GardenBanter.co.uk

GardenBanter.co.uk (https://www.gardenbanter.co.uk/)
-   Freshwater Aquaria Plants (https://www.gardenbanter.co.uk/freshwater-aquaria-plants/)
-   -   Quick Question (https://www.gardenbanter.co.uk/freshwater-aquaria-plants/37046-quick-question.html)

IM MR1DRFL 17-07-2003 09:43 PM

Quick Question
 
Hi All!
I plan on starting a new 10 gallon planted tank this week and I plan
on taking the water out of my 50 gallon planted tank. Do I need to cycle the
ten gallon tank and can I put a few fish in immediately? If not what are some
of the steps that I need to do?

Thank you,
Mike

LeighMo 17-07-2003 09:43 PM

Quick Question
 
Check out this page:

http://www.csd.net/~cgadd/aqua/art_plant_newtank.htm


Leigh

http://www.fortunecity.com/lavender/halloween/881/

Iain Miller 17-07-2003 09:43 PM

Quick Question
 

"IM MR1DRFL" wrote in message
...
Hi All!
I plan on starting a new 10 gallon planted tank this week and I

plan
on taking the water out of my 50 gallon planted tank. Do I need to cycle

the
ten gallon tank and can I put a few fish in immediately? If not what are

some
of the steps that I need to do?



Its the filter that needs to be "cycled". You can shorten this process (to
almost nil) by taking some filter media out of your existing tank. Depends
on what kind of filter you have in there.....if its a UGF then just take
some of the substrate, if its an internal or external filter then take some
filter wool or bio media. If its a sponge based filter & you don't want to
cut the sponges then see if you could cram some additional media into the
filter for a few days (some filter wool or an additional sponge for example)
after a day or two the new media will have been populated with bacteria &
you can remove it to your new tank where it will seed you new filter very
quickly. The bacteria are of course in the water itself (and on every
surface in the tank for that matter) so using mature water will help too but
assuming you took some mature fulter media into the new tank I'd probably
use half old water & half new to get it started.

Bear in mind that the bacteria that live in the filters need ammonia &
nitrites to feed on so you need some source of ammonia in your new tank - if
you put a mature filter into a sterile, clean tank it will actually die
back - so putting a few fish in at the same time is very much the way to go.
Check for ammonia & nitrites for the first week or so - you may never see
any if you do it right.

HTH

I.



Sherry Michael Weller 17-07-2003 09:43 PM

Quick Question
 


Iain Miller wrote:

Bear in mind that the bacteria that live in the filters need ammonia &
nitrites to feed on so you need some source of ammonia in your new tank - if
you put a mature filter into a sterile, clean tank it will actually die
back - so putting a few fish in at the same time is very much the way to go.
Check for ammonia & nitrites for the first week or so - you may never see
any if you do it right.



I'm happy you posted this. I've always had a tank around and have cycled
my tanks by using aged media. I read in other sources how it can take a
tank a month or so to cycle, but using the method you describe (with a
light fish load the first month) I've never measured an ammonia or
nitrite spike.

I would like to add that I would not slap in delicate fish or more than
two or so fish while the tank is settling in, even with this process. At
least until your fist scheduled water change.

Christopher 17-07-2003 09:43 PM

Quick Question
 
Once again it depends on the size of a tank, one small fish in a 100+ gallon
tank thats planted (even without lots of light, CO2, and fast growers) could
probably live indefinitely without a water change or any filtration. You
can probably do this same setup with med-light plants, not fast growers, and
no CO2, as long as you do the stocking a little slower.

"Sherry Michael Weller" wrote in message
...


Iain Miller wrote:

Bear in mind that the bacteria that live in the filters need ammonia &
nitrites to feed on so you need some source of ammonia in your new

tank - if
you put a mature filter into a sterile, clean tank it will actually die
back - so putting a few fish in at the same time is very much the way to

go.
Check for ammonia & nitrites for the first week or so - you may never

see
any if you do it right.



I'm happy you posted this. I've always had a tank around and have cycled
my tanks by using aged media. I read in other sources how it can take a
tank a month or so to cycle, but using the method you describe (with a
light fish load the first month) I've never measured an ammonia or
nitrite spike.

I would like to add that I would not slap in delicate fish or more than
two or so fish while the tank is settling in, even with this process. At
least until your fist scheduled water change.





All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:44 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
GardenBanter