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Old 25-09-2004, 01:47 PM
Scott
 
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Default blue green alage

Hi, is blue green algae considered to be a serious problem. what I mean is
if it gets into an aquarium does that mean that a blackout or blackouts must
be performed to remove it from they aquarium because of the speed that it
spreads at and the lack of a working treatment in the UK.

I have had blue green algae in my aquarium since I first set it up in
November last year. it started as a small patch on the gravel in the front
of my tank and very quickly spread over the plants and gravel forming into
sheets. I removed the sheets and gravel cleaned weekly but it did not stop
spreading and the algae was back in force every three days or so.

I have a standard juwel 180 aquarium with zero ammonia nitrite nitrate 1ppm
phosphate. I have also lowered the phosphate with rowaphos to 0ppm for two
months. they only effect that had on the blue green algae was to reduce its
growth rate to a quarter of what it was. that also stopped nearly all plant
growth in my tank. a blacking out the aquarium for four days while the
phosphate was at zero also did not work

I have tried using blackouts several times. I tried a three day and a four
day blackout. each time the algae was not visible after a few days. but
returned a week or so after finishing. I then tried a six day blackout this
also had the same result. recently I tried a four day blackout followed by a
three day blackout two days later, I also started using interpet blue green
algae treatment a couple of weeks before. that has also not worked and the
algae returned after nearly two weeks, a few days ago, low down in the
gravel at the front of my aquarium. I put it down to the fact that a small
amount of light might have been getting to the gravel there, and have
started another four day blackout but i may try a seven or eight day
blackout in the hope of finally getting rid of the problem once and for all.

I have been using tin foil to blackout my aquarium with a towel hanging down
the back to help keep out the light that goes through the hagen picture
background at the back. I have also been covering all of that with a
sleeping bag except on this occasion were I have used extra tin foil along
the bottom of the aquarium. that gets it pretty near dark in the aquarium.

any ideas would be greatly appreciated!





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Old 25-09-2004, 09:20 PM
Michi Henning
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Scott" wrote in message
...

I have had blue green algae in my aquarium since I first set it up in
November last year. it started as a small patch on the gravel in the front
of my tank and very quickly spread over the plants and gravel forming into
sheets. I removed the sheets and gravel cleaned weekly but it did not stop
spreading and the algae was back in force every three days or so.


Go to a veterinary and get some erythromycin. This reliably kills BGA.
You can find detailed instructions for the treatment regime at
http://www.myfishtank.net/articles/bga.php, (It might be a good
idea to print out that sheet and take it with you to the vet, so he can
see what you want to do.) I've used these instructions in the past
myself with great success.

One additional tip: if you use erythromycin, don't tip it into the
tank directly, but put it into a small bottle of water first and
shake it up vigorously. If you don't do this, quite a bit of the
antibiotic just ends up sitting in lumps on the substrate.

Cheers,

Michi.

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Old 28-09-2004, 12:07 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Michi Henning" wrote in message ...
"Scott" wrote in message
...

I have had blue green algae in my aquarium since I first set it up in
November last year. it started as a small patch on the gravel in the front
of my tank and very quickly spread over the plants and gravel forming into
sheets. I removed the sheets and gravel cleaned weekly but it did not stop
spreading and the algae was back in force every three days or so.


Go to a veterinary and get some erythromycin. This reliably kills BGA.
You can find detailed instructions for the treatment regime at
http://www.myfishtank.net/articles/bga.php, (It might be a good
idea to print out that sheet and take it with you to the vet, so he can
see what you want to do.) I've used these instructions in the past
myself with great success.

One additional tip: if you use erythromycin, don't tip it into the
tank directly, but put it into a small bottle of water first and
shake it up vigorously. If you don't do this, quite a bit of the
antibiotic just ends up sitting in lumps on the substrate.

Cheers,

Michi.


Why go to all that trouble and cost when you can blackout of the tank
for 3 days and cost you nothing and is 100% effective at killing it?

Not sure why people suggest drugs vs something that is FREE and
effective.

Do 50% water change, add 1/4 teaspoon of KNO3 per 20 gal.
Cover with trash bag towels etc so that no light gets in for 3 full
days.
Remove CO2, increase water movement.

Do 50% water change and add the KNO3 back and make sure you dose
enough KNO3 for the tank take care of the tank regularly from then on
with dosing and water changes.

You need to put this method in your web site and detail it out, not
antibiotics.
It's Free
It's faster
It addresses the long term problem, (poor plant growth)
It's simpler and not everyone has access to antibiotics.
It's 100% effective also.
It's been done many many times all over the world.

Regards,
Tom Barr
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Old 28-09-2004, 10:02 PM
Aquarijen
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Why go to all that trouble and cost when you can blackout of the tank
for 3 days and cost you nothing and is 100% effective at killing it?

Not sure why people suggest drugs vs something that is FREE and
effective.

Do 50% water change, add 1/4 teaspoon of KNO3 per 20 gal.
Cover with trash bag towels etc so that no light gets in for 3 full
days.
Remove CO2, increase water movement.

Do 50% water change and add the KNO3 back and make sure you dose
enough KNO3 for the tank take care of the tank regularly from then on
with dosing and water changes.

You need to put this method in your web site and detail it out, not
antibiotics.
It's Free
It's faster
It addresses the long term problem, (poor plant growth)
It's simpler and not everyone has access to antibiotics.
It's 100% effective also.
It's been done many many times all over the world.

Regards,
Tom Barr



The OP said that he did blackouts several times and the algae came back.
-Jen


  #5   Report Post  
Old 28-09-2004, 11:44 PM
Craig Brye
 
Posts: n/a
Default

.... but I don't think he did the water change before hand, and I'm sure he
didn't add the KNO3. I'm willing to bet that if he follows Tom's advice to
the T, he won't have this problem. Tom knows what he's talking about. I've
found that out, and my only regret is not listening to him earlier on
issues.

Just my opinion though... Either way, hope the algae disappears!

--
Craig Brye
University of Phoenix Online

"Aquarijen" wrote in message
...

Why go to all that trouble and cost when you can blackout of the tank
for 3 days and cost you nothing and is 100% effective at killing it?

Not sure why people suggest drugs vs something that is FREE and
effective.

Do 50% water change, add 1/4 teaspoon of KNO3 per 20 gal.
Cover with trash bag towels etc so that no light gets in for 3 full
days.
Remove CO2, increase water movement.

Do 50% water change and add the KNO3 back and make sure you dose
enough KNO3 for the tank take care of the tank regularly from then on
with dosing and water changes.

You need to put this method in your web site and detail it out, not
antibiotics.
It's Free
It's faster
It addresses the long term problem, (poor plant growth)
It's simpler and not everyone has access to antibiotics.
It's 100% effective also.
It's been done many many times all over the world.

Regards,
Tom Barr



The OP said that he did blackouts several times and the algae came back.
-Jen






  #6   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 04:04 AM
Bob Alston
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Well it will come back if the conditions don't change after the blackout. I
have found that adding more plants and doing frequent water changes helps
prevent/reduce its occurrance - after a blackout.

--
Bob Alston

bobalston9 AT aol DOT com
"Craig Brye" wrote in message
news
... but I don't think he did the water change before hand, and I'm sure he
didn't add the KNO3. I'm willing to bet that if he follows Tom's advice
to
the T, he won't have this problem. Tom knows what he's talking about.
I've
found that out, and my only regret is not listening to him earlier on
issues.

Just my opinion though... Either way, hope the algae disappears!

--
Craig Brye
University of Phoenix Online

"Aquarijen" wrote in message
...

Why go to all that trouble and cost when you can blackout of the tank
for 3 days and cost you nothing and is 100% effective at killing it?

Not sure why people suggest drugs vs something that is FREE and
effective.

Do 50% water change, add 1/4 teaspoon of KNO3 per 20 gal.
Cover with trash bag towels etc so that no light gets in for 3 full
days.
Remove CO2, increase water movement.

Do 50% water change and add the KNO3 back and make sure you dose
enough KNO3 for the tank take care of the tank regularly from then on
with dosing and water changes.

You need to put this method in your web site and detail it out, not
antibiotics.
It's Free
It's faster
It addresses the long term problem, (poor plant growth)
It's simpler and not everyone has access to antibiotics.
It's 100% effective also.
It's been done many many times all over the world.

Regards,
Tom Barr



The OP said that he did blackouts several times and the algae came back.
-Jen






---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.770 / Virus Database: 517 - Release Date: 9/27/2004


  #7   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 12:08 PM
Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default

doesn't it have to get into the tank on plants or from water that fish come
in?
"Bob Alston" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Well it will come back if the conditions don't change after the blackout.
I have found that adding more plants and doing frequent water changes
helps prevent/reduce its occurrance - after a blackout.

--
Bob Alston

bobalston9 AT aol DOT com
"Craig Brye" wrote in message
news
... but I don't think he did the water change before hand, and I'm sure
he
didn't add the KNO3. I'm willing to bet that if he follows Tom's advice
to
the T, he won't have this problem. Tom knows what he's talking about.
I've
found that out, and my only regret is not listening to him earlier on
issues.

Just my opinion though... Either way, hope the algae disappears!

--
Craig Brye
University of Phoenix Online

"Aquarijen" wrote in message
...

Why go to all that trouble and cost when you can blackout of the tank
for 3 days and cost you nothing and is 100% effective at killing it?

Not sure why people suggest drugs vs something that is FREE and
effective.

Do 50% water change, add 1/4 teaspoon of KNO3 per 20 gal.
Cover with trash bag towels etc so that no light gets in for 3 full
days.
Remove CO2, increase water movement.

Do 50% water change and add the KNO3 back and make sure you dose
enough KNO3 for the tank take care of the tank regularly from then on
with dosing and water changes.

You need to put this method in your web site and detail it out, not
antibiotics.
It's Free
It's faster
It addresses the long term problem, (poor plant growth)
It's simpler and not everyone has access to antibiotics.
It's 100% effective also.
It's been done many many times all over the world.

Regards,
Tom Barr


The OP said that he did blackouts several times and the algae came back.
-Jen






---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.770 / Virus Database: 517 - Release Date: 9/27/2004



  #8   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 12:25 PM
Sandy Birrell
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Scott wrote:
doesn't it have to get into the tank on plants or from water that
fish come in?


It is everywhere, it has even been found thousands of feet up in the
atmosphere. It is a bacteria, you can dry it out and years later add water
and it will grow. It doesn't need light to live and it can process the
nitrogen in the air to feed. The only way to realy kill it is to use an
anti-bacterial agent.

HTH.


--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019


  #9   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 12:51 PM
Happy'Cam'per
 
Posts: n/a
Default


********.
Sandy, everything you said was true except for the anti-bacterial agent. It
can be erradicted using good husbandry (water quality) and adding nutrients
back that are missing, most notably NO3 and PO4. Try it and see!
--
**So long, and thanks for all the fish!**

"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
. ..
Scott wrote:
doesn't it have to get into the tank on plants or from water that
fish come in?


It is everywhere, it has even been found thousands of feet up in the
atmosphere. It is a bacteria, you can dry it out and years later add water
and it will grow. It doesn't need light to live and it can process the
nitrogen in the air to feed. The only way to realy kill it is to use an
anti-bacterial agent.

HTH.


--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019




  #10   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 01:32 PM
Sandy Birrell
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Happy'Cam'per wrote:
********.
Sandy, everything you said was true except for the anti-bacterial
agent. It can be erradicted using good husbandry (water quality) and
adding nutrients back that are missing, most notably NO3 and PO4. Try
it and see!



I don't have it anymore. I used to have it in both tanks till I got two
Plecs., now it is no more

The below was taken from here.

http://saltaquarium.about.com/od/aboutphosphatepo4/

"Phosphate or PO4 is a prime food source of algae, particularly
cyanobacteria or slime forms."

I also found this which backs up your method.

http://www.xs4all.nl/~buddendo/aquar...dfield_eng.htm

This is worth a read.

http://www.thekrib.com/Plants/Algae/cyanobacteria.html

It seems we should try evrything and see what works for us

--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019




  #11   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 01:51 PM
Happy'Cam'per
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Absolutely right Sandy, and thanks for posting those links. I am a BGA
survivor
so I know what this stuff can do, it literally took over my tank and
covered EVERYTHING. Anyway, adding NO3 and PO4 in the correct relation
sorted the problem for me, but you're absolutely right, try everything until
something works, all our tanks are different so one of these methods should
work. Cheers for now.
--
**So long, and thanks for all the fish!**

"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
. ..
Happy'Cam'per wrote:
********.
Sandy, everything you said was true except for the anti-bacterial
agent. It can be erradicted using good husbandry (water quality) and
adding nutrients back that are missing, most notably NO3 and PO4. Try
it and see!



I don't have it anymore. I used to have it in both tanks till I got two
Plecs., now it is no more

The below was taken from here.

http://saltaquarium.about.com/od/aboutphosphatepo4/

"Phosphate or PO4 is a prime food source of algae, particularly
cyanobacteria or slime forms."

I also found this which backs up your method.

http://www.xs4all.nl/~buddendo/aquar...dfield_eng.htm

This is worth a read.

http://www.thekrib.com/Plants/Algae/cyanobacteria.html

It seems we should try evrything and see what works for us

--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019




  #12   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 03:38 PM
Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default

this is getting confusing, I have read and been told that blackouts kill the
bacteria because it needs light to live and that a two to four day blackout
should kill all the bacteria in an aquarium. are you saying that blackouts
cannot work?
"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
. ..
Scott wrote:
doesn't it have to get into the tank on plants or from water that
fish come in?


It is everywhere, it has even been found thousands of feet up in the
atmosphere. It is a bacteria, you can dry it out and years later add water
and it will grow. It doesn't need light to live and it can process the
nitrogen in the air to feed. The only way to realy kill it is to use an
anti-bacterial agent.

HTH.


--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019




  #13   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 04:00 PM
Sandy Birrell
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Scott wrote:
this is getting confusing, I have read and been told that blackouts
kill the bacteria because it needs light to live and that a two to
four day blackout should kill all the bacteria in an aquarium. are
you saying that blackouts cannot work?


The blackouts will kill the chlorophil in the bacteria, but not the bacteria
itself. Once this is done you then have to make sure all your water
parameters are right, and keep them that way, or it will just come back
again. To get rid of it completely you have to kill the bacteria.

Read the rest of this thread, you will find there are more ways to deal with
this than you will have time to try


--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019


  #14   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2004, 04:33 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Aquarijen" wrote in message ...
Why go to all that trouble and cost when you can blackout of the tank
for 3 days and cost you nothing and is 100% effective at killing it?

Not sure why people suggest drugs vs something that is FREE and
effective.

Do 50% water change, add 1/4 teaspoon of KNO3 per 20 gal.
Cover with trash bag towels etc so that no light gets in for 3 full
days.
Remove CO2, increase water movement.

Do 50% water change and add the KNO3 back and make sure you dose
enough KNO3 for the tank take care of the tank regularly from then on
with dosing and water changes.

You need to put this method in your web site and detail it out, not
antibiotics.
It's Free
It's faster
It addresses the long term problem, (poor plant growth)
It's simpler and not everyone has access to antibiotics.
It's 100% effective also.
It's been done many many times all over the world.

Regards,
Tom Barr



The OP said that he did blackouts several times and the algae came back.
-Jen


He did not add the KNO3 back and has run low on NO3.
It's that simple.

When the plants grow well, the algae does not, there is a reason for
the plants not growing well, generally with BGA, low is the primary
cause for blooms.

I've done this and have trace psores of BGA in my tank, we all do.
Every sample I've ever looked at under the scope has had Oscillitoria
which is the geneus we have in our tanks.

I can lead you to water but if you do not follow the advice, I cannot
help and I suggested a solution, whether someone choses to do it, it
completely out of my hands but the method does work if you follow it.



Regards,
Tom Barr
  #15   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2004, 01:36 AM
Craig Brye
 
Posts: n/a
Default

BINGO...

No light will temporarily eliminate it, but it will come back if you haven't
changed the reason you got it in the first place (water parameters).

--
Craig Brye
University of Phoenix Online

"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
. ..
Scott wrote:
this is getting confusing, I have read and been told that blackouts
kill the bacteria because it needs light to live and that a two to
four day blackout should kill all the bacteria in an aquarium. are
you saying that blackouts cannot work?


The blackouts will kill the chlorophil in the bacteria, but not the

bacteria
itself. Once this is done you then have to make sure all your water
parameters are right, and keep them that way, or it will just come back
again. To get rid of it completely you have to kill the bacteria.

Read the rest of this thread, you will find there are more ways to deal

with
this than you will have time to try


--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019






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