#1   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:21 AM
Richard Krush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Natural aquarium approach?


Hello,

Like Michael mentioned in a reply to my previous thread ("Why won't my
plants grow?"), it wouldn't be very wise of me to spend hundreds of dollars
on equipment and chemicals to keep a few plants in a 20 gallon aquarium.
Incidentally, a book came to me (a friend recommended it) that argues that
natural aquarium is not only much cheaper and easier to maintain, but also
is beneficial to both plants and fish (_Ecology of the Planted Aquarium_,
Diana Walstad, 1999, Echinodorus Publishing). I only started reading the
book yesterday, but so far the author has talked about how fish, bacteria,
and fish food (through fish and bacteria) provide all nutrients needed by
the plants. She also mentions numerous laboratory and practical
experiments that support that.

However, since I have practically no knowledge of biology, chemistry,
botany, or even fish-keeping, I'd like to ask your opinion on the idea of
natural aquarium (i.e. having an almost self-sufficient micro-biosystem
without expensive equipment and chemicals) and what do you think of the
aforementioned book and/or its author. I couldn't find much info on this
approach on the net, hopefully that doesn't mean that nobody has tried it
or is interested in it.

Thanks in advance!

Richard

--
"I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War
IV will be fought with sticks and stones." -- Albert Einstein

  #2   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:21 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Natural aquarium approach?

http://mike-edwardes.members.beeb.net/plant/lotech.html

Most of us prefer the un-natural aquarium, though. Running a natural aquarium
can be a joy -- easy, low-cost, low-maintenance. But there are tradeoffs. The
soils substrates are messy. The lack of mechanical filtration means you have
to be careful about stocking levels. You can't choose the plants you want;
rather, you plant a variety of plants, and let the ones that do well take over.
It can take weeks or months for the tank to find its balance, and while it
does, it can be rather unattractive.

But if you have the discipline and patience for this method, go for it!



Leigh

http://www.fortunecity.com/lavender/halloween/881/


You can substitute Flourite, about 4 inches or so, for the soil and
add about 1/2 inch of peat to the bottom layer along with lots of mulm
from a mature tank. This works better than soil after a year or so. It
also only gets better as it ages and also is far less messy.

Regards,
Tom Barr
  #3   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:21 AM
Mike Edwardes
 
Posts: n/a
Default Natural aquarium approach?

In article ,
Richard Krush wrote:
Like Michael mentioned in a reply to my previous thread ("Why won't my
plants grow?"), it wouldn't be very wise of me to spend hundreds of dollars
on equipment and chemicals to keep a few plants in a 20 gallon aquarium.
Incidentally, a book came to me (a friend recommended it) that argues that
natural aquarium is not only much cheaper and easier to maintain, but also
is beneficial to both plants and fish (_Ecology of the Planted Aquarium_,
Diana Walstad, 1999, Echinodorus Publishing). I only started reading the
book yesterday, but so far the author has talked about how fish, bacteria,
and fish food (through fish and bacteria) provide all nutrients needed by
the plants. She also mentions numerous laboratory and practical
experiments that support that.

However, since I have practically no knowledge of biology, chemistry,
botany, or even fish-keeping, I'd like to ask your opinion on the idea of
natural aquarium (i.e. having an almost self-sufficient micro-biosystem
without expensive equipment and chemicals) and what do you think of the
aforementioned book and/or its author. I couldn't find much info on this
approach on the net, hopefully that doesn't mean that nobody has tried it
or is interested in it.


Yes, some of us have tried it:
http://mike-edwardes.members.beeb.net/plant/lotech.html
Works for me!
High-tech aquaria can look fabulous (been there, done that, although
YMMV), but for a discussion of the disadvantages, see:
http://mike-edwardes.members.beeb.net/plant/hitech.html

Mike.
--
Mike Edwardes Tropicals
http://mike-edwardes.members.beeb.net


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
planted aquarium/natural aquarium red406 Freshwater Aquaria Plants 8 04-05-2011 06:43 PM
Ugly aquarium grass, and what fish to put in a small aquarium robin Freshwater Aquaria Plants 12 22-01-2005 11:17 PM
Keeping a natural area, natural aggiecon Plant Science 2 13-12-2004 07:05 PM
new 125g natural sunlight goldfish aquarium s g Freshwater Aquaria Plants 0 20-04-2003 06:24 AM
new 125g natural sunlight goldfish aquarium s g Freshwater Aquaria Plants 0 06-03-2003 04:03 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017