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Old 08-04-2011, 03:02 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Dry farming is entirely new to me David but from what I understand, a
deep planting hole with lose soil forces the roots to go deep in search
of ground moisture. This is said to give a better root system for the
plant to absorb nutrients. I have also read that a clay or clay loam
soil lends itself better to dry farming than does a sandy soil. The
clay simply retains more moisture for a longer period of time. There
are some areas where chefs seek out dry farmed tomatoes because of the
taste. They also sell for a much higher price which in part is due to
the lower yield I would suspect.

Rich


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Old 08-04-2011, 04:26 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Rich, Lets us know how your experiment goes.

You maybe interested in some other areas of taste improvement that are
getting more attention lately.

http://njfarmfresh.rutgers.edu/docum...matoFlavor.pdf

http://www.growingformarket.com/arti...-tomato-flavor

http://www.seaagri.com/docs/tomato_t...al_rutgers.pdf

good luck
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Old 08-04-2011, 04:51 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Gunner wrote:

Rich, Lets us know how your experiment goes.


Stop encouraging him... I'd rather SEE some documentation that the
webtv troll actually gardens than his constant inane gum flapping.
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Old 08-04-2011, 05:33 PM posted to rec.gardens
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In article ,
(EVP MAN) wrote:

Dry farming is entirely new to me David but from what I understand, a
deep planting hole with lose soil forces the roots to go deep in search
of ground moisture. This is said to give a better root system for the
plant to absorb nutrients. I have also read that a clay or clay loam
soil lends itself better to dry farming than does a sandy soil. The
clay simply retains more moisture for a longer period of time. There
are some areas where chefs seek out dry farmed tomatoes because of the
taste. They also sell for a much higher price which in part is due to
the lower yield I would suspect.

Rich


And smaller size of the tomatoes. That's not a criticism. It's just a
way to concentrate flavor.


And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of
corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only
one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential
service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
- Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels


=
--
- Billy
Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the clouds of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron.
- Dwight D. Eisenhower, 16 April 1953
http://wn.com/black_panther_party
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_vN0--mHug

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Old 08-04-2011, 08:02 PM posted to rec.gardens
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I usually don't respond to Don Rickles aka Brooklyn's insults but YES,
I do have a small 500 sq. ft. garden in the back yard of the home I own
which by the way is paid for and situated in a beautiful college town of
central PA. As far as web tv goes, I'm on the msn one plan. Web tv is
in my den and a $2600 Gateway computer resides in my family room Now
just a few simple questions for you if you care to answer. I'll keep
them very basic so even you might understand them!

1. How old are you?
2. Do you rent or own?
3. How large is your garden or do you plant in containers like I used to
do when I was somewhat poor?

Don't get me wrong. There is certainly nothing wrong with being poor
BUT it's sure damn unhandy........LOL

4. Are you any relation to Don Rickles OR are you just a Don Rickles
wanna be?
5. Is our current US president your idol?
If so, WHY???

Rich



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Old 09-04-2011, 08:11 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Post Hole Digger And Dry Farming Tomatoes This Season

On Apr 6, 7:26*am, (EVP MAN) wrote:

This year I'll be trying an experiment ........ *Any advice will
indeed be helpful

Rich from PA



You are attempting to water stress your plant in order to produce a
superior taste, is that accurate?

As I said earlier, do share your results and don't let a "Shelton
rant" rattle ya. However, do keep what Sheldon and David wrote in
the back of your mind because you will see what they are talking
about. You are digging a container in the ground which is not the best
route to go for a number of reasons. Also you are not truly dry
farming, you are just restricting water, which w/o a cover to control
the environment is worthless. Humidity is another factor. You must
consider the plant's water use efficiency and the plant physiology. I
believe you should expect more BER in this experiment of yours.
Personally I think your taking the wrong approach to improving tomato
flavor. I am of the opinion it's not the water... it's more genetics
and nutrients. But experimenting is fun and one way to learn.

I assume you have your soil test results to guide you before you
start digging these container holes in the clay soil?

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Old 09-04-2011, 08:52 PM posted to rec.gardens
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My entire garden is dug down to at least 10 to 12 inches. I use a
Mantis tiller to work up the soil. The extra depth down another foot is
where each plant will go. I figure it won't hurt to have nice lose soil
to that depth. And yes, dry farming does produce fruit with more BER
from what I understand.

Rich

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Old 10-04-2011, 10:18 PM posted to rec.gardens
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On Apr 9, 12:52*pm, (EVP MAN) wrote:
My entire garden is dug down to at least 10 to 12 inches. *I use a
Mantis tiller to work up the soil. *The extra depth down another foot is
where each plant will go. *I figure it won't hurt to have nice lose soil
to that depth. *And yes, *dry farming does produce fruit with more BER
from what I understand. *

Rich


OK, good to know. I was assuming you actually meant: " I'll simply
use a post hole digger and dig down about two and a half foot deep
where each plant will be placed. "

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Old 31-03-2018, 08:59 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Post Hole Digger And Dry Farming Tomatoes This Season

Just curious- how did this work out? Posthole diggers /Tomatoes?
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Old 31-03-2018, 06:26 PM posted to rec.gardens
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On Sat, 31 Mar 2018 00:59:54 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:
Just curious- how did this work out? Posthole diggers /Tomatoes?


Posthole diggers are for when you want to make deep but narrow
holes... but doesn't loosen the soil radially for the plant roots to
expand. And unless the ground was previously tilled a posthole digger
can be backbreaking labor, especially if you hit a large rock and need
to dig it out to continue or start over with a new hole in a different
spot... by the time you dig a half dozen holes you'be be ready to
quit.

For tomatoes you don't need a lot of depth but you want a hole about
2' in diameter... much easier to accomplish with a garden spade... dig
down about 8" and to achieve more depth mound amended soil up about
8", and put in your plants in on an angle and cover the stems to the
first true leaves.. If you are going to do much planting you really
need a rototiller... for a home sized garden the Mantis is more than
adequate, and it's very easy to handle (an eight year old can use it),
plus it will easily dig holes for planting. Once I tested a Mantis at
a dealer I immediately bought one and sold my 8 HP beast. I bought
this one ten years ago and it has needed no repairs... twice a year it
tills my 50' X 50' vegetable garden plus does other chores.
https://www.amazon.com/Mantis-2-Cycl...70_&dpSrc=srch




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Old 01-04-2018, 06:51 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Post Hole Digger And Dry Farming Tomatoes This Season

On 3/31/2018 1:26 PM, Sheldon wrote:
On Sat, 31 Mar 2018 00:59:54 -0700 (PDT),

wrote:
Just curious- how did this work out? Posthole diggers /Tomatoes?


Posthole diggers are for when you want to make deep but narrow
holes... but doesn't loosen the soil radially for the plant roots to
expand. And unless the ground was previously tilled a posthole digger
can be backbreaking labor, especially if you hit a large rock and need
to dig it out to continue or start over with a new hole in a different
spot... by the time you dig a half dozen holes you'be be ready to
quit.

For tomatoes you don't need a lot of depth but you want a hole about
2' in diameter... much easier to accomplish with a garden spade... dig
down about 8" and to achieve more depth mound amended soil up about
8", and put in your plants in on an angle and cover the stems to the
first true leaves.. If you are going to do much planting you really
need a rototiller... for a home sized garden the Mantis is more than
adequate, and it's very easy to handle (an eight year old can use it),
plus it will easily dig holes for planting. Once I tested a Mantis at
a dealer I immediately bought one and sold my 8 HP beast. I bought
this one ten years ago and it has needed no repairs... twice a year it
tills my 50' X 50' vegetable garden plus does other chores.
https://www.amazon.com/Mantis-2-Cycl...70_&dpSrc=srch


Yer pretty tough fer such a little shit:

https://imgur.com/a/22Eqa




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