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Old 20-10-2007, 05:00 AM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.plants
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Default Plant Quality Issues

Howdy Folks,

I have a moderately heavy planted 55g with a few workers, and a
handful of other fish. The tank actually was running with fish for
over a year before any planting was started. The bed is formed of
sand, smaller pebbles, and the a bag of time releasing nutrient stuff
you can buy for plants. Since the initial planting, things have went
somewhat well. The plants seemed to have transplanted well. My Ph
has been moderate, and I have been using occasional liquid fertilizer,
for 2-3 months. The plants seem to have good color, and have shown
some growth, and rooting. I installed a generic Co2 system 1 month
ago. ThisCo2 uses the sugar, and activators mixed together which
states it last up to 30 days a fill. I have done one small water
change (1/6?) with bottled spring water that I treated, and have
always used bottled thunderstorm rainwater for evaporation. My pH
levels seem to still be moderate, and I use two 70g filters. Within
the last 1-2 months, several of the plants have been forming a 'muck'
or 'sandlike' grain on them. Some of the narrow plants, like grasses
are getting covered so heavily it seems they are turning a light
brown. The discuss plant's leaves seem to have several strands or
strings of the sand growing off of them. I can brush or rub the
discuss leaves clean, but a few days later will be, again, covered in
strands. Is this a form of algae, or is this a plant disease? My
filters seem to be effective, and I have replaced the filters
components with new media a few times.

Any suggestions highly appreciated!

Newbie


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Old 22-10-2007, 01:42 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.plants
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Default Plant Quality Issues

It sounds to me like diatom algae. Diatoms are eukariotic single celled
algaes that thrive in silicate rich water. It's a brown algae that looks
like dust or rust and covers anything and everything as it grows. If you are
using rain water for your tanks then the silicates aren't coming from your
water. It's probably because you used silica sand as your substrate instead
of quartzite sand, which has no silicates. You have two options, you can
introduce more janitors to help you which will eat it, or you can break down
the tank and re-do the substrate. The second option is a huge pain but may
be the only way to eliminate diatom algaes from this setup.

The best janitors that I know of for diatom outbreaks in freshwater tanks
are olive nerite snails. Olive nerites are actually a brackish water species
of snail that can survive in freshwater. The advantages they have over other
snails. They don't usually eat green plants (just algaes) unless those
plants have very sensitive or soft leaf structures (ex: Cabomba, Ambula,
etc.). They will however graze diatoms and other algaes off of plant leaves
without harming them. They require brackish water to reproduce, so if you
have them in fresh water, their eggs never mature and develop into baby
snails. This keeps their populations in check. They're tough as nails and
can survive temperatures from 50f to 100f.

They're a small snail, for a 55 gallon tank i'd suggest about a dozen or so.
If you have trouble locating them, surf over to www.franksaquarium.com.
Frank usually has them in stock. I love them, and have them in just about
every tank I have.

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Old 23-10-2007, 12:08 AM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.plants
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Posts: 2
Default Plant Quality Issues

On Oct 22, 8:42 am, "Aiptasia" wrote:
It sounds to me like diatom algae. Diatoms are eukariotic single celled
algaes that thrive in silicate rich water. It's a brown algae that looks
like dust or rust and covers anything and everything as it grows. If you are
using rain water for your tanks then the silicates aren't coming from your
water. It's probably because you used silica sand as your substrate instead
of quartzite sand, which has no silicates. You have two options, you can
introduce more janitors to help you which will eat it, or you can break down
the tank and re-do the substrate. The second option is a huge pain but may
be the only way to eliminate diatom algaes from this setup.

The best janitors that I know of for diatom outbreaks in freshwater tanks
are olive nerite snails. Olive nerites are actually a brackish water species
of snail that can survive in freshwater. The advantages they have over other
snails. They don't usually eat green plants (just algaes) unless those
plants have very sensitive or soft leaf structures (ex: Cabomba, Ambula,
etc.). They will however graze diatoms and other algaes off of plant leaves
without harming them. They require brackish water to reproduce, so if you
have them in fresh water, their eggs never mature and develop into baby
snails. This keeps their populations in check. They're tough as nails and
can survive temperatures from 50f to 100f.

They're a small snail, for a 55 gallon tank i'd suggest about a dozen or so.
If you have trouble locating them, surf over towww.franksaquarium.com.
Frank usually has them in stock. I love them, and have them in just about
every tank I have.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Join me at Petfish.net - Worldwide aquarium community forums.

Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
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Thanks Aiptasia.

I did some research on diatom algae, and I'm almost certain this is my
problem.
I should have done some more research on my substrate. I'm almost
sure it was the sand I used. I will definitly try these nerite snails
before doing the unimaginable. Another person also told me to try a
few Otto Cats with these snails, which may speed up recovery.

Thanks again for the info, and links!
Newbie

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Old 23-11-2007, 03:47 AM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.plants
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Nov 2007
Posts: 1
Default Plant Quality Issues

Hey there,

I had a very bad out break of a hair algae of sorts.
It was every where, and nothing would touch it, not even snails.
Poor fish were even getting caught up in it too!

Then I was turned on to the miracle fish - -
The American Flag Fish!

I put 3 of them into my 30g tank, and it was unbelievable watching this
stuff disappear! In a mater of days, the tank was clean of any strands of
this algae.
The flag fish did not nibble down my plants either.
And they actually are a very pretty & pleasant fish for a community tank.

This was over a year ago & my stock has diminished due to moving.
I have a 'long 40gal' getting ready for display.
I intend to get my local fish supplier to order some of these flag fish in
for me, cause they are not a type you would find easily for sale.
But they are inexpensive.. a couple of bucks...
I don't want to get stuck with out them again.

Now, if I could only grow any other type of plant than a sword.

Regards,
JC




wrote in message
ups.com...
Howdy Folks,

I have a moderately heavy planted 55g with a few workers, and a
handful of other fish. The tank actually was running with fish for
over a year before any planting was started. The bed is formed of
sand, smaller pebbles, and the a bag of time releasing nutrient stuff
you can buy for plants. Since the initial planting, things have went
somewhat well. The plants seemed to have transplanted well. My Ph
has been moderate, and I have been using occasional liquid fertilizer,
for 2-3 months. The plants seem to have good color, and have shown
some growth, and rooting. I installed a generic Co2 system 1 month
ago. ThisCo2 uses the sugar, and activators mixed together which
states it last up to 30 days a fill. I have done one small water
change (1/6?) with bottled spring water that I treated, and have
always used bottled thunderstorm rainwater for evaporation. My pH
levels seem to still be moderate, and I use two 70g filters. Within
the last 1-2 months, several of the plants have been forming a 'muck'
or 'sandlike' grain on them. Some of the narrow plants, like grasses
are getting covered so heavily it seems they are turning a light
brown. The discuss plant's leaves seem to have several strands or
strings of the sand growing off of them. I can brush or rub the
discuss leaves clean, but a few days later will be, again, covered in
strands. Is this a form of algae, or is this a plant disease? My
filters seem to be effective, and I have replaced the filters
components with new media a few times.

Any suggestions highly appreciated!

Newbie





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