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Old 30-03-2003, 06:32 PM
Nick Thudick
 
Posts: n/a
Default NEWBIE HELP: How to seed?

Hello,

I've been an amateur gardener for a few years, and I am interested in
learning more.

One thing I've never understood is seeding. The directions are a little
confusing, but I'd like to have more success.

First, what is the "last heavy spring frost"?

Also, what is a "seed starting formula"? I've read about soil-less
mixtures. This boggles my mind. How the hell did these plants survive
if they need to be started in soil-less mixtures, and then fertilized
when their leaves emerge?

And instructions like, "Sow seeds 6" apart"....does that mean take one
seed and plant it 6" apart from the other one. I know that's probably
it, but some of these seeds are pretty tiny, and I was wondering if it
would be better to plant a few together.

Sorry if these sound like stupid questions, and thanks for any advice!

---Nick

  #2   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2003, 09:44 PM
Françoise
 
Posts: n/a
Default NEWBIE HELP: How to seed?

Nick,

The last frost is just that. If you go to GOOGLE or any other search engi=
ne,
ask for it for the region you are in. A gardener center close to your hom=
e
can tell you as well

"seed starting formula"? Go to a store or gardener center that sell soil.=

Look for a bag where it is written for seedling. Ask for it if you cannot=

find it. To plant indoor, I get those trays, which come with little cella=

and a plastic, transparent cover. To make it easier, I mix the soil with
water in a small bucket and than fill the individual cells. This way I do=

not need to water them. Then I read the instruction for each plant. I put=

between 4 to 9 seeds per cells, depending on the number of seeds I have.
Every day or every two days I spray the cells with water (1 squish or 2).=
To
plant outdoor, I put more seeds than I need (some may not germinate). If =
too
many spring out, remove the extra ones as directed. Always follow the
instructions for cover or not, the depth to plant or any other instructio=
ns
given.

I just started two years ago and I have had great success with my seedlin=
gs
and I love it. This winter, I planted more than 40 types of seeds. We hav=
e
increased our flowerbeds and prepared new ones last fall. They need to be=

filled this spring.

You can get other information on the WEB. There is so much to learn out
there.

Good luck.

Fran=E7oise.

Nick Thudick wrote:

Hello,

I've been an amateur gardener for a few years, and I am interested in
learning more.

One thing I've never understood is seeding. The directions are a littl=

e
confusing, but I'd like to have more success.

First, what is the "last heavy spring frost"?

Also, what is a "seed starting formula"? I've read about soil-less
mixtures. This boggles my mind. How the hell did these plants survive=


if they need to be started in soil-less mixtures, and then fertilized
when their leaves emerge?

And instructions like, "Sow seeds 6" apart"....does that mean take one
seed and plant it 6" apart from the other one. I know that's probably
it, but some of these seeds are pretty tiny, and I was wondering if it
would be better to plant a few together.

Sorry if these sound like stupid questions, and thanks for any advice!

---Nick


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Old 30-03-2003, 11:56 PM
Tom C
 
Posts: n/a
Default NEWBIE HELP: How to seed?

I go to the dollar store or use old milk jugs and plant my garden seed
early.I also keep them outside unlike some who germinate them indoors,just
cover them if it gets to cold freezing is a good time to cover them.Plant as
the directions on the package gives you to do. keep wet till they sprout and
moist after that for about 2weeks .There after water when dry.Last frost
plant in ground and enjoy .The thing about gardening that is fun is its not
a exact thing experiment with it if you come up with something that works
that's different share it that's what it is all about.I have been gardening
for about 30 years now and always learn something every day and that's the
truth.Have fun. Best regards Tom C.





"Françoise" wrote in message
...
Nick,

The last frost is just that. If you go to GOOGLE or any other search engine,
ask for it for the region you are in. A gardener center close to your home
can tell you as well

"seed starting formula"? Go to a store or gardener center that sell soil.
Look for a bag where it is written for seedling. Ask for it if you cannot
find it. To plant indoor, I get those trays, which come with little cella
and a plastic, transparent cover. To make it easier, I mix the soil with
water in a small bucket and than fill the individual cells. This way I do
not need to water them. Then I read the instruction for each plant. I put
between 4 to 9 seeds per cells, depending on the number of seeds I have.
Every day or every two days I spray the cells with water (1 squish or 2). To
plant outdoor, I put more seeds than I need (some may not germinate). If too
many spring out, remove the extra ones as directed. Always follow the
instructions for cover or not, the depth to plant or any other instructions
given.

I just started two years ago and I have had great success with my seedlings
and I love it. This winter, I planted more than 40 types of seeds. We have
increased our flowerbeds and prepared new ones last fall. They need to be
filled this spring.

You can get other information on the WEB. There is so much to learn out
there.

Good luck.

Françoise.

Nick Thudick wrote:

Hello,

I've been an amateur gardener for a few years, and I am interested in
learning more.

One thing I've never understood is seeding. The directions are a little
confusing, but I'd like to have more success.

First, what is the "last heavy spring frost"?

Also, what is a "seed starting formula"? I've read about soil-less
mixtures. This boggles my mind. How the hell did these plants survive
if they need to be started in soil-less mixtures, and then fertilized
when their leaves emerge?

And instructions like, "Sow seeds 6" apart"....does that mean take one
seed and plant it 6" apart from the other one. I know that's probably
it, but some of these seeds are pretty tiny, and I was wondering if it
would be better to plant a few together.

Sorry if these sound like stupid questions, and thanks for any advice!

---Nick




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Old 31-03-2003, 04:20 PM
Frogleg
 
Posts: n/a
Default NEWBIE HELP: How to seed?

On Sun, 30 Mar 2003 16:20:00 GMT, Nick Thudick
wrote:


One thing I've never understood is seeding. The directions are a little
confusing, but I'd like to have more success.

First, what is the "last heavy spring frost"?


Usually described as "last frost date." It's an average of the date of
last frost in a given area. It means, ON AVERAGE, there isn't freezing
weather after that date. Ususally. Sort of. It doesn't mean "plant
your tomatoes the following day." It's just a guideline that on, say,
April 15th, it's time to get out there and prepare the beds and look
for nighttime temperatures high enough to make plants happy within the
next few weeks. Or perhaps, if you put out tomatoes on a pleasantly
warm March 29th, there's a fair chance they're gonna get zapped.

Also, what is a "seed starting formula"? I've read about soil-less
mixtures. This boggles my mind. How the hell did these plants survive
if they need to be started in soil-less mixtures, and then fertilized
when their leaves emerge?


Seed-starting mixtures, frequently soil-less, give seeds relatively
ideal conditions to germinate and get started. They're meant to keep
seeds moist, but not soggy, not promote the growth of fungus or mold,
and be light enough for little new roots to take hold. They're for
'seed-starting', not 'whole life plant-growing.' The first hurdle in
growing plants from seeds is to get the seeds to sprout. One wants to
provide as much help as possible.

And instructions like, "Sow seeds 6" apart"....does that mean take one
seed and plant it 6" apart from the other one. I know that's probably
it, but some of these seeds are pretty tiny, and I was wondering if it
would be better to plant a few together.


I think these are suggestions, not commandments. If seedlings are
going to be transplanted to intermmediate or final homes, they can be
sown more closely than the recommendations. Carrot seeds are tiny, and
usually sown directly into the ground. You can place one seed every 3"
and hope all will grow, or deposit every 1/2" (or closer) and be
prepared to thin out for final spacing. There's a rhyme I can never
remember about planting corn -- "one for the something, one for the
crow, one for something else, and one to grow." That is, putting in 4
seeds with the expectation of one eventual plant. Squash and melon
seeds are often planted 2 or 3 per 'hill' with the idea that the less
promising seedlings will be sacrificed, but if only one grows, that
one's the most promising. :-)
  #5   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2003, 05:44 PM
Susan Ford
 
Posts: n/a
Default NEWBIE HELP: How to seed?

I would recomend getting the book "New Seed Starter's Handbook by Nancy
Bulbel. This book has all the information you need to learn how to grow from
seed, and then some. It's a terrific reference.

Susan

"Nick Thudick" wrote in message
...
Hello,

I've been an amateur gardener for a few years, and I am interested in
learning more.

One thing I've never understood is seeding. The directions are a little
confusing, but I'd like to have more success.

First, what is the "last heavy spring frost"?

Also, what is a "seed starting formula"? I've read about soil-less
mixtures. This boggles my mind. How the hell did these plants survive
if they need to be started in soil-less mixtures, and then fertilized
when their leaves emerge?

And instructions like, "Sow seeds 6" apart"....does that mean take one
seed and plant it 6" apart from the other one. I know that's probably
it, but some of these seeds are pretty tiny, and I was wondering if it
would be better to plant a few together.

Sorry if these sound like stupid questions, and thanks for any advice!

---Nick





  #6   Report Post  
Old 01-04-2003, 06:20 AM
Nick Thudick
 
Posts: n/a
Default NEWBIE HELP: How to seed?

Wow! Some great advice, everyone.

Thanks!
  #7   Report Post  
Old 01-04-2003, 09:44 PM
Alice Gamewell
 
Posts: n/a
Default NEWBIE HELP: How to seed?

Nick,
Contact your University Extension office. They can sell you(for about one
dollar) a seed planting guide, or answer any questions you may have. The
guide tells you what dates to plant in your area. Where do you live? I may
have info on how to contact the extension office in your area?

Nick Thudick wrote:

Hello,

I've been an amateur gardener for a few years, and I am interested in
learning more.

One thing I've never understood is seeding. The directions are a little
confusing, but I'd like to have more success.

First, what is the "last heavy spring frost"?

Also, what is a "seed starting formula"? I've read about soil-less
mixtures. This boggles my mind. How the hell did these plants survive
if they need to be started in soil-less mixtures, and then fertilized
when their leaves emerge?

And instructions like, "Sow seeds 6" apart"....does that mean take one
seed and plant it 6" apart from the other one. I know that's probably
it, but some of these seeds are pretty tiny, and I was wondering if it
would be better to plant a few together.

Sorry if these sound like stupid questions, and thanks for any advice!

---Nick




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