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Old 20-04-2003, 02:56 PM
Plantkiller
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

My indoor potted 'corn' plants are growing upward, and losing their
lower leaves (this is normal). However I've seen several corn
plants in the plant center which are more like bushy plants, i.e.
the leaves cover the entire plant, bottom to top.

Am I missing a method of growing corn plants?? Mine are like trees,
long stem, with a mass of top foliage, developing new leaves on
top as the stem hardends and leaves drop off the bottom.


I've tried making small 1/4 incisions into the trunk to encourage
new growth there, with a small degree of success.

Should I be wrapping the trunk with peat moss and keeping it
wet to encourage new growth?


Any ideas ???

Thanks...

  #2   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 06:20 PM
Cereoid-XXXX
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

Would prefer you call your Dracaena fragrans "Dragon Tree" rather than "Corn
Plant". They are not related to Zea mays nor do they resemble the grass nor
do they grow like it.

If you grow your plant in a humid greenhouse, you might be able to keep the
plant more leafy but eventually the plant will lose its lower leaves no
matter what you do. Leaves are only temporary structures. Once they have
fallen, they will never come back. The plant is a woody shrub to small tree
with woody stems up to 15 m or more tall under favorable conditions. The
leafy plants you saw at the gerden center were probably recently gotten from
the wholesaler. In time they too will lose their lower leaves as the plants
produce new growth.

Don't cut into the stem. That will only encourage infection.

Wrapping the stem with wet peat may encourage the formation of aerial roots
but not leaves.




Plantkiller wrote in message
...
My indoor potted 'corn' plants are growing upward, and losing their
lower leaves (this is normal). However I've seen several corn
plants in the plant center which are more like bushy plants, i.e.
the leaves cover the entire plant, bottom to top.

Am I missing a method of growing corn plants?? Mine are like trees,
long stem, with a mass of top foliage, developing new leaves on
top as the stem hardends and leaves drop off the bottom.


I've tried making small 1/4 incisions into the trunk to encourage
new growth there, with a small degree of success.

Should I be wrapping the trunk with peat moss and keeping it
wet to encourage new growth?


Any ideas ???

Thanks...



  #3   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:44 PM
Gloria Lenon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

Don't cut into the stem. That will only encourage infection

I cut mine as it was getting too tall to be under the roof eaves, cut them
way back and got rewarded with 5 new shoots off the main stem. No problem
with infection. Also did this with my dracena marginata with great results.
Then I plunked the cut pieces into the ground at various areas around the
yard - all are growing.

--
gloria - only the iguanas know for sure


  #4   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 10:08 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 16:56:05 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

Would prefer you call your Dracaena fragrans "Dragon Tree" rather than "Corn
Plant". They are not related to Zea mays nor do they resemble the grass nor
do they grow like it.

Appreciate the terminology lesson but I think it's a lot easier on
everyone if I just call the plant by it's common moniker

http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plan.../Dracaena.html

Dracaena Fragrans is a.k.a. Corn Plant. Betcha if I can asked for
help on the newsgroup and said... Dragon Tree..... everyone would
write back and say...Ohhh you mean a CORN PLANT !!

If you grow your plant in a humid greenhouse, you might be able to keep the
plant more leafy but eventually the plant will lose its lower leaves no
matter what you do. Leaves are only temporary structures. Once they have
fallen, they will never come back. The plant is a woody shrub to small tree
with woody stems up to 15 m or more tall under favorable conditions. The
leafy plants you saw at the gerden center were probably recently gotten from
the wholesaler. In time they too will lose their lower leaves as the plants
produce new growth.


Probably.... they were the only ones I'd ever seen like that. Just
made me think that I might be missing some information on caring for
the plant.

The part about the humid greenhouse is understandable,, I've noticed
a direct correlation between temperature / humidity change and loss
of leaves. Also the correlation between temperature change /
sunlight and growth of new leaf. Stable temperature / light /water
/ humidity would keep the plant more consistent.


Don't cut into the stem. That will only encourage infection.




Wrapping the stem with wet peat may encourage the formation of aerial roots
but not leaves.


Many thanks for the information. Saves me a ton of experimenting.

There is one other question, normally the plant is single stem, but
I've seen plants with a central stem and two or three branches.
Is this accomplished through grafting ??? How is it done ???

Thanks !!!




Plantkiller wrote in message
.. .
My indoor potted 'corn' plants are growing upward, and losing their
lower leaves (this is normal). However I've seen several corn
plants in the plant center which are more like bushy plants, i.e.
the leaves cover the entire plant, bottom to top.

Am I missing a method of growing corn plants?? Mine are like trees,
long stem, with a mass of top foliage, developing new leaves on
top as the stem hardends and leaves drop off the bottom.


I've tried making small 1/4 incisions into the trunk to encourage
new growth there, with a small degree of success.

Should I be wrapping the trunk with peat moss and keeping it
wet to encourage new growth?


Any ideas ???

Thanks...



  #5   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 10:20 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 18:13:07 GMT, "Gloria Lenon"
wrote:

Don't cut into the stem. That will only encourage infection


I cut mine as it was getting too tall to be under the roof eaves, cut them
way back and got rewarded with 5 new shoots off the main stem. No problem
with infection. Also did this with my dracena marginata with great results.
Then I plunked the cut pieces into the ground at various areas around the
yard - all are growing.



Had to cut one of mine back about two years ago. It was about 12'
high with a very large leaf mass. My only other option was to cut a
hole in the ceiling. Cut it back in 12 - 14 inch increments.
Each piece potted into a new plant. Very easy to grow !!


  #6   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 01:08 AM
Cereoid-XXXX
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

Calling Dracaena fragrans a "Corn Plant" is only a recent dumbing down of a
common name coined for the plant to accommodate the uneducated average
grower and sell plants. Unfortunately, the inappropriate name neither
enlightenes the grower nor does it give an accurate impression of how to
care for it properly. Most of the problems people have with it come from it
not at all growing like corn and people's unrealistic expectations based on
what they assume a "corn plant" should need. Just because others are stupid
fools that doesn't mean you should be that way also. Got it? Get it? Good.


wrote in message
...
On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 16:56:05 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

Would prefer you call your Dracaena fragrans "Dragon Tree" rather than

"Corn
Plant". They are not related to Zea mays nor do they resemble the grass

nor
do they grow like it.

Appreciate the terminology lesson but I think it's a lot easier on
everyone if I just call the plant by it's common moniker

http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plan.../Dracaena.html

Dracaena Fragrans is a.k.a. Corn Plant. Betcha if I can asked for
help on the newsgroup and said... Dragon Tree..... everyone would
write back and say...Ohhh you mean a CORN PLANT !!

If you grow your plant in a humid greenhouse, you might be able to keep

the
plant more leafy but eventually the plant will lose its lower leaves no
matter what you do. Leaves are only temporary structures. Once they have
fallen, they will never come back. The plant is a woody shrub to small

tree
with woody stems up to 15 m or more tall under favorable conditions. The
leafy plants you saw at the gerden center were probably recently gotten

from
the wholesaler. In time they too will lose their lower leaves as the

plants
produce new growth.


Probably.... they were the only ones I'd ever seen like that. Just
made me think that I might be missing some information on caring for
the plant.

The part about the humid greenhouse is understandable,, I've noticed
a direct correlation between temperature / humidity change and loss
of leaves. Also the correlation between temperature change /
sunlight and growth of new leaf. Stable temperature / light /water
/ humidity would keep the plant more consistent.


Don't cut into the stem. That will only encourage infection.




Wrapping the stem with wet peat may encourage the formation of aerial

roots
but not leaves.


Many thanks for the information. Saves me a ton of experimenting.

There is one other question, normally the plant is single stem, but
I've seen plants with a central stem and two or three branches.
Is this accomplished through grafting ??? How is it done ???

Thanks !!!




Plantkiller wrote in message
.. .
My indoor potted 'corn' plants are growing upward, and losing their
lower leaves (this is normal). However I've seen several corn
plants in the plant center which are more like bushy plants, i.e.
the leaves cover the entire plant, bottom to top.

Am I missing a method of growing corn plants?? Mine are like trees,
long stem, with a mass of top foliage, developing new leaves on
top as the stem hardends and leaves drop off the bottom.


I've tried making small 1/4 incisions into the trunk to encourage
new growth there, with a small degree of success.

Should I be wrapping the trunk with peat moss and keeping it
wet to encourage new growth?


Any ideas ???

Thanks...





  #7   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 02:56 AM
plantkiller.
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 23:49:53 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

Calling Dracaena fragrans a "Corn Plant" is only a recent dumbing down of a
common name coined for the plant to accommodate the uneducated average
grower and sell plants. Unfortunately, the inappropriate name neither
enlightenes the grower nor does it give an accurate impression of how to
care for it properly. Most of the problems people have with it come from it
not at all growing like corn and people's unrealistic expectations based on
what they assume a "corn plant" should need. Just because others are stupid
fools that doesn't mean you should be that way also. Got it? Get it? Good.



I tried being smart once....didn't work all that well, ....I don't
mind being called stupid... it's fun watching people try to prove
how intelligent they are !!!

If I'm dealing with uneducated grower and seller of plants.....I'm
working at their level.... think of it this way..... I want the
plant to grow, they know how to make the plants grow..... If they
can do all this without an advanced degree, that's good enough for
me.

btw, some of the brightest bulbs on the tree are actually dumb as
jack..... some of the less gifted bulbs on the tree have been some
of the ones I've learned the most from....

So in the future if I say Corn Plant, just say to yourself, the
stupid jerk means Dracaena fragrans. You'll be a hero by
answering the question, I won't have to deal with lengthy
explanations that people don't really care about...and the plant will
be happy also. A win-win if ever one there was.

Interesting point, I've heard this plant called a 'corn plant"
probably about 25 years ago by a horticulturist. Person struck me
as being pretty knowledgeable. (an understatement).

So are the multiple stems grafted or not....and how do they do it ???


Thanks in advance.



  #8   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 03:44 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

How dare you call anyone stupid? You are beneath comtempt, you
officious little pile of dung.

What are you anyway? My guess: A failed graduate student from some
third rate botany department? Doesn't it get old having everyone you
meet fell either pity or contempt for you?

It must be truly sad to be you and having one single thing that you
have that you delight in showing off to make yourself feel better than
others. Can anyone's life really be that empty, that barren, that
worthless?

It's not too late, you can probably still get help. I urge you to seek
professional care. Or, failing that, can you just crawl back under the
rock you came from? Some things are too ugly for daylight.



On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 23:49:53 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

|Calling Dracaena fragrans a "Corn Plant" is only a recent dumbing down of a
|common name coined for the plant to accommodate the uneducated average
|grower and sell plants. Unfortunately, the inappropriate name neither
|enlightenes the grower nor does it give an accurate impression of how to
|care for it properly. Most of the problems people have with it come from it
|not at all growing like corn and people's unrealistic expectations based on
|what they assume a "corn plant" should need. Just because others are stupid
|fools that doesn't mean you should be that way also. Got it? Get it? Good.
|
|
wrote in message
.. .
| On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 16:56:05 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
| wrote:
|
| Would prefer you call your Dracaena fragrans "Dragon Tree" rather than
|"Corn
| Plant". They are not related to Zea mays nor do they resemble the grass
|nor
| do they grow like it.
|
| Appreciate the terminology lesson but I think it's a lot easier on
| everyone if I just call the plant by it's common moniker
|
| http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plan.../Dracaena.html
|
| Dracaena Fragrans is a.k.a. Corn Plant. Betcha if I can asked for
| help on the newsgroup and said... Dragon Tree..... everyone would
| write back and say...Ohhh you mean a CORN PLANT !!
|
| If you grow your plant in a humid greenhouse, you might be able to keep
|the
| plant more leafy but eventually the plant will lose its lower leaves no
| matter what you do. Leaves are only temporary structures. Once they have
| fallen, they will never come back. The plant is a woody shrub to small
|tree
| with woody stems up to 15 m or more tall under favorable conditions. The
| leafy plants you saw at the gerden center were probably recently gotten
|from
| the wholesaler. In time they too will lose their lower leaves as the
|plants
| produce new growth.
|
| Probably.... they were the only ones I'd ever seen like that. Just
| made me think that I might be missing some information on caring for
| the plant.
|
| The part about the humid greenhouse is understandable,, I've noticed
| a direct correlation between temperature / humidity change and loss
| of leaves. Also the correlation between temperature change /
| sunlight and growth of new leaf. Stable temperature / light /water
| / humidity would keep the plant more consistent.
|
|
| Don't cut into the stem. That will only encourage infection.
|
|
|
| Wrapping the stem with wet peat may encourage the formation of aerial
|roots
| but not leaves.
|
|
| Many thanks for the information. Saves me a ton of experimenting.
|
| There is one other question, normally the plant is single stem, but
| I've seen plants with a central stem and two or three branches.
| Is this accomplished through grafting ??? How is it done ???
|
| Thanks !!!
|
|
|
|
| Plantkiller wrote in message
| .. .
| My indoor potted 'corn' plants are growing upward, and losing their
| lower leaves (this is normal). However I've seen several corn
| plants in the plant center which are more like bushy plants, i.e.
| the leaves cover the entire plant, bottom to top.
|
| Am I missing a method of growing corn plants?? Mine are like trees,
| long stem, with a mass of top foliage, developing new leaves on
| top as the stem hardends and leaves drop off the bottom.
|
|
| I've tried making small 1/4 incisions into the trunk to encourage
| new growth there, with a small degree of success.
|
| Should I be wrapping the trunk with peat moss and keeping it
| wet to encourage new growth?
|
|
| Any ideas ???
|
| Thanks...
|
|
|

  #9   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 01:44 PM
Cereoid-XXXX
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

I wasn't referring to you, killer, but rather that wiseacre who revels in
his stupidity. He may be proud to be a jack-off but that is his problem.
Don't make it yours.

You didn't know the correct name of the plant until now and there was
nothing in the info available to you to suggest anything better. I am not
blaming you but rather the plant industry that assumes most growers are
stupid and the horticultural hustlers that are only interested in making a
fast buck. To most in the trade, any name is as good as any other. That's
why the make up silly names for the plants. Its not because of their
supposed knowledge, its because of their ignorance. Their speaking in jargon
doesn't always mean they know what the freak they are talking about.


Your plant will branch when it is ready to. You can decapitate the plant to
make it branch but you will have to deal with a naked stem in the mean time.


BTW, bulbs don't grow on trees.


plantkiller. wrote in message
...
On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 23:49:53 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

Calling Dracaena fragrans a "Corn Plant" is only a recent dumbing down of

a
common name coined for the plant to accommodate the uneducated average
grower and sell plants. Unfortunately, the inappropriate name neither
enlightenes the grower nor does it give an accurate impression of how to
care for it properly. Most of the problems people have with it come from

it
not at all growing like corn and people's unrealistic expectations based

on
what they assume a "corn plant" should need. Just because others are

stupid
fools that doesn't mean you should be that way also. Got it? Get it?

Good.



I tried being smart once....didn't work all that well, ....I don't
mind being called stupid... it's fun watching people try to prove
how intelligent they are !!!

If I'm dealing with uneducated grower and seller of plants.....I'm
working at their level.... think of it this way..... I want the
plant to grow, they know how to make the plants grow..... If they
can do all this without an advanced degree, that's good enough for
me.

btw, some of the brightest bulbs on the tree are actually dumb as
jack..... some of the less gifted bulbs on the tree have been some
of the ones I've learned the most from....

So in the future if I say Corn Plant, just say to yourself, the
stupid jerk means Dracaena fragrans. You'll be a hero by
answering the question, I won't have to deal with lengthy
explanations that people don't really care about...and the plant will
be happy also. A win-win if ever one there was.

Interesting point, I've heard this plant called a 'corn plant"
probably about 25 years ago by a horticulturist. Person struck me
as being pretty knowledgeable. (an understatement).

So are the multiple stems grafted or not....and how do they do it ???


Thanks in advance.





  #10   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 01:44 PM
Cereoid-XXXX
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

ROTFLMAO!

Am I being told off by another insecure self-righteous masturbating
gardener?
What's the matter, am I hitting too close to home, Gomer?
You obviously know nothing about plants and my point is completely lost on a
simpleton like you.
You are the problem not the solution, dweeb.


wrote in message
...
How dare you call anyone stupid? You are beneath comtempt, you
officious little pile of dung.

What are you anyway? My guess: A failed graduate student from some
third rate botany department? Doesn't it get old having everyone you
meet fell either pity or contempt for you?

It must be truly sad to be you and having one single thing that you
have that you delight in showing off to make yourself feel better than
others. Can anyone's life really be that empty, that barren, that
worthless?

It's not too late, you can probably still get help. I urge you to seek
professional care. Or, failing that, can you just crawl back under the
rock you came from? Some things are too ugly for daylight.



On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 23:49:53 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

|Calling Dracaena fragrans a "Corn Plant" is only a recent dumbing down of

a
|common name coined for the plant to accommodate the uneducated average
|grower and sell plants. Unfortunately, the inappropriate name neither
|enlightenes the grower nor does it give an accurate impression of how to
|care for it properly. Most of the problems people have with it come from

it
|not at all growing like corn and people's unrealistic expectations based

on
|what they assume a "corn plant" should need. Just because others are

stupid
|fools that doesn't mean you should be that way also. Got it? Get it?

Good.
|
|
wrote in message
.. .
| On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 16:56:05 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
| wrote:
|
| Would prefer you call your Dracaena fragrans "Dragon Tree" rather than
|"Corn
| Plant". They are not related to Zea mays nor do they resemble the

grass
|nor
| do they grow like it.
|
| Appreciate the terminology lesson but I think it's a lot easier on
| everyone if I just call the plant by it's common moniker
|
| http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plan.../Dracaena.html
|
| Dracaena Fragrans is a.k.a. Corn Plant. Betcha if I can asked for
| help on the newsgroup and said... Dragon Tree..... everyone would
| write back and say...Ohhh you mean a CORN PLANT !!
|
| If you grow your plant in a humid greenhouse, you might be able to

keep
|the
| plant more leafy but eventually the plant will lose its lower leaves

no
| matter what you do. Leaves are only temporary structures. Once they

have
| fallen, they will never come back. The plant is a woody shrub to small
|tree
| with woody stems up to 15 m or more tall under favorable conditions.

The
| leafy plants you saw at the gerden center were probably recently

gotten
|from
| the wholesaler. In time they too will lose their lower leaves as the
|plants
| produce new growth.
|
| Probably.... they were the only ones I'd ever seen like that. Just
| made me think that I might be missing some information on caring for
| the plant.
|
| The part about the humid greenhouse is understandable,, I've noticed
| a direct correlation between temperature / humidity change and loss
| of leaves. Also the correlation between temperature change /
| sunlight and growth of new leaf. Stable temperature / light /water
| / humidity would keep the plant more consistent.
|
|
| Don't cut into the stem. That will only encourage infection.
|
|
|
| Wrapping the stem with wet peat may encourage the formation of aerial
|roots
| but not leaves.
|
|
| Many thanks for the information. Saves me a ton of experimenting.
|
| There is one other question, normally the plant is single stem, but
| I've seen plants with a central stem and two or three branches.
| Is this accomplished through grafting ??? How is it done ???
|
| Thanks !!!
|
|
|
|
| Plantkiller wrote in message
| .. .
| My indoor potted 'corn' plants are growing upward, and losing

their
| lower leaves (this is normal). However I've seen several corn
| plants in the plant center which are more like bushy plants, i.e.
| the leaves cover the entire plant, bottom to top.
|
| Am I missing a method of growing corn plants?? Mine are like trees,
| long stem, with a mass of top foliage, developing new leaves on
| top as the stem hardends and leaves drop off the bottom.
|
|
| I've tried making small 1/4 incisions into the trunk to

encourage
| new growth there, with a small degree of success.
|
| Should I be wrapping the trunk with peat moss and keeping it
| wet to encourage new growth?
|
|
| Any ideas ???
|
| Thanks...
|
|
|





  #11   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 04:44 PM
plantkiller
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

On Mon, 21 Apr 2003 12:26:31 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

I wasn't referring to you, killer, but rather that wiseacre who revels in
his stupidity. He may be proud to be a jack-off but that is his problem.
Don't make it yours.


Uhhh..... and plantkiller are both the same person...
me. Just using different computers on my home network. (wi fi
makes it easy to use multiple systems.

Which explains why even medically licensed clinical psychologists
do not attempt to read a posters personality traits from postings in
a internet newsgroup forum. You obviously are very advanced in
analyzing human behaviourial characteristics and personality types.



You didn't know the correct name of the plant until now and there was
nothing in the info available to you to suggest anything better.


Do a quick google search...and visit the websites. Seems to me a lot
of the Agricultural Cooperative Extension departments at some major
universities also call the dracaena fragrans 'corn plants". If it's
good enough for the scientific and academic community, it's good
enough for me.

And you are the Department Chair at which University????
Agricultural Extension Agent ??? By claiming that other academics
are incorrect, I usually like to verify the credentials of the person
speaking with to make sure they are 'considered knowledgeable"


I am not
blaming you but rather the plant industry that assumes most growers are
stupid and the horticultural hustlers that are only interested in making a
fast buck. To most in the trade, any name is as good as any other. That's
why the make up silly names for the plants. Its not because of their
supposed knowledge, its because of their ignorance. Their speaking in jargon
doesn't always mean they know what the freak they are talking about.


Hmmm...I can think of about 15 different reasons for naming a
plant..... marketing, consumerism, tradenames, patents,
product differentiation.... common name...... none of which seem to
be particularly due to stupidity.

As mentioned... a very respected horticulturist referred to the
dracaena fragrans as a 'corn plant' over 25 years ago. And it's
very widely accepted common name for dracaena fragrans in
todays' literature.

This suggests that your 'theory' about recently 'dumbing down' is
based more on mis-information or wishful thinking rather than
knowledge. Unless you consider 25 years to be 'recent'.


Your plant will branch when it is ready to. You can decapitate the plant to
make it branch but you will have to deal with a naked stem in the mean time.


After 10 years of growing corn plants, none has branched out on it's
own. They have grown tall, bushy, flowered and produced seeds
but none have developed multiplre branches from a single stem on it's
own.

Makes me think that they need to be encouraged to do so... And I'd
like to know how. Probably a pretty simple procedure....

BTW, bulbs don't grow on trees.

Yes, bad choice of descriptive phrases.. should have used....

"sharpest tool in the shed"


Hope I don't have to explain the meaning in context used.... that
would really prove a point.


It's been nice but this is a garden forum...and I really don't have
the time nor inclination to be pulled into a 'semantics' or
linguistics "Tomato" Tomahto" "Potato" "Potatoe" time sink.


I mentioned corn plant....everyone knew (even you) what I was
referring to. That's good e'nuff for me.

On a scale of 1 to 5, I would consider your responses as
about a 2. They didn't provide any new information, no
breakthroughs.... and contained quite a lot of 'wishful thinking',
pseudo-intellectualism mis-infomation'. Not a good gardening
resource.

plantkiller. wrote in message
.. .
On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 23:49:53 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

Calling Dracaena fragrans a "Corn Plant" is only a recent dumbing down of

a
common name coined for the plant to accommodate the uneducated average
grower and sell plants. Unfortunately, the inappropriate name neither
enlightenes the grower nor does it give an accurate impression of how to
care for it properly. Most of the problems people have with it come from

it
not at all growing like corn and people's unrealistic expectations based

on
what they assume a "corn plant" should need. Just because others are

stupid
fools that doesn't mean you should be that way also. Got it? Get it?

Good.



I tried being smart once....didn't work all that well, ....I don't
mind being called stupid... it's fun watching people try to prove
how intelligent they are !!!

If I'm dealing with uneducated grower and seller of plants.....I'm
working at their level.... think of it this way..... I want the
plant to grow, they know how to make the plants grow..... If they
can do all this without an advanced degree, that's good enough for
me.

btw, some of the brightest bulbs on the tree are actually dumb as
jack..... some of the less gifted bulbs on the tree have been some
of the ones I've learned the most from....

So in the future if I say Corn Plant, just say to yourself, the
stupid jerk means Dracaena fragrans. You'll be a hero by
answering the question, I won't have to deal with lengthy
explanations that people don't really care about...and the plant will
be happy also. A win-win if ever one there was.

Interesting point, I've heard this plant called a 'corn plant"
probably about 25 years ago by a horticulturist. Person struck me
as being pretty knowledgeable. (an understatement).

So are the multiple stems grafted or not....and how do they do it ???


Thanks in advance.





  #12   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 06:08 PM
plantkiller
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

With nothing better to do.... I looked up Cereoid's
many past dysfunctional rants and raves....

(Polish from Baltimore... that explains everything !!!. Their idea of
a garden is a window box in front of a row house.

hmmm... time for the kill file.. Lift, drop, close cover,
flush...... another pest down the drain..... (Ahh I feel better
already).



On a scale of 1 to 5, I would consider your responses as
about a 2. They didn't provide any new information, no
breakthroughs.... and contained quite a lot of 'wishful thinking',
pseudo-intellectualism mis-infomation'. Not a good gardening
resource.


  #13   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 08:20 PM
Cereoid-XXXX
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

Is that so? In that case, you are nothing but an arrogant jackass troll
wasting everyone's time.

Since Dracaena fragarans has been in cultivation since the 1600's, the past
25 years is recent. In fact, it roughly corresponds to the current
generation of lazy slackers, of which I would suspect you are one.

plantkiller wrote in message
...
On Mon, 21 Apr 2003 12:26:31 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

I wasn't referring to you, killer, but rather that wiseacre who revels in
his stupidity. He may be proud to be a jack-off but that is his problem.
Don't make it yours.


Uhhh..... and plantkiller are both the same person...
me. Just using different computers on my home network. (wi fi
makes it easy to use multiple systems.

Which explains why even medically licensed clinical psychologists
do not attempt to read a posters personality traits from postings in
a internet newsgroup forum. You obviously are very advanced in
analyzing human behaviourial characteristics and personality types.



You didn't know the correct name of the plant until now and there was
nothing in the info available to you to suggest anything better.


Do a quick google search...and visit the websites. Seems to me a lot
of the Agricultural Cooperative Extension departments at some major
universities also call the dracaena fragrans 'corn plants". If it's
good enough for the scientific and academic community, it's good
enough for me.

And you are the Department Chair at which University????
Agricultural Extension Agent ??? By claiming that other academics
are incorrect, I usually like to verify the credentials of the person
speaking with to make sure they are 'considered knowledgeable"


I am not
blaming you but rather the plant industry that assumes most growers are
stupid and the horticultural hustlers that are only interested in making

a
fast buck. To most in the trade, any name is as good as any other. That's
why the make up silly names for the plants. Its not because of their
supposed knowledge, its because of their ignorance. Their speaking in

jargon
doesn't always mean they know what the freak they are talking about.


Hmmm...I can think of about 15 different reasons for naming a
plant..... marketing, consumerism, tradenames, patents,
product differentiation.... common name...... none of which seem to
be particularly due to stupidity.

As mentioned... a very respected horticulturist referred to the
dracaena fragrans as a 'corn plant' over 25 years ago. And it's
very widely accepted common name for dracaena fragrans in
todays' literature.

This suggests that your 'theory' about recently 'dumbing down' is
based more on mis-information or wishful thinking rather than
knowledge. Unless you consider 25 years to be 'recent'.


Your plant will branch when it is ready to. You can decapitate the plant

to
make it branch but you will have to deal with a naked stem in the mean

time.


After 10 years of growing corn plants, none has branched out on it's
own. They have grown tall, bushy, flowered and produced seeds
but none have developed multiplre branches from a single stem on it's
own.

Makes me think that they need to be encouraged to do so... And I'd
like to know how. Probably a pretty simple procedure....

BTW, bulbs don't grow on trees.

Yes, bad choice of descriptive phrases.. should have used....

"sharpest tool in the shed"


Hope I don't have to explain the meaning in context used.... that
would really prove a point.


It's been nice but this is a garden forum...and I really don't have
the time nor inclination to be pulled into a 'semantics' or
linguistics "Tomato" Tomahto" "Potato" "Potatoe" time sink.


I mentioned corn plant....everyone knew (even you) what I was
referring to. That's good e'nuff for me.

On a scale of 1 to 5, I would consider your responses as
about a 2. They didn't provide any new information, no
breakthroughs.... and contained quite a lot of 'wishful thinking',
pseudo-intellectualism mis-infomation'. Not a good gardening
resource.

plantkiller. wrote in message
.. .
On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 23:49:53 GMT, "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

Calling Dracaena fragrans a "Corn Plant" is only a recent dumbing down

of
a
common name coined for the plant to accommodate the uneducated average
grower and sell plants. Unfortunately, the inappropriate name neither
enlightenes the grower nor does it give an accurate impression of how

to
care for it properly. Most of the problems people have with it come

from
it
not at all growing like corn and people's unrealistic expectations

based
on
what they assume a "corn plant" should need. Just because others are

stupid
fools that doesn't mean you should be that way also. Got it? Get it?

Good.



I tried being smart once....didn't work all that well, ....I don't
mind being called stupid... it's fun watching people try to prove
how intelligent they are !!!

If I'm dealing with uneducated grower and seller of plants.....I'm
working at their level.... think of it this way..... I want the
plant to grow, they know how to make the plants grow..... If they
can do all this without an advanced degree, that's good enough for
me.

btw, some of the brightest bulbs on the tree are actually dumb as
jack..... some of the less gifted bulbs on the tree have been some
of the ones I've learned the most from....

So in the future if I say Corn Plant, just say to yourself, the
stupid jerk means Dracaena fragrans. You'll be a hero by
answering the question, I won't have to deal with lengthy
explanations that people don't really care about...and the plant will
be happy also. A win-win if ever one there was.

Interesting point, I've heard this plant called a 'corn plant"
probably about 25 years ago by a horticulturist. Person struck me
as being pretty knowledgeable. (an understatement).

So are the multiple stems grafted or not....and how do they do it ???


Thanks in advance.







  #14   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2003, 08:44 PM
Cereoid-XXXX
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

It sure is comforting to know that bigotry and stupidity are still thriving
among neo-nazi slackers like you, Deadweed. What's the matter? Did you get
laughed out of the video geek newsgroups for your ineptness and now you want
to terrorize a gardening group.

A half-wit troll neophyte cracker like you is not worthy of any detailed
insightful info, Dude.

Being rated by a know-nothing like you is a laugh riot.

Your mother sure likes doing that Polish keilbasa, at least she did the
other night!


plantkiller wrote in message
...
With nothing better to do.... I looked up Cereoid's
many past dysfunctional rants and raves....

(Polish from Baltimore... that explains everything !!!. Their idea of
a garden is a window box in front of a row house.

hmmm... time for the kill file.. Lift, drop, close cover,
flush...... another pest down the drain..... (Ahh I feel better
already).



On a scale of 1 to 5, I would consider your responses as
about a 2. They didn't provide any new information, no
breakthroughs.... and contained quite a lot of 'wishful thinking',
pseudo-intellectualism mis-infomation'. Not a good gardening
resource.





  #15   Report Post  
Old 22-04-2003, 01:32 AM
paghat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dracaena. (Corn Plant) leafing

In article , "Cereoid-XXXX"
wrote:

It sure is comforting to know that bigotry and stupidity are still thriving
among neo-nazi slackers like you, Deadweed.


"Incorrigible antisemitism casts a shadow over the historical reputation
of Poland," noted Ronald E. Modras.

It's was not cool that you were again being flamed for being Polish, but
it's MUCH worse to assume only nazis would notice a Polish heritage,
especially given how, historically speaking, Poles got along rather too
well with actual nazis. This is one of my personal bugbears -- calling
people nazis who by no stretch of the imagination even slightly resemble
nazis. It disrespects too many people who were seriously injured by the
nazis. And when it is bandied about against someone who didn't even get so
far as telling a pollack joke, well, it's jumping the gun rather too
seriously, & all it reminds me of is that Poles have been, & remain,
unreptentent antisemites.

Germans did (I still do) consider Poles & all slavic peoples to be
inferior, but so does most of the rest of the western world think that
way. Nevertheless Poles decided on which side of their bread would be
buttered, & nazis soon found cause to praise the "self-cleansing action"
of Polish society who with zero encouragement from Nazis set upon Jews &
killed them with great abandon, cutting their throats, setting them on
fire, & stomping Jewish babies in the heads -- it's all too well
documented by Jan Gross (& scores of others).

Indeed, so vicious were the Poles against the Jews even before the world
found out what Nazis were doing, that the Nazis were able to use Polish
attitudes against Jews as their "good excuse" for sealing Jews in ghettos
-- for their own protection against the orgy of death perpetrated by Poles
against Jews. At the beginning of the occupation, Jews actually did feel
protected by the nazis. There are levels of antisemitism -- hard to
imagine a more antisemitic people than the Russians -- but when the nazis
were pushed out of Poland, the few Jewish survivors welcomed the soviets,
because Poles were STILL killing Jews.

Poles have earned their inferiority complex. They hated Jews because the
intellectual life of Poland belonged to the Jews. Who in Poland was a
better writer than Bruno Shultz or I. L. Peretz? No one. The dominant
Catholic culture was of a peculiar coloration in Polish hands, & did not
seriously permit intellectual discourse. So an artist, mathemetician, or
philosopher who was not a Jew usually ended up hanging out with Jews! And
when the Germans arrived & rounded up the intelligentsia -- these being
"coincidentally" mainly Jews -- Poles were glad to help.

Such history is why that wonderful book MOUS depicts Poles as having the
faces of pigs. It's also why to this day any word meaning "Poles" is to
this day synonymous throughout Europe with "ignorant antisemites." And
when Poles whine about being picked on by polish jokes or for any other
reason, Poles remain no less unrepentent about their continuing
antisemitism.Jan Gross has well-documented the purely POLISH attrocities
against Jews, & laid out calmly the facts of the "the magnitude and
tenacity" of Polish antisemitism that is unabating to this day. Even
today, Poland is held far back from being a pluralistic democracy because
the culture & the people are very deeply antisemitic. They are never even
conflicted about when Jewish tourist dollars make it profitable to show
off the still-ruined synogogues & the gloomy sites of mass-slaughters of
Jews.

The source of this culture of antisemitism has for centuries been a form
of Catholicism that is bellicose, vicious, intolerant, & inhumane in its
teachings about the wickedness of Jews. There were moments in history when
Jews were respected in Poland, but these were times when the Catholic
church was least in control. There was an anti-Reformation movement in
Poland that had as its cornerstone the persecution of Jews. This long
history of hate is why Poles got along so well with nazis where the
disposition of Jews was concerned, & why it was the best place to
transport Jews from all over Europe to be killed. Obviously the nazis
hated Polish Catholic culture, but they did have this one big area very
much in common.

The government has some good laws against antisemitism but they are not
enforced. That the laws exist puts them ahead of Austria, the foremost
antisemitic nation in today's Europe. There is still tourist value from
Israelis & American Jews who want to visit places where our recent
ancestors were killed, so they pass stupid laws such as the "restoration
of synongogs" laws which permit the non-existent local Jews to restore
synogogues if they want to. Then the government praises itself for laws
that are meaningless. Synogogues are not being restored under these
meaingless laws. Hate group activity of sundry kinds is also
theoretically illegal, but by goverment policy even the most agregious mad
bomber isn't prosecuted. Kazimierz Switon was arrested for handing out
antisemitic literature at Auschwitz & insulting the profitable Israeli &
American tourists for behind ****ing Jews. He was found guilty of ahate
crime & sentenced to six months in prison, but was released in four weeks,
& a few months later his guilty verdict was reversed & he was acquitted of
further pending charges. Emboldened by how easily the law treated him, he
set bombs around Auschwitz, & the Warsaw prosecutor refused to prosecute
for it. The day all pending charges were dropped, a laughing Swinton left
the court to face cameras, & promised to carry on his war against the Jews
more aggressively than ever. A few months later a Warsaw prosecutor
refused even to investigate Switon's continuous illegal activities.

Polish revisionists like to claim it was Poles, more than Jews, the nazis
found inferior, & they pretend as many non-Jews were killed in the Pawiak
prison as in the Warsaw ghetto & in Auschwitz & Treblinka. Since the
1990s, "holocaust denial" has increased in popularity in Poland -- it was
Poles, not Jews, who suffered, & the literature upholding this delusion
grows almost hourly. Dr. Dariusz Ratajczyk of the University of Opoles
published a successful book "proving" the holocaust did not happen, & even
the liberal press turned out in support of his right to promote hate.
Ratajczyk was dragged into court, & boldly brought with him (as supporters
& companions) some of the most outrageous nazi sympathizers & antisemitic
activists Poland possesses. Reminiscent of Austria's Haider showing up at
public events with decrepit old nazis proudly wearing their nazi medals.
Several other "academics" have published holocaust denial books. It's
becoming veritably a Polish genre. That's what Poland's so-proud laws
against antisemitic hate crimes amounts to -- encouragement! (The
government is a little harder on Polish nazi skinhead youths -- but that's
because they're disobedient youth, not because of their antisemitism.)

The reality of course is tghat Yiddish culture was eradicated & does not
exist today. Polish culture does exist today. There is no comparison. And
those many Poles who today like to call the holocaust "indescriminate," as
bad for Poles as for Jews, are just trying to hide the fact that Poles
with their sticky fingers were eager to take everything that Jewish
families had owned, & assisted the Nazis without qualms in eradicating
Jews. Nor were Poles repentant after the war. Under the Soviets they
remained as antisemitic as ever. Today, Austria's intensely antisemitic
asshole Haider is a household name in Poland, & not with any condemnation.
If Austria can elect openly anti-Jewish holocaust-denying politicians,
there is hope for Poland doing the same!

Many of the most virulent antisemitic leaders in Poland are on the right,
some might even be regarded far right loonies, but alas there is no left
that counters them very sensibly. Leftist intellectual Ryszard Bugaj
condemned Gross's book on Polish attrocities against the Jews because,
Bugaj maintains, it is better not to reinforce the "stereotype" of Poles
being antisemites, & it is dangerous to provide such evidence that Jews
might be able to use to wrest properties away from Poles (who won them
fare & square by killing Jews in the 30s & 40s). Bugaj outright lied that
Jews would qualify for restitution of property under a re-privatization
act. Never mind that restitution would be just -- the law Bugaj cited
explicitely leaves Jews out by insisting no one can regain properties who
has not been a Polish citizen since 1999. So left, right, or in the
middle, the NORM in Poland is to be antisemitic, & it would take someone
unique to be otherwise -- & that person would likely instantly be
peripheralized as having the taint of Jewish blood even if they attend
their Catholic masses religiously.

There are moments of hop that suggest maybe Poland won't always be what it
has for so long been. Prime Minister Buzek acknowledged these weaknesses
of the Polish character & marched against antisemitism in Poland. But
then he nominated a notorious antisemite & holocaust-denier, Krzysztof
Kawecki, as Deputy Miniser of Education (of EDUCATION!). And of course
Walesa soon stopped being treated as a hero instead of the asshole he
actually was, though sadly his downfall was not because of his
antisemitism, that was not widely faulted. It's hard to be seriously
anti-nazi & not share the antisemitic standard of Polish culture when it
means confrontation with the Church, & probably the church will have to
change before Poles will change, though that's a "chicken or the egg"
riddle.

"Heros" like Walesa are not faulted for being intensely antisemitic --
Walesa told Kwasniewski he had no right to go to the Vatican because he
had Jews in his family tree. Well, Walesa did at least go down in flames
without any national support remaining to him, so maybe there is hope.
Still, what do rival footballer/soccer fans call supporters of the other
team? "Jews!" Its used by in the stands as being a worse thing to call
someone than "Mother****er." That's what Poland's really like. And opening
antisemitic organizations like Narodowe Odrodzenie Polski (and a dozen
similar organizaitons & political movements) are not hurting for
membership. The national catholic youth organization Mlodziez Wszechpolska
is famous for the murdering Jews & destroying what is left of Jewish
cemeteries -- just good catholic lads of the Polish type. It was no
coincidence the Catholic youth organization selected a name for itself
that before WWII was notoriously antisemitic. Has anyone stood up in the
parliament to condemn this Catholic organization? Certainly not. But
Witold Tomczak stood with 90 other parliamentarians to condemn a Polish
arts organization run by a man with a Jewish name & therefore Jewish
ancestors; never mind that Anda Rottenberg isn't Jewish, it's enough to be
tainted by the blood to incite the wrath of Polish elected officials.

This is just another reason that several variants of Godwin's law posit
the loser of any argument is whoever is first to call someone else a nazi.
Unless one is aactually speaking about nazis, it demeans peoples who were
marched into deathcamps to call anyone a nazi, especially if he was merely
mildly annoyed with you. I'm know much can be said in favor of Poles &
Poland, even if the dominant culture is antisemitic & naziistic to this
day. But nothing good can be said of any Pole mistaking bigotry (which
Poles are so good at) for naziism (which Poles supported & to this day do
not sufficiently deplore). Better to call someone you're ****ed off at a
soft stinky cat turd or a dog****ing pee drinking toadlicker. Being loose
with the term nazi lacks imagination & especially in the context of Poles
is all too often much more apropos of Poles.

-paghat the ratgirl

What's the matter? Did you get
laughed out of the video geek newsgroups for your ineptness and now you want
to terrorize a gardening group.

A half-wit troll neophyte cracker like you is not worthy of any detailed
insightful info, Dude.

Being rated by a know-nothing like you is a laugh riot.

Your mother sure likes doing that Polish keilbasa, at least she did the
other night!


--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
-from Peter Newell's "Wild Flowers"
See the Garden of Paghat the Ratgirl: http://www.paghat.com/


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