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Old 14-08-2005, 08:13 PM
Ann
 
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Janet Baraclough expounded:

(It does salinate soil in Australia, btw..cite already provided)


No, it doesn't. What salinates the soil in Australia is too
complicated to get into here, it has to do with underground salt
deposits, the loss of native cover and the inability of the soil to
deal with all the water. The salt is already there, in vast
underground stores. See
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3564857.stm for a bit of
what's going on.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
e-mail address is not checked
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Old 15-08-2005, 12:01 AM
Tom Jaszewski
 
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 23:38:19 +0100, Janet Baraclough
wrote:

For the dumber Americans here,



WTF does this have to do with Americans? BTW I am a citizen of the
United States NOT an American....American covers N and S
America....seems your knowledge base needs some updating!



Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets. To plant a pine, one need only own a shovel.
-- Aldo Leopold
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Old 15-08-2005, 12:17 AM
Warren
 
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Janet Baraclough wrote:
Where do you think that underground salt store comes from? See below.
I've capitalised it, for the benefit of those with poor reading and
comprehension skills.


It's just too bad that you're so ignorant that you don't even understand
what it's really saying. You have totally misinterpreted what it says. It's
actually quite amusing that you're using it to prove you're right, when if
someone actually reads the whole thing, and understands what it says,
they'll see that it doesn't prove your mistaken beliefs at all.

It's so sad that you dug so hard, and ignored so much just to find something
that you thought backed-up your odd-ball theory. It's even sadder that what
you found really doesn't back-up your odd-ball theory because you really
don't understand what you're reading.

And you have the nerve to suggest that *other* people have poor reading
comprehension skills?

Sad.

Go out and pour some more salt water on your azaleas. That may be the only
way you'll understand how wrong you really are. Although based on history,
you'll ignore all the dead ones, and claim that the one that survived is
proof that salt water doesn't harm them.

--
Warren H.

==========
Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
to go outside now.
Have an outdoor project? Get a Black & Decker power tool::
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Old 15-08-2005, 02:46 AM
paghat
 
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In article , Ann
wrote:

Janet Baraclough expounded:

Get that? It tells you there is scientific, peer reviewed, accepted
agricultural research in Australia into salt precipitated over western
Australia. For the dumber Americans here, precipitated means it fell in
rain. All you have to do, to learn more about how that rained salt
becomes part of the soil salination problem, is read the WA salination
website.


You know, I just realized how bad you've actually become. Now we
should discuss ignorant Brits? Descending to insults is the last
bastion of a true loser.


Janet's usually not this nutty. I suspect something has gone wrong in life
& she's venting in a trolly manner so as not to have to deal with life, or
is so sensitized from bad stuff in life that at this point she cannot
abide being so damned wrong about ANYthing no matter how wrong she gets.
Just guessing, but emotional breakdowns CAN be like mini-psychotic breaks.
They generally pass.

-paghat the ratgirl

The underground salt deposits are from ancient seas, Janet. The water
table has risen and brought the salts to the surface. But since that
doesn't fit your little theory that salt falls in rainwater you're
ignoring it.

--
Get your Paghat the Ratgirl T-Shirt he
http://www.paghat.com/giftshop.html
"In every country and in every age, the priest has been hostile to
liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot." -Thomas Jefferson
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Old 15-08-2005, 04:29 PM
paghat
 
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In article , Janet Baraclough
wrote:

The message
from Tom Jaszewski contains these words:

On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 23:38:19 +0100, Janet Baraclough
wrote:


For the dumber Americans here,



WTF does this have to do with Americans?


Ask Paghat; it was she who referred to America's " increasingly
imbecilic population".

Janet


You mean you're NOT a Scot???

-paggers
--
Get your Paghat the Ratgirl T-Shirt he
http://www.paghat.com/giftshop.html
"In every country and in every age, the priest has been hostile to
liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot." -Thomas Jefferson


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Old 18-08-2005, 05:06 AM
Warren
 
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Janet Baraclough wrote:
Do you imagine the West Australia Dept of Agriculture has not been to
Australia or studied its situation? I'm very surprised you find a talk
by a Boston-based photographic journalist, more scientifically
significant than their peer-reviewed research.


I think everyone is willing to say that the West Australia Dept of
Agriculture knows their business. What we're saying is you're not
understanding what you're reading. You're taking it so out of context that
you think it says just the opposite of what they're really saying.

In the very first paragraph it states:
"Increased recharge raises the water table, bringing naturally stored salts
from depth to the surface."

So their point is that the salt problem that rainfall causes is the rise in
the water table, not the salt content of the rain itself. While the source
of the salt is believed to be the rain water, the amount of salt in the rain
is essentially insignificant unless you have no flushing action, and you
wait 20,000 years.

They're not saying that it rains salt water. Their saying that because of
geological conditions salt in the soil isn't being flushed by the rain
water.

Ann's expert is saying the same thing your expert is saying, but you aren't
understanding what your expert is really saying, and you're hearing
essentially the opposite of what they actually are saying. You are
misunderstanding what you are reading.

--
Warren H.

==========
Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
to go outside now.
Have an outdoor project? Get a Black & Decker power tool::
http://www.holzemville.com/mall/blackanddecker/



  #67   Report Post  
Old 26-08-2005, 08:14 PM
Stephen Henning
 
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Janet Baraclough wrote:

In the discussion about salty precipitation (which Paghat claimed
does not exist), "what I dug up" was Australian Govt research by the
Western Australia Dept of Agriculture, proving it does.

I cited the Australian site, as proof that coastal precipitation A)
does contain salt and B) does deposit that salt on land. Note, I
described, above, heavily salt-laden rain and wind.

These are incontrovertible sources of information, Ann. Not my
opinion, not something I invented.


Tell us about how switching from drinking rain water to drinking sea
water is going since you have proved they are the same. By the way I
bear no responsibility for your demise or funeral costs, try billing
that to the Australian Government agency you are quoting.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to
Visit my Rhododendron and Azalea web pages at:
http://home.earthlink.net/~rhodyman/rhody.html
Also visit the Rhododendron and Azalea Bookstore at:
http://home.earthlink.net/~rhodyman/rhodybooks.html
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA Zone 6
  #68   Report Post  
Old 14-09-2020, 02:01 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2020
Posts: 1
Default Salt water damage to azaleas

I have a very similar situation yet not quite the same depth or duration of exposure. All my camellias handled the salt water intrusion find as did most of my azaleas. A few, however, lost most or all of their leaves. 2 of them are already starting to regrow leaves but several more show no regrowth. That said, the stems remain green upon cutting, seemingly indicative of a healthy plant. Would you expect them to deteriorate given no leaf regrowth ? It was been 4 weeks.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/garden...eas-41014-.htm



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