which is toxic for fish...

-Jason

"dpots" wrote in message
om...
I am setting up a new 60g plant tank and want to try to us CO2. Is a
DIY set up appropriate for this size aquarium. If so, what type of
DIY set up do you recommend (recipe, bottles, tubing, ...). My LFS
sells the Nutrafin CO2 system for $30 and I was considering purchasing
it just for the diffuser and tubing? Good or bad idea?

Leigh, if you read this message, I think your posts are very
informative and your web page link is great-THANKS!

Thanks, dpots





  #7   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
Jim Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

controlling the output by restricting the flow isn't a great idea for a
variety of reasons. you're better off adjusting the co2 concentration by the
efficiency of your diffuser or perhaps the size of your bottle.

btw, adding too much yeast at the start will get production started at a
high level and depending on your brew and yeast type cause a quick fall off
thereafter. yeast population will grow over time so adding too much at the
start is a bit of a waste. use the minimum necessary to start co2 production
at a comfortable level.

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"SlimFlem" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
What is the best way to control the output of bubbles on DIY units? Don't
you need to watch your PH levels and adjust bubble flow? How would you do
it with this type of setup?



  #9   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
Owen Graupman
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

I'd like to add my $.02 worth on DIY systems...

Here's my recipe for a more (IMHO) successful DIY CO2. Since switching to
this method, I've had far better success with DIY CO2. Instead of changing
bottles every two weeks or so, I'm changing them every 6 to 8 weeks.

Use a small plastic soda bottle. I bought a 6 pack of 24oz Wild Cherry
Pepsi's. The 1-liter bottles also work well, but don't use anything larger!
Drill a hole in the top and insert a silicone air line just like you would
for a 2 liter bottle. I like to seal the airline with silicone just to make
certain there's no leaks. I discovered a while ago that after a time, the
silicone would leak around the edges of the joint if I didn't.

For my yeast recipe, put a little warm water in the bottom of the bottle
(about 1/4 cup) and add 1/4 teaspoon of yeast to the mixture (BTW, I've
discovered no difference between the quick-rise, bakers and champagne yeast
using this method). Cap the bottle and shake well to mix the yeast. Now fill
the bottle half full with sugar, then about 1/4 full with water and a dash
of baking powder. That should leave about 1/4 full of air. Gently invert the
bottle a few times to make sure all the sugar is wet, but _not_ dissolved.
Leave the bottle in a sink or tub for a couple of days, so that when the
yeast starts reacting, any overflow doesn't make a mess. Attach to an
airline with a check valve and an airstone at the end and place so the
bubbles get swirled around by the filter outflow. For the check valve, I use
one's I found at Petsmart that have a small chamber filled with filter
floss, which acts as a miniature drop container (for the occasional bubble
that goes up the tube).

Each bottle puts out about enough CO2 to keep a heavily planted 20-30 gallon
tank at around 15ppm and in my home tanks (2 20gals, 2 30gals and a 5) they
last around 7 weeks (some only six, some up to 8). If you have a larger
tank, add more bottles.

I built a bracket for the bottles on the inside of my stands, so I don't
have to worry about them getting knocked over and hence, don't use any sort
of drip container in case the mixture overflows. If you decide to use one on
your setup, I recommend using a tiny container (I like those miniature water
bottles I get on airplane flights), otherwise the mixture will peter out
sooner.

Well, FWIW...
-Owen Graupman

"Jason" wrote in message
...
I use a 1gal wine jug (glass) for my DIY method... Basically you can buy a
cheap jug of wine for about $6, get a stopper at Ace hardware for about
$1.70, tubing for about $2, and the DIY recipe ingrediants. (about $4

which
will last a year or more) I also bought a Tetrafin check valve since I

have
my bottle in the tank stand (these cost about $2) (this prevents resverse
siphoning).

Anyway, the options are really limitless, but here is the recipe for DIY
co2:

for a 2 litre bottle concoction:
6 cups water
2 cups sugar
1 tspn yeast (NOT the quick rise stuff, but either bakers or brewers

yeast)

for a 1 gal container:
~12 cups of water (fill until a little over 3/4 full)
4 cups sugar
2 tspn yeast. (again, NOT the quick rise crap)

These concoctions should last about 2 weeks per batch. If you use this in

a
60 gal aquarium (mine is 63gal), MAKE SURE you have a co2 test kit

handy...
I found out after a couple of weeks that my co2 levels were in excess of
50ppm which is toxic for fish...

-Jason

"dpots" wrote in message
om...
I am setting up a new 60g plant tank and want to try to us CO2. Is a
DIY set up appropriate for this size aquarium. If so, what type of
DIY set up do you recommend (recipe, bottles, tubing, ...). My LFS
sells the Nutrafin CO2 system for $30 and I was considering purchasing
it just for the diffuser and tubing? Good or bad idea?

Leigh, if you read this message, I think your posts are very
informative and your web page link is great-THANKS!

Thanks, dpots






  #10   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
SlimFlem
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

Question, I want to start some CO2 tomorrow so I am going to make 2 DIY
bottles for my 75. I saw on this site,
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/H...37/index.html, that the airtube
can be stuck in a powerhead. It seems like since the "air port" on the
powerhead sucks air in, it would also suck from the CO2 bottle. Will the
check valve prevent this? I would like to do this, but need some more
experienced person to tell me about this method first.

thanks.

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
controlling the output by restricting the flow isn't a great idea for a
variety of reasons. you're better off adjusting the co2 concentration by

the
efficiency of your diffuser or perhaps the size of your bottle.

btw, adding too much yeast at the start will get production started at a
high level and depending on your brew and yeast type cause a quick fall

off
thereafter. yeast population will grow over time so adding too much at the
start is a bit of a waste. use the minimum necessary to start co2

production
at a comfortable level.

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"SlimFlem" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
What is the best way to control the output of bubbles on DIY units? Don't
you need to watch your PH levels and adjust bubble flow? How would you do
it with this type of setup?







  #11   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
SlimFlem
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

"use the minimum necessary to start co2 production at a comfortable level."

Jim, what is your minimum level mixture and what size tank do you have? How
many bottles do you use at once to give a comfortable level? How often are
you checking PH?

Thanks,

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
controlling the output by restricting the flow isn't a great idea for a
variety of reasons. you're better off adjusting the co2 concentration by

the
efficiency of your diffuser or perhaps the size of your bottle.

btw, adding too much yeast at the start will get production started at a
high level and depending on your brew and yeast type cause a quick fall

off
thereafter. yeast population will grow over time so adding too much at the
start is a bit of a waste. use the minimum necessary to start co2

production
at a comfortable level.

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"SlimFlem" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
What is the best way to control the output of bubbles on DIY units? Don't
you need to watch your PH levels and adjust bubble flow? How would you do
it with this type of setup?





  #12   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
kush
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

Important note: If you use the venturi on your powerhead, do not repeat not
use a flimsy soda bottle! The powehead is just powerful enough to partially
collapse it. I am too embarrassed to repeat my story again, so just trust
me and use a juice bottle.

The check valve will not prevent the powerhead from drawing CO2 from the
bottle. When you first start it up, there will be a lot of bubbles as the
venturi evacuates air from the bottle. This will actually accelerate the
transition from aerobic to anaerobic CO2 production (a good thing or, at
least, not a bad thing).

kush

SlimFlem wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Question, I want to start some CO2 tomorrow so I am going to make 2 DIY
bottles for my 75. I saw on this site,
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/H...37/index.html, that the airtube
can be stuck in a powerhead. It seems like since the "air port" on the
powerhead sucks air in, it would also suck from the CO2 bottle. Will the
check valve prevent this? I would like to do this, but need some more
experienced person to tell me about this method first.

thanks.

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
controlling the output by restricting the flow isn't a great idea for a
variety of reasons. you're better off adjusting the co2 concentration by

the
efficiency of your diffuser or perhaps the size of your bottle.

btw, adding too much yeast at the start will get production started at a
high level and depending on your brew and yeast type cause a quick fall

off
thereafter. yeast population will grow over time so adding too much at

the
start is a bit of a waste. use the minimum necessary to start co2

production
at a comfortable level.

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"SlimFlem" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
What is the best way to control the output of bubbles on DIY units?

Don't
you need to watch your PH levels and adjust bubble flow? How would you

do
it with this type of setup?







  #13   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
kush
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

May I?

Rule of thumb: one 2-liter soda bottle per 25 gallons. Basic recipe: to
each two liter soda bottle, 1-1/2 cups sugar, 1/4 teaspoon yeast and enough
warm-not-hot water to fill to the shoulder, 1/8 teaspoon baking soda
optional.

kush

SlimFlem wrote in message
news:[email protected]
"use the minimum necessary to start co2 production at a comfortable

level."

Jim, what is your minimum level mixture and what size tank do you have?

How
many bottles do you use at once to give a comfortable level? How often

are
you checking PH?

Thanks,

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
controlling the output by restricting the flow isn't a great idea for a
variety of reasons. you're better off adjusting the co2 concentration by

the
efficiency of your diffuser or perhaps the size of your bottle.

btw, adding too much yeast at the start will get production started at a
high level and depending on your brew and yeast type cause a quick fall

off
thereafter. yeast population will grow over time so adding too much at

the
start is a bit of a waste. use the minimum necessary to start co2

production
at a comfortable level.

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"SlimFlem" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
What is the best way to control the output of bubbles on DIY units?

Don't
you need to watch your PH levels and adjust bubble flow? How would you

do
it with this type of setup?







  #14   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
Jim Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

i've currently got a 46oz bottle which i use 1.5 cups sugar and a half
teaspoon of yeast and a pinch of baking soda in. i don't worry much about
the proportions since it always runs for a bit less than two weeks and i
just change it when i do my bi-weekly water changes. i'm sure if i cared to
i could optimize this but it just isn't worth it to me.

i used to check my co2 levels daily until i decided they don't go too high
and they just dwindle away when the bubble rate gets too low.

i run my co2 directly into the intake of my system3 which is really simple.
i was fiddling around with diffusers and had settled on the Rena 2" when i
discovered that the System3 impeller did a sufficient job with nothing
additional in the tank. the rena was definitely better however. i tried
limewood diffusers and a variety of "airstones" but the rena was by far the
best. it produced a pretty mist of bubbles; very nice. now that i've got a
different plant arrangement in the tank i may actually go back to using it.
if you decide to use the rena make sure to trim the little rubber gasket lip
at the top since it tends to collect some of the mist into larger bubbles.

my system 3 is three gallons. i suspect that you'll want a better diffusion
mechanism as well as a 64oz or multiple 64oz bottles if you don't have a
efficient diffuser. the one sold by aquatbotanic looks to be a great way to
go for a larger tank such as yours. i'd stagger the start times for your
bottles and change them every other week.

good luck

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"SlimFlem" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
"use the minimum necessary to start co2 production at a comfortable level."

Jim, what is your minimum level mixture and what size tank do you have? How
many bottles do you use at once to give a comfortable level? How often are
you checking PH?

Thanks,



  #15   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:16 AM
Jim Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default DIY CO2 Instructions?

agreed! i never recommend a soda bottle rather a juice bottle. they have
full width bottoms for stability, wider mouths for filling, less flexible
sides with handholds for carrying. they're also typically shorter for a
given volume which makes them more likely to squat behind your aquarium.

do you really want yeuccky brew on your carpet or in your aquarium thanks to
your cat?

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"kush" wrote in message
...
Important note: If you use the venturi on your powerhead, do not repeat not
use a flimsy soda bottle! The powehead is just powerful enough to partially
collapse it. I am too embarrassed to repeat my story again, so just trust
me and use a juice bottle.





Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DIY Co2 Instructions for a Freshwater Aquarium Planted Tank tropicalfishforum.org Freshwater Aquaria Plants 6 06-01-2007 01:43 PM
FA: DIY CO2 injection system with 5 lb CO2 tank kachunk Freshwater Aquaria Plants 0 22-11-2004 02:07 PM
DIY CO2 Question kush Freshwater Aquaria Plants 8 20-04-2003 06:13 AM
Alternate DIY CO2? alex crouvier Freshwater Aquaria Plants 4 20-04-2003 06:11 AM
Maximum PSI Pressure created by DIY CO2 Harry Muscle Freshwater Aquaria Plants 2 29-03-2003 03:20 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:42 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017