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Old 24-03-2009, 03:13 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners


Just like being literate a good example is primary. Some times
children forced to do anything just shuts down the process . Of course
not everyone has access to a potential garden. Community gardens can
and do fill the gap. But nothing beats going out back and playing in
the dirt all year long. Coupled with a garden catalogue perhaps some
garden art. Visits to all sort s of gardens simple and formal may
inspire.
If ones parents are not involved perhaps a crazy aunt or uncle can
substitute. I'm reminded of the star trek captain at academy whose
mentor was a gardener. The love and interest in nature can be learned
but not forced. To bring out the wonder is a hope and I feel a good
description of maturity.

Bill Inspire = to keep spirt in

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA







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Old 24-03-2009, 06:32 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners


"Jangchub" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 24 Mar 2009 10:13:13 -0400, Bill
wrote:


Just like being literate a good example is primary. Some times
children forced to do anything just shuts down the process . Of course
not everyone has access to a potential garden. Community gardens can
and do fill the gap. But nothing beats going out back and playing in
the dirt all year long. Coupled with a garden catalogue perhaps some
garden art. Visits to all sort s of gardens simple and formal may
inspire.
If ones parents are not involved perhaps a crazy aunt or uncle can
substitute. I'm reminded of the star trek captain at academy whose
mentor was a gardener. The love and interest in nature can be learned
but not forced. To bring out the wonder is a hope and I feel a good
description of maturity.

Bill Inspire = to keep spirt in


I'm an example of this sentiment. My father always took me to the
Brooklyn Botanical Gardens as well as the NY Botanical Gardens in the
Bronx. I was exposed to large parks as a kid like Prospect Park and
Central Park. It was a regular thing to do no Sunday. My father grew
tomatoes in pots.


Just like the typical Noo Yawker who has never been to Brooklyn..

It's "Brooklyn Botanic Gardens": http://www.bbg.org/



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Old 24-03-2009, 08:04 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners

In article ,
"brooklyn1" wrote:

"Jangchub" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 24 Mar 2009 10:13:13 -0400, Bill
wrote:


Just like being literate a good example is primary. Some times
children forced to do anything just shuts down the process . Of course
not everyone has access to a potential garden. Community gardens can
and do fill the gap. But nothing beats going out back and playing in
the dirt all year long. Coupled with a garden catalogue perhaps some
garden art. Visits to all sort s of gardens simple and formal may
inspire.
If ones parents are not involved perhaps a crazy aunt or uncle can
substitute. I'm reminded of the star trek captain at academy whose
mentor was a gardener. The love and interest in nature can be learned
but not forced. To bring out the wonder is a hope and I feel a good
description of maturity.

Bill Inspire = to keep spirt in


I'm an example of this sentiment. My father always took me to the
Brooklyn Botanical Gardens as well as the NY Botanical Gardens in the
Bronx. I was exposed to large parks as a kid like Prospect Park and
Central Park. It was a regular thing to do no Sunday. My father grew
tomatoes in pots.


Just like the typical Noo Yawker who has never been to Brooklyn..

It's "Brooklyn Botanic Gardens": http://www.bbg.org/


It came in as a cold chill
Wondered how to seek life
Failed and returned to frozen hell

Bill a Blaken fool

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA






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Old 24-03-2009, 08:23 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners

g'day bill,

the straw bale garden featured on our site we feel would be a good
project for kids to get their teeth into. something they can do from
go to we with no digging required no fallowing plant straightaway.

check our site:

http://www.lensgarden.com.au/



On Tue, 24 Mar 2009 10:13:13 -0400, Bill
wrote:
snipped
With peace and brightest of blessings,

len & bev

--
"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

http://www.lensgarden.com.au/
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Old 24-03-2009, 11:45 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners


"Bill" wrote in message
...

Just like being literate a good example is primary. Some times
children forced to do anything just shuts down the process . Of course
not everyone has access to a potential garden. Community gardens can
and do fill the gap. But nothing beats going out back and playing in
the dirt all year long. Coupled with a garden catalogue perhaps some
garden art. Visits to all sort s of gardens simple and formal may
inspire.
If ones parents are not involved perhaps a crazy aunt or uncle can
substitute. I'm reminded of the star trek captain at academy whose
mentor was a gardener. The love and interest in nature can be learned
but not forced. To bring out the wonder is a hope and I feel a good
description of maturity.

Bill Inspire = to keep spirt in

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


We had 3 kids between us. None of them were interested in gardening.






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Old 25-03-2009, 12:09 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners

In article ,
"D. Arlington" wrote:

"Bill" wrote in message
...

Just like being literate a good example is primary. Some times
children forced to do anything just shuts down the process . Of course
not everyone has access to a potential garden. Community gardens can
and do fill the gap. But nothing beats going out back and playing in
the dirt all year long. Coupled with a garden catalogue perhaps some
garden art. Visits to all sort s of gardens simple and formal may
inspire.
If ones parents are not involved perhaps a crazy aunt or uncle can
substitute. I'm reminded of the star trek captain at academy whose
mentor was a gardener. The love and interest in nature can be learned
but not forced. To bring out the wonder is a hope and I feel a good
description of maturity.

Bill Inspire = to keep spirt in

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


We had 3 kids between us. None of them were interested in gardening.




Heaven brings forth individuals in its own way. Still interests can
and do change.

Bill whose children know what compost is.

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA






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Old 25-03-2009, 05:53 AM posted to rec.gardens
z z is offline
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners

On Mar 24, 10:13*am, Bill wrote:
*Just *like being literate a good example is primary. *Some times
children forced to do anything just shuts down the process . *Of course
not everyone has access to *a potential garden. *Community gardens can
and do fill the gap. *But nothing beats going out back and playing in
the dirt all year long. *Coupled with a garden catalogue perhaps some
garden art. *Visits to all sort s of gardens simple and formal may
inspire.
* If ones parents are not involved perhaps a crazy aunt or uncle can
substitute. *I'm reminded of the star trek captain at academy whose
mentor was a gardener. *The love and interest in nature can be learned
but not forced. *To bring out the wonder is a hope and I feel a good
description of *maturity.

* Bill * * Inspire = to keep spirt in

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA



unfortunately, most parents give their kids the absolute worst
example; they start off gangbusters, toss around a lot of cash, dive
in without much of a plan, particularly regarding weed control; a crop
of peas comes up, about half of them get picked, by summer the weeds
are getting the upper hand, most of the other plants are submerged and
bug ridden, but a few tomato plants stick up from the sea; after a
couple of weeks of tomato harvest they can't even be bothered to pick
the tomatoes any more, and the whole mess stands there all winter as a
monument outside the back window to remind the kids that that's how
you're supposed to see a project through from start to finish.
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Old 25-03-2009, 06:13 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners

In article
,
z wrote:

On Mar 24, 10:13*am, Bill wrote:
*Just *like being literate a good example is primary. *Some times
children forced to do anything just shuts down the process . *Of course
not everyone has access to *a potential garden. *Community gardens can
and do fill the gap. *But nothing beats going out back and playing in
the dirt all year long. *Coupled with a garden catalogue perhaps some
garden art. *Visits to all sort s of gardens simple and formal may
inspire.
* If ones parents are not involved perhaps a crazy aunt or uncle can
substitute. *I'm reminded of the star trek captain at academy whose
mentor was a gardener. *The love and interest in nature can be learned
but not forced. *To bring out the wonder is a hope and I feel a good
description of *maturity.

* Bill * * Inspire = to keep spirt in

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA



unfortunately, most parents give their kids the absolute worst
example; they start off gangbusters, toss around a lot of cash, dive
in without much of a plan, particularly regarding weed control; a crop
of peas comes up, about half of them get picked, by summer the weeds
are getting the upper hand, most of the other plants are submerged and
bug ridden, but a few tomato plants stick up from the sea; after a
couple of weeks of tomato harvest they can't even be bothered to pick
the tomatoes any more, and the whole mess stands there all winter as a
monument outside the back window to remind the kids that that's how
you're supposed to see a project through from start to finish.


Maybe they can find something interesting to the children, that they can
support them in?
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being is
now subjected to contact with dangerous chemicals, from the moment of
conception until death." - Rachel Carson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WI29wVQN8Go

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1072040.html
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Old 25-03-2009, 05:44 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners

On Mar 24, 11:53*pm, z wrote:
On Mar 24, 10:13*am, Bill wrote:



*Just *like being literate a good example is primary. *Some times
children forced to do anything just shuts down the process . *Of course
not everyone has access to *a potential garden. *Community gardens can
and do fill the gap. *But nothing beats going out back and playing in
the dirt all year long. *Coupled with a garden catalogue perhaps some
garden art. *Visits to all sort s of gardens simple and formal may
inspire.
* If ones parents are not involved perhaps a crazy aunt or uncle can
substitute. *I'm reminded of the star trek captain at academy whose
mentor was a gardener. *The love and interest in nature can be learned
but not forced. *To bring out the wonder is a hope and I feel a good
description of *maturity.


* Bill * * Inspire = to keep spirt in


--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


unfortunately, most parents give their kids the absolute worst
example; they start off gangbusters, toss around a lot of cash, dive
in without much of a plan, particularly regarding weed control; a crop
of peas comes up, about half of them get picked, by summer the weeds
are getting the upper hand, most of the other plants are submerged and
bug ridden, but a few tomato plants stick up from the sea; after a
couple of weeks of tomato harvest they can't even be bothered to pick
the tomatoes any more, and the whole mess stands there all winter as a
monument outside the back window to remind the kids that that's how
you're supposed to see a project through from start to finish.


Sounds like my first few attempts

cheers

oz, moving steadily to pots and beds (no reference to nursing homes,
please)
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Old 26-03-2009, 01:17 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners


"z" wrote in message
...


unfortunately, most parents give their kids the absolute worst

example; they start off gangbusters, toss around a lot of cash, dive
in without much of a plan, particularly regarding weed control; a crop
of peas comes up, about half of them get picked, by summer the weeds
are getting the upper hand, most of the other plants are submerged and
bug ridden, but a few tomato plants stick up from the sea; after a
couple of weeks of tomato harvest they can't even be bothered to pick
the tomatoes any more, and the whole mess stands there all winter as a
monument outside the back window to remind the kids that that's how
you're supposed to see a project through from start to finish.

I've seen neighbor's gardens go this route over the years and places I've
lived. They're all too glued to their PCs and TVs to get out there and work
in the garden.



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Old 26-03-2009, 02:30 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Raising kids to be gardeners

In article ,
"D. Arlington" wrote:

"z" wrote in message
...


unfortunately, most parents give their kids the absolute worst

example; they start off gangbusters, toss around a lot of cash, dive
in without much of a plan, particularly regarding weed control; a crop
of peas comes up, about half of them get picked, by summer the weeds
are getting the upper hand, most of the other plants are submerged and
bug ridden, but a few tomato plants stick up from the sea; after a
couple of weeks of tomato harvest they can't even be bothered to pick
the tomatoes any more, and the whole mess stands there all winter as a
monument outside the back window to remind the kids that that's how
you're supposed to see a project through from start to finish.

I've seen neighbor's gardens go this route over the years and places I've
lived. They're all too glued to their PCs and TVs to get out there and work
in the garden.


You wonder if the parents talk about the food at dinner time, if it is a
hamburger from Mc Doo's, probably not. Ask them which is there favorite
squash recipe, or if they have a favorite variety of corn. Ask what
combination of greens make their favorite salad. When people ask their
opinions, they will feel empowered and take a position on a vegetable.
It's a lot like politics. Once invested in a vegetable, they will be
more interested in growing it. If they find that what they grow tastes
better than what comes from the store, you will have a gardener. But you
can't just give them a pack of seeds and say grow this because they have
no investment in the outcome.
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being is
now subjected to contact with dangerous chemicals, from the moment of
conception until death." - Rachel Carson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WI29wVQN8Go

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1072040.html
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Old 28-12-2018, 04:37 AM
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Smile Imperative to teach kids gardening

It's an old discussion, but dear to my heart. Like someone else said in an earlier post, kids need to see older people gardening to get drawn into it. Our kids saw my mum potter around the garden. She got them to help with planting and pulling out weeds. Slowly they wrote out cards for her trays. When our daughter had to put a project together we were surprised to see her use flash cards with gardening details from her gran's patch! Interestingly our daughter taught her gran to use technology and now she happily shares images and gardening trivia with friends using her phone. School projects and bonding happened over gardening!


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