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Old 19-12-2016, 11:32 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

I have a yard hydrant about 40 ft away from a barn. Every winter its the
same fight with garden hoses freezing up. I need to fill a water tank in
the barn for a few horses about every 2 days.

This hydrant is uphill from the barn, and there is a pole right near
that hydrant. My thought is to run a piece of stainless steel cable from
that pole to the barn. Then attach the hose to the cable with wire-ties.

The hose then runs into the barn, and to the stock tank. It will slope
downhill all the way, so as soon as the tank is filled, I will remove
the female hose end from the hydrant and the water inside the hose will
drain into the tank, so the hose can not freeze.

However, I must make sure there are no sags in the hose, where water
will collect and freeze.

The other problem I see, is that where the hose enters the barn wall,
rain water will run down the outside of the hose and into the barn. I
cant put a drip loop in the hose, because that spot would freeze in
winter. I'm thinking I'll have to put some silicone caulk where it
enters the wall.

Anyhow, I thought I'd ask if anyone on here has tried something like
this? I am also thinking of using some other material, instead of a
hose. I'm aware that a hose exposed to sunlight wont last real long, so
I could also use that black polyurathane pipe that's made for
underground use, or some of that PEX pipe. That Poly pipe is kind of
stiff, so I dont know if I could get all the sags out of it. And being
black, how well will that pipe hold up in sunlight?

So, what about that PEX pipe? How does that hold up in sunlight? I've
never used it, but have felt it in stores, and it seems rather stiff
also. I know it needs a special tool to attach fittings, and I will need
to attach a fitting on the one end by the hydrant, so I can run a short
hose from that pipe to the hydrant. I'm not too worried about needing
that tool, because I can get the hardware store to clamp that fitting
for a buck, before I hang the pipe.

Anyhow, what would be the best material to use? Poly pipe, PEX pipe, or
just a garden hose?




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Old 19-12-2016, 02:40 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 05:32:27 -0600, wrote:

I have a yard hydrant about 40 ft away from a barn. Every winter its the
same fight with garden hoses freezing up. I need to fill a water tank in
the barn for a few horses about every 2 days.

This hydrant is uphill from the barn, and there is a pole right near
that hydrant. My thought is to run a piece of stainless steel cable from
that pole to the barn. Then attach the hose to the cable with wire-ties.

The hose then runs into the barn, and to the stock tank. It will slope
downhill all the way, so as soon as the tank is filled, I will remove
the female hose end from the hydrant and the water inside the hose will
drain into the tank, so the hose can not freeze.

However, I must make sure there are no sags in the hose, where water
will collect and freeze.

The other problem I see, is that where the hose enters the barn wall,
rain water will run down the outside of the hose and into the barn. I
cant put a drip loop in the hose, because that spot would freeze in
winter. I'm thinking I'll have to put some silicone caulk where it
enters the wall.

Anyhow, I thought I'd ask if anyone on here has tried something like
this? I am also thinking of using some other material, instead of a
hose. I'm aware that a hose exposed to sunlight wont last real long, so
I could also use that black polyurathane pipe that's made for
underground use, or some of that PEX pipe. That Poly pipe is kind of
stiff, so I dont know if I could get all the sags out of it. And being
black, how well will that pipe hold up in sunlight?

So, what about that PEX pipe? How does that hold up in sunlight? I've
never used it, but have felt it in stores, and it seems rather stiff
also. I know it needs a special tool to attach fittings, and I will need
to attach a fitting on the one end by the hydrant, so I can run a short
hose from that pipe to the hydrant. I'm not too worried about needing
that tool, because I can get the hardware store to clamp that fitting
for a buck, before I hang the pipe.

Anyhow, what would be the best material to use? Poly pipe, PEX pipe, or
just a garden hose?


Seems to me rather than the Rube Goldberg approach 40' is no biggie to
carry a couple of buckets, especially downhill to your barn... have
you considered a wagon with a few of 5 gallon buckets... should be a
walk in the park to lug a couple empty buckets back uphill. Anyway
that's how I water shrubs and trees that're too far from a hose bib,
by pulling a cart full of buckets with my tractor, better than
dragging a few hundred feet of garden hose filled with water. My barn
is 350' from a hose bib so I lug two 1 gallon milk jugs of water every
day for watering the feral cats... I have electric in the barn but no
water, heated water bowls work fine in winter. I thought of a water
line when I had the electric cable buried but water can present
freeze-up problems in winter no matter how well thought out. It's a
lot simpler to just carry water or haul water with a cart. If you
have a small garden tractor and a cart with a bunch of five gallon
plastic contractor's buckets your problem is solved. This is all you
need, that cart will hold 10 five gallon buckets:
http://i65.tinypic.com/2mhwgso.jpg
I even have a driver:
http://i67.tinypic.com/2lkpf8x.jpg
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Old 19-12-2016, 10:03 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 09:40:16 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

Seems to me rather than the Rube Goldberg approach 40' is no biggie to
carry a couple of buckets, especially downhill to your barn... have
you considered a wagon with a few of 5 gallon buckets... should be a
walk in the park to lug a couple empty buckets back uphill. Anyway
that's how I water shrubs and trees that're too far from a hose bib,
by pulling a cart full of buckets with my tractor, better than
dragging a few hundred feet of garden hose filled with water. My barn
is 350' from a hose bib so I lug two 1 gallon milk jugs of water every
day for watering the feral cats... I have electric in the barn but no
water, heated water bowls work fine in winter. I thought of a water
line when I had the electric cable buried but water can present
freeze-up problems in winter no matter how well thought out. It's a
lot simpler to just carry water or haul water with a cart. If you
have a small garden tractor and a cart with a bunch of five gallon
plastic contractor's buckets your problem is solved. This is all you
need, that cart will hold 10 five gallon buckets:


This dont answer my question.

What you're saying is what I do NOW.
Much of the time using a hose is just too much trouble, so I carry
buckets. Being 66 years old, this is not easy anymore. Using a cart and
/or tractor is not an option. There are 2 concrete steps between the
barn and hydrant. As winter goes on, those steps tend to ice up and
eventually becomes a ramp. I have fallen several times there already.
Those steps would ice up much less if I was not splashing water on them
while carrying buckets of water.

This is not a matter of carrying a couple gallon jugs, it's at least 12
five gallon pails every other day, and doing that this past weekend with
windchills at around 40 deg. below zero was no fun.

Installing something as I suggest, is not a major job and not costly,
I'm just trying to determine what would be the best materials to use.



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Old 19-12-2016, 10:52 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

snips

This is not a matter of carrying a couple gallon jugs, it's at least 12
five gallon pails every other day, and doing that this past weekend with
windchills at around 40 deg. below zero was no fun.




Just curious - how do you prevent the " yard hydrant "
from freezing up ?
John T.

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Old 20-12-2016, 12:13 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 17:52:48 -0500, wrote:

snips

This is not a matter of carrying a couple gallon jugs, it's at least 12
five gallon pails every other day, and doing that this past weekend with
windchills at around 40 deg. below zero was no fun.




Just curious - how do you prevent the " yard hydrant "
from freezing up ?
John T.


They are made to not freeze. They sit above the ground, but are about 9
feet long. At least 6 feet is in the ground. The water in that 9' piece
(pipe) drains down into the ground as soon as they are turned off. They
work quite well, but in the extreme cold, they do get stiff. I always
apply vaseline around the shaft that's under the handle. That keeps that
shaft from sticking to the seals in there, and lubes the seals too.

To learn more about them, Go to:
http://www.woodfordmfg.com/woodford/...Model-y34.html

One point, they MUST be adjusted properly or the water dont drain down,
and if that happens, it's a real pain to unthaw them. I always check
them before winter to make sure they are working properly....




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Old 20-12-2016, 03:50 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 16:03:29 -0600, wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 09:40:16 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

Seems to me rather than the Rube Goldberg approach 40' is no biggie to
carry a couple of buckets, especially downhill to your barn... have
you considered a wagon with a few of 5 gallon buckets... should be a
walk in the park to lug a couple empty buckets back uphill. Anyway
that's how I water shrubs and trees that're too far from a hose bib,
by pulling a cart full of buckets with my tractor, better than
dragging a few hundred feet of garden hose filled with water. My barn
is 350' from a hose bib so I lug two 1 gallon milk jugs of water every
day for watering the feral cats... I have electric in the barn but no
water, heated water bowls work fine in winter. I thought of a water
line when I had the electric cable buried but water can present
freeze-up problems in winter no matter how well thought out. It's a
lot simpler to just carry water or haul water with a cart. If you
have a small garden tractor and a cart with a bunch of five gallon
plastic contractor's buckets your problem is solved. This is all you
need, that cart will hold 10 five gallon buckets:


This dont answer my question.

What you're saying is what I do NOW.
Much of the time using a hose is just too much trouble, so I carry
buckets. Being 66 years old, this is not easy anymore. Using a cart and
/or tractor is not an option. There are 2 concrete steps between the
barn and hydrant. As winter goes on, those steps tend to ice up and
eventually becomes a ramp. I have fallen several times there already.
Those steps would ice up much less if I was not splashing water on them
while carrying buckets of water.

This is not a matter of carrying a couple gallon jugs, it's at least 12
five gallon pails every other day, and doing that this past weekend with
windchills at around 40 deg. below zero was no fun.

Installing something as I suggest, is not a major job and not costly,
I'm just trying to determine what would be the best materials to use.


I'm older than you (73) and I carry water buckets all the time...
perhaps you are too old to have horses.
From my experience living in the northern Catskills where it gets very
cold in winter I have learned that the best way to transport water in
winter is in buckets by cart... hoses/pipes are very problematic in
winter.
And you don't have far to go, 40' is nothing, I can pee 40'. LOL
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Old 20-12-2016, 08:11 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 22:50:07 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

I'm older than you (73) and I carry water buckets all the time...
perhaps you are too old to have horses.
From my experience living in the northern Catskills where it gets very
cold in winter I have learned that the best way to transport water in
winter is in buckets by cart... hoses/pipes are very problematic in
winter.
And you don't have far to go, 40' is nothing, I can pee 40'. LOL




I already answered you, and explained my situation.
Perhaps you are too old to comprehend what you read on a newsgroup.

If you wish to carry pails, feel free to do so.

I don't care to carry buckets of water.

Brains are always stronger than muscles.
I'll use my brains to design this hose method, and prevent pulled
muscles, falls on the ice, and soaked pants legs.

If anyone on here can stick to the question, please let me know what
materials would work best for this project.


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Old 20-12-2016, 01:36 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

wrote:
On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 22:50:07 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

I'm older than you (73) and I carry water buckets all the time...
perhaps you are too old to have horses.
From my experience living in the northern Catskills where it gets
very cold in winter I have learned that the best way to transport
water in winter is in buckets by cart... hoses/pipes are very
problematic in winter.
And you don't have far to go, 40' is nothing, I can pee 40'. LOL




I already answered you, and explained my situation.
Perhaps you are too old to comprehend what you read on a newsgroup.

If you wish to carry pails, feel free to do so.

I don't care to carry buckets of water.

Brains are always stronger than muscles.
I'll use my brains to design this hose method, and prevent pulled
muscles, falls on the ice, and soaked pants legs.

If anyone on here can stick to the question, please let me know what
materials would work best for this project.


Water hose will work just fine . But instead of using zip ties , use some
tie wire , spiral it around both the hose and support cable to keep the hose
from sagging . At the bottom instead of a drip loop tie a rag or something
around the hose and let the tag end hang free , the water will run down that
instead of into the barn . Still a good idea to caulk the hole too though .
Have you considered just leaving it running slowly ? Depending on how cold
you get , that might be enough to keep it from freezing , but you'd have to
match the flow rate to the usage ...or have it overflow to the outside .
That also comes with it's own set of problems , if the overflow freezes (and
the supply doesn't) you could have quite a mess inside .
Another thing you might consider is a vacuum break at the faucet
connection , lets air in but seals against pressure . That will save you
having to unhook and drain the hose and standpipe after every use .
--
Snag


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Old 20-12-2016, 09:49 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

Roxopoop wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:

I'm older than you (73) and I carry water buckets all the time...
perhaps you are too old to have horses.
From my experience living in the northern Catskills where it gets very
cold in winter I have learned that the best way to transport water in
winter is in buckets by cart... hoses/pipes are very problematic in
winter.
And you don't have far to go, 40' is nothing, I can pee 40'. LOL


I already answered you, and explained my situation.
Perhaps you are too old to comprehend what you read on a newsgroup.

If you wish to carry pails, feel free to do so.
I don't care to carry buckets of water.

Brains are always stronger than muscles.
I'll use my brains to design this hose method, and prevent pulled
muscles, falls on the ice, and soaked pants legs.


Perhaps if you made an appointment with a Urologist you wouldn't be
peeing your pants.

How nuch mucle do you think is required to drive a tractor... less
than walking. And what's with those concrete steps you conveniently
invented... if you live with a barn full of horses you have to have
enough property to tractor around any concrete steps... do you think a
tractor cares that it needs to travel a few feet from as the crow
flies... and most any tractor can navigate a whole staircase easier
than a horse, like it's just a rough slope.
I don't think you possess enough IQ to identify your own dilemma let
alone how to resolve it... your only problem is you.

This is really all you need and use of a backhoe for an hour... or buy
a $15 shovel and hire a strong teen for a day... bury it below the
freeze line and wrap the last few feet with thermatape... anyone who
keeps horses or any livestock in a cold climate would advise you
exactly the same.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Raindrip-5-...Tubing/3136515
https://www.lowes.com/pd/EasyHeat-12...-Cable/1068425
I still think hauling water with a cart hitched to a garden tractor is
a better solution. I can't imagine anyone who keeps horses not having
at least a small tractor, how do you haul hay bales, how do you haul
away all the manure and muck. Even a snow blower can haul a cart.
Ask at the local high school, any of their athletes would appreciate a
days pay and they'll appreciate the work out too, digging a forty foot
trench by hand is a better work out than a whole day pumping iron at
Gold's Gym. Hire two, one at each end and they'll meet in the middle,
it'll be a competition, they'll finish sooner. I hired two teenage
brothers from the HS wrestling team to groom the 350' trench to my
barn used to bury the electric line. Cost me the same $250 plus $100
worth of topsoil I would have had to pay the guy who dug the trench
only I'd rather give the job to local kids. They hoed out all the
rocks into buckets and hauled them with my cart to my creek to fill in
eroded spots I pointed out. With the bucket on my tractor I spread
topsoil all along the trench and they raked it smooth. Was a good job
and they appreciated the pay.

Whoa! Scratch all that... you have a barn full of horses, have them
haul their own stinkin' water. LOL

However, Mr. Poop, you are an ingrate, It's very obvious that you
didn't want any help, you posted like any common troll... what kinda
pinheaded schmuck can afford to keep horses who can't afford to have
someone plumb a teensy 40' water line. DUH


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Old 21-12-2016, 12:13 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

Brooklyn1 wrote:
Roxopoop wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:

I'm older than you (73) and I carry water buckets all the time...
perhaps you are too old to have horses.
From my experience living in the northern Catskills where it gets
very cold in winter I have learned that the best way to transport
water in winter is in buckets by cart... hoses/pipes are very
problematic in winter.
And you don't have far to go, 40' is nothing, I can pee 40'. LOL


I already answered you, and explained my situation.
Perhaps you are too old to comprehend what you read on a newsgroup.

If you wish to carry pails, feel free to do so.
I don't care to carry buckets of water.

Brains are always stronger than muscles.
I'll use my brains to design this hose method, and prevent pulled
muscles, falls on the ice, and soaked pants legs.


Perhaps if you made an appointment with a Urologist you wouldn't be
peeing your pants.

How nuch mucle do you think is required to drive a tractor... less
than walking. And what's with those concrete steps you conveniently
invented... if you live with a barn full of horses you have to have
enough property to tractor around any concrete steps... do you think a
tractor cares that it needs to travel a few feet from as the crow
flies... and most any tractor can navigate a whole staircase easier
than a horse, like it's just a rough slope.
I don't think you possess enough IQ to identify your own dilemma let
alone how to resolve it... your only problem is you.

This is really all you need and use of a backhoe for an hour... or buy
a $15 shovel and hire a strong teen for a day... bury it below the
freeze line and wrap the last few feet with thermatape... anyone who
keeps horses or any livestock in a cold climate would advise you
exactly the same.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Raindrip-5-...Tubing/3136515
https://www.lowes.com/pd/EasyHeat-12...-Cable/1068425
I still think hauling water with a cart hitched to a garden tractor is
a better solution. I can't imagine anyone who keeps horses not having
at least a small tractor, how do you haul hay bales, how do you haul
away all the manure and muck. Even a snow blower can haul a cart.
Ask at the local high school, any of their athletes would appreciate a
days pay and they'll appreciate the work out too, digging a forty foot
trench by hand is a better work out than a whole day pumping iron at
Gold's Gym. Hire two, one at each end and they'll meet in the middle,
it'll be a competition, they'll finish sooner. I hired two teenage
brothers from the HS wrestling team to groom the 350' trench to my
barn used to bury the electric line. Cost me the same $250 plus $100
worth of topsoil I would have had to pay the guy who dug the trench
only I'd rather give the job to local kids. They hoed out all the
rocks into buckets and hauled them with my cart to my creek to fill in
eroded spots I pointed out. With the bucket on my tractor I spread
topsoil all along the trench and they raked it smooth. Was a good job
and they appreciated the pay.

Whoa! Scratch all that... you have a barn full of horses, have them
haul their own stinkin' water. LOL

However, Mr. Poop, you are an ingrate, It's very obvious that you
didn't want any help, you posted like any common troll... what kinda
pinheaded schmuck can afford to keep horses who can't afford to have
someone plumb a teensy 40' water line. DUH


Why are you being such a dick ? And who says your way is the only way ? We
had horses when I was a kid , we used a hose to fill the tank - but ours was
apparently a lot bigger than his because we only had to fill once a week or
so . And before you ask , yes it was subfreezing and sometimes subzero
weather , we had a heater in the tank .
--
Snag




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Old 21-12-2016, 12:29 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

Terry Coombs wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:
Roxopoop wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:

I'm older than you (73) and I carry water buckets all the time...
perhaps you are too old to have horses.
From my experience living in the northern Catskills where it gets
very cold in winter I have learned that the best way to transport
water in winter is in buckets by cart... hoses/pipes are very
problematic in winter.
And you don't have far to go, 40' is nothing, I can pee 40'. LOL

I already answered you, and explained my situation.
Perhaps you are too old to comprehend what you read on a newsgroup.

If you wish to carry pails, feel free to do so.
I don't care to carry buckets of water.

Brains are always stronger than muscles.
I'll use my brains to design this hose method, and prevent pulled
muscles, falls on the ice, and soaked pants legs.


Perhaps if you made an appointment with a Urologist you wouldn't be
peeing your pants.

How nuch mucle do you think is required to drive a tractor... less
than walking. And what's with those concrete steps you conveniently
invented... if you live with a barn full of horses you have to have
enough property to tractor around any concrete steps... do you think a
tractor cares that it needs to travel a few feet from as the crow
flies... and most any tractor can navigate a whole staircase easier
than a horse, like it's just a rough slope.
I don't think you possess enough IQ to identify your own dilemma let
alone how to resolve it... your only problem is you.

This is really all you need and use of a backhoe for an hour... or buy
a $15 shovel and hire a strong teen for a day... bury it below the
freeze line and wrap the last few feet with thermatape... anyone who
keeps horses or any livestock in a cold climate would advise you
exactly the same.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Raindrip-5-...Tubing/3136515
https://www.lowes.com/pd/EasyHeat-12...-Cable/1068425
I still think hauling water with a cart hitched to a garden tractor is
a better solution. I can't imagine anyone who keeps horses not having
at least a small tractor, how do you haul hay bales, how do you haul
away all the manure and muck. Even a snow blower can haul a cart.
Ask at the local high school, any of their athletes would appreciate a
days pay and they'll appreciate the work out too, digging a forty foot
trench by hand is a better work out than a whole day pumping iron at
Gold's Gym. Hire two, one at each end and they'll meet in the middle,
it'll be a competition, they'll finish sooner. I hired two teenage
brothers from the HS wrestling team to groom the 350' trench to my
barn used to bury the electric line. Cost me the same $250 plus $100
worth of topsoil I would have had to pay the guy who dug the trench
only I'd rather give the job to local kids. They hoed out all the
rocks into buckets and hauled them with my cart to my creek to fill in
eroded spots I pointed out. With the bucket on my tractor I spread
topsoil all along the trench and they raked it smooth. Was a good job
and they appreciated the pay.

Whoa! Scratch all that... you have a barn full of horses, have them
haul their own stinkin' water. LOL

However, Mr. Poop, you are an ingrate, It's very obvious that you
didn't want any help, you posted like any common troll... what kinda
pinheaded schmuck can afford to keep horses who can't afford to have
someone plumb a teensy 40' water line. DUH


Why are you being such a dick ? And who says your way is the only way ? We
had horses when I was a kid , we used a hose to fill the tank - but ours was
apparently a lot bigger than his because we only had to fill once a week or
so . And before you ask , yes it was subfreezing and sometimes subzero
weather , we had a heater in the tank .


Shove a heater up your big black lying ass, COOMBS!
Coombs is a black name, a FAGGOT BLACK name.
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Old 21-12-2016, 01:06 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Running waterline into a barn

On 2016-12-21 00:29:50 +0000, Brooklyn1 said:

Shove a heater up your big black lying ass, COOMBS!
Coombs is a black name, a FAGGOT BLACK name.


Everyone get ready for a torrent of lovely and cute photos of B1's
precious property and tractor-driving cats. What a pathetic **** you
are, Sheldon.

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Old 21-12-2016, 01:28 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Brooklyn1 wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:



However, Mr. Poop, you are an ingrate, It's very obvious that you
didn't want any help, you posted like any common troll... what kinda
pinheaded schmuck can afford to keep horses who can't afford to have
someone plumb a teensy 40' water line. DUH


Why are you being such a dick ? And who says your way is the only
way ? We had horses when I was a kid , we used a hose to fill the
tank - but ours was apparently a lot bigger than his because we only
had to fill once a week or so . And before you ask , yes it was
subfreezing and sometimes subzero weather , we had a heater in the
tank .


Shove a heater up your big black lying ass, COOMBS!
Coombs is a black name, a FAGGOT BLACK name.


My English , Danish , and Viking ancestors would be really surprised to
find out that they were all black ... I think I'll wait until after her 3rd
consecutive orgasm to let my wife know I'm gay .
--
Snag


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On Tue, 20 Dec 2016 18:13:48 -0600, "Terry Coombs"
wrote:


However, Mr. Poop, you are an ingrate, It's very obvious that you
didn't want any help, you posted like any common troll... what kinda
pinheaded schmuck can afford to keep horses who can't afford to have
someone plumb a teensy 40' water line. DUH


Why are you being such a dick ? And who says your way is the only way ? We
had horses when I was a kid , we used a hose to fill the tank - but ours was
apparently a lot bigger than his because we only had to fill once a week or
so . And before you ask , yes it was subfreezing and sometimes subzero
weather , we had a heater in the tank .
--
Snag


Yes, I do have a heater in my tank. I also plan to buy a larger tank,
since mine is small and does need to be filled too often. (In warm
weather I use two of these smaller tanks, but if I have to buy another
heater and use twice the electricity, I may as well just get a bigger
tank, and will probably save money in the long run, with the price of
electricity.

As far as your comment about "being such a dick", I see I came to this
group for the first time, and apparently snagged the group's resident
troll right off the bat. Particularly when this troll has no idea what
my property looks like, and the fact that digging in a new hydrant
(inside the barn), would require ripping up concrete, and all sorts of
other costly things. And yeah, I have 3 farm tractors, none of which I'd
even consider trying to drive over concrete steps, and going another
direction, would require excavating a hill, and totally changing my
fencing. ALL OF WHICH IS TOTALLY UNNECESSARY, when I can spend under $50
to run some cable and rig up a hose to make life easier.... My reason
for considering the PEX pipe, is because I was told that it can
withstand freezing and not break. Of course, since this "pipeline" will
only be connected for the minutes it takes to fill the tank, and water
runs down hill, it should not freeze, but I'm still aware that every dip
in any pipe or hose, is a spot which will develop ice in cold weather. I
guess that means that no matter what I use, I will need to use a lot of
wire ties, or wire it so the "dips" are minimal.

As far as the foul mouthed resident troll on this newsgroup, I just
activated my filters. I guess every newsgroup has at least one of them
these days. Probably a big part of the reason that all the newsgoups are
dying.

Thanks for your reply!

  #15   Report Post  
Old 22-12-2016, 01:03 AM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2009
Posts: 33
Default Running waterline into a barn

Terry Coombs said

Brooklyn1 wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:



However, Mr. Poop, you are an ingrate, It's very obvious that you
didn't want any help, you posted like any common troll... what
kinda pinheaded schmuck can afford to keep horses who can't afford
to have someone plumb a teensy 40' water line. DUH

Why are you being such a dick ? And who says your way is the only
way ? We had horses when I was a kid , we used a hose to fill the
tank - but ours was apparently a lot bigger than his because we
only had to fill once a week or so . And before you ask , yes it
was subfreezing and sometimes subzero weather , we had a heater in
the tank .


Shove a heater up your big black lying ass, COOMBS!
Coombs is a black name, a FAGGOT BLACK name.


My English , Danish , and Viking ancestors would be really
surprised to
find out that they were all black ... I think I'll wait until after
her 3rd consecutive orgasm to let my wife know I'm gay .


We have an internal USENET server running at our large company. It used
to be full of useful conversations and friendly arguement. Those were
the days.

Sadly, everyone's moved on to Yammer (a panty-wasted POS Facebook look-
like with 95% frills and 5% content.

Thanks for the above tirade - it's needed peridically to keep the blood
flowing. :-)

Flame on!

---
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus



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