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Old 22-03-2019, 09:09 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default California Lilac looks like it is dying :(

On 22/03/19 08:25, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 22/03/19 00:40, David E. Ross wrote:


My guess is that this "fact", started when Ceanothus were introduced to
the UK, and they could not deal with our wet summer climate. It then
became known throughout the UK gardening world that they were
short-lived, and this even found its way back to the land they came from.


Anyway, the dozen or so years since the OP was made should be around the
lifetime of a Ceanothus if the "short-lived" statement is to be believed!

--

Jeff

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Old 22-03-2019, 03:22 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default California Lilac looks like it is dying :(

On 3/22/2019 1:25 AM, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 22/03/19 00:40, David E. Ross wrote:

The entire genus Ceanothus is known to be short-lived, 5-10 years.
Thus, yours might have merely died of old age.


I see this stated many times, but I wonder if it is how most general
gardening information is disseminated - simply by repeating it without
checking the facts.

http://sonomamg.ucanr.edu/Plant_of_the_Month/Ceanothus_796/
"Ceanothus is often said to be short lived, but that may be mostly in
garden that insist on drip irrigation, summer water and soil amendments.
California native plants are generally intolerant of all of these. In
their wild conditions Ceanothus plants have a natural life cycle of
10-15 years, with some even longer, though fire sometimes shortens that
span."

https://calscape.org/Ceanothus-thyrsiflorus-%28Blueblossom-Ceanothus%29
"In general, if you water mature Ceanothus in the summer, they will
usually be short-lived. Best to choose a Ceanothus native to your
location, and stop direct watering after 1-2 years."

https://agsci.oregonstate.edu/osu-nursery-greenhouse-and-christmas-trees/ceanothus-evaluation-landscapes-western-oregon
"Some ceanothus, for example ‘Centennial’, do seem to be short-lived,
but most of them seem to be quite long-lived shrubs, given the correct
environment"

http://www.elkgrovegreenergardens.org/greener-garden-plants/california-lilacs
"The myth of Ceanothus being short lived is primarily spread by
incompetent gardeners that insist on drip irrigation, summer water and
soil amendments. California native plants hate all three. Expect a 20-25
year life from your Ceanothus in most gardens. We have many Mountain
Lilacs in the ground here that still look good after thirty years."

That last one is particularly interesting, as it concerns personal
experience.

All the above were from just the first couple of pages of an internet
search on "Ceanothus" and "short-lived".

My guess is that this "fact", started when Ceanothus were introduced to
the UK, and they could not deal with our wet summer climate. It then
became known throughout the UK gardening world that they were
short-lived, and this even found its way back to the land they came from.


My source is Sunset's "Western Garden Book", copyright 2001. West of
the Rocky Mountains from Alaska to San Diego, this is often considered
the gardener's bible.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html
Gardening diary at http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary
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Old 20-05-2019, 05:44 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default California Lilac looks like it is dying :(

replying to Pipper, Dilly wrote:
Pipper, I also live just south of the Canada border in northwest Washington. I
have three Victoria California Lilacs that turned totally brown. Yes, we had
terrible weather in February too. However, these plants have done this before,
and then completely recovered! The last time was a couple years ago and I
almost dug them up they stayed brown so long. Same thing this year! Two of the
three are already starting to sprout out new green growth right out of the
brown brush. One is still all brown but I am not going to give up on it
either! Wish I could send you a picture! P.S., these plants are 30 years old
and are hedges that get pruned regularly, and they get watered every other day
from the lawn sprinklers starting this time of year through fall. They all get
hit by the northeaster dead-on, which was bad this year. Maybe it sends them
into some kind of dormancy, I don’t know.

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/garden...ing-66471-.htm




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