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Old 24-01-2003, 03:29 PM
LeeAnne
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

Allow me to vent and/or dream . . .

Man oh man is it stinking cold up/down/over here in New England (depending
on where *you* are reading this from). I'm bummed that there is too much
snow on the local pond -- this would have been THE BEST winter for skating
in, well, I don't know how many years!! Don't get me wrong -- I love snow,
but now it's not even shovelable (is that a word?? lol) to clear off a spot
to skate. It's sooooo cold out. The coldest since the late 1800's they are
saying, so much for global warming and El Nino!!!

Hooray for the Farmer's Almanac, they nailed it right on (as they do 99.9%
of the time I believe) and I guess we are to be on the lookout for a summer
full of thunderstorms -- I love thunderstorms!

Being from New England and loving New England you'll not hear any serious
complaints out of me. I am, however, longing for the peek of the crocus
thru the snow and the birds to be coming back for the summer in my yard -
orioles, mockers and catbirds, hummers, various flycatchers, and the mystery
ones that I only hear in the woods or barely catch a glimpse of. Every year
I seem to see something new as I add new plants or more water or different
foods.

I want to put my trellis back up and let the moon flowers, trumpet vine and
morning glories crawl their beautiful way up and over it. I want to
unfreeze my bird splashing pool and see if the frozen frog will come back to
life (seriously doubt it, but it will be interesting), I want to go buy
pansies and salvia and other small annuals for the front row that add the
INSTANT gratification of color. I want the giant lilac bushes to bloom so I
can smell their heavenly scent - even if it is short lived it's very worth
it.

I want to pick fresh raspberries and, hopefully, grow some veggies this
year - cukes & zucchini for sure, we'll see about others. I want to battle
the Asian Lily Beetles, drowning them in soapy water before they can destroy
what I call my tiger lilies. More milky spore on the lawn for grub
control - however I welcome the skunks and flicker's to come and make their
bellies full as well -- who cares if there are holes in the lawn, they need
to eat too!

I want the 'house shopping' Tree Swallows to come check the bluebird boxes
out in my backyard again, one box was already taken by chickadees who didn't
take too kindly to the, um, visitors poking their heads into the hole, lol.
The other box was a bit of a different style and the swallows were not
interested in it - so I bought another like the one they did like and I'm
keeping my fingers crossed for this year. I got to stand in my backyard and
watch those two beautiful, sort of iridescent, birds fly low and slow in
great circles around the yard, sometimes coming within just a few feet of
me -- I was crouched by a wall. It was like a great bird ballet. And, of
course, I'd be overjoyed if bluebirds actually took up residence in the
boxes named for them. Maybe I'll put up a couple more and see what happens.
I'll take baby chickadees though, they are adorable.

I'm hoping I still have coyotes in the 'hood as I had NO issues with
woodchucks last year for the first time in many many moons. Love those
coyotes! But I'm sure my neighbors won't be too happy if their cat gets
nabbed - that's why my Max stays indoors.

I love the seasonal changes winter, spring, summer and fall bring me here -
but it's time for a change NOW gosh darn it :-) The days are getting longer
.. . . hoo-freakin'-ray!

Thanks for listening,
Happy Friday everybody!
LeeAnne

--
------
If you're an insomniac, agnostic, dyslexic do you lay
awake at night wondering if there is a dog?
-----



  #2   Report Post  
Old 24-01-2003, 05:26 PM
madgard
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

SUPERB!!!!!!! (((((((((((((((((((huge Maddie HUG))))))))))))))))))))))
madgardener
"LeeAnne" wrote in message
...


Allow me to vent and/or dream . . .



Man oh man is it stinking cold up/down/over here in New England (depending
on where*you* are reading this from). I'm bummed that there is too much snow
on the localpond -- this would have been THE BEST winter for skating in,
well, I don't know howmany years!! Don't get me wrong -- I love snow, but
now it's not even shovelable (isthat a word?? lol) to clear off a spot to
skate. It's sooooo cold out. The coldest sincethe late 1800's they are
saying, so much for global warming and El Nino!!!



Hooray for the Farmer's Almanac, they nailed it right on (as they do 99.9%
of the time Ibelieve) and I guess we are to be on the lookout for a summer
full of thunderstorms -- Ilove thunderstorms!



Being from New England and loving New England you'll not hear any serious
complaints outof me. I am, however, longing for the peek of the crocus thru
the snow and the birds tobe coming back for the summer in my yard -

orioles, mockers and catbirds, hummers, various flycatchers, and the mystery
ones that Ionly hear in the woods or barely catch a glimpse of. Every year I
seem to see something new asI add new plants or more water or different
foods.



I want to put my trellis back up and let the moon flowers, trumpet vine and
morning gloriescrawl their beautiful way up and over it. I want to unfreeze
my bird splashing pooland see if the frozen frog will come back to life
(seriously doubt it, but it will be interesting), Iwant to go buy pansies
and salvia and other small annuals for the front row that add theINSTANT
gratification of color. I want the giant lilac bushes to bloom so I can
smelltheir heavenly scent - even if it is short lived it's very worth it.



I want to pick fresh raspberries and, hopefully, grow some veggies this
year - cukes &zucchini for sure, we'll see about others. I want to battle
the Asian Lily Beetles, drowningthem in soapy water before they can destroy
what I call my tiger lilies. More milkyspore on the lawn for grub control -
however I welcome the skunks and flicker's tocome and make their bellies
full as well -- who cares if there are holes in the lawn, theyneed to eat
too!



I want the 'house shopping' Tree Swallows to come check the bluebird boxes
out in mybackyard again, one box was already taken by chickadees who didn't
take too kindly tothe, um, visitors poking their heads into the hole, lol.

The other box was a bit of a different style and the swallows were not
interested in it - so Ibought another like the one they did like and I'm
keeping my fingers crossed for this year. Igot to stand in my backyard and
watch those two beautiful, sort of iridescent, birds fly lowand slow in
great circles around the yard, sometimes coming within just a few feet of
me-- I was crouched by a wall. It was like a great bird ballet. And, of
course, I'd beoverjoyed if bluebirds actually took up residence in the boxes
named for them. Maybe I'llput up a couple more and see what happens.

I'll take baby chickadees though, they are adorable.



I'm hoping I still have coyotes in the 'hood as I had NO issues with
woodchucks last year forthe first time in many many moons. Love those
coyotes! But I'm sure my neighborswon't be too happy if their cat gets
nabbed - that's why my Max stays indoors.



I love the seasonal changes winter, spring, summer and fall bring me here -

but it's time for a change NOW gosh darn it :-) The days are getting longer
.. . . hoo-freakin'-ray!



Thanks for listening, Happy Friday everybody!

LeeAnne

--

------

If you're an insomniac, agnostic, dyslexic do you lay awake at night
wondering if there is adog?

-----





  #3   Report Post  
Old 24-01-2003, 08:12 PM
Derryl Killan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

Hi Leeanne Thanks for the inspirational posting. I am in Calgary and it
is -20 C. with no hopes of spring til May/ June.

Derryl





....
Allow me to vent and/or dream . . .

Man oh man is it stinking cold up/down/over here in New England (depending
on where *you* are reading this from). I'm bummed that there is too much
snow on the local pond -- this would have been THE BEST winter for skating
in, well, I don't know how many years!! Don't get me wrong -- I love

snow,
but now it's not even shovelable (is that a word?? lol) to clear off a

spot
to skate. It's sooooo cold out. The coldest since the late 1800's they

are
saying, so much for global warming and El Nino!!!

Hooray for the Farmer's Almanac, they nailed it right on (as they do 99.9%
of the time I believe) and I guess we are to be on the lookout for a

summer
full of thunderstorms -- I love thunderstorms!

Being from New England and loving New England you'll not hear any serious
complaints out of me. I am, however, longing for the peek of the crocus
thru the snow and the birds to be coming back for the summer in my yard -
orioles, mockers and catbirds, hummers, various flycatchers, and the

mystery
ones that I only hear in the woods or barely catch a glimpse of. Every

year
I seem to see something new as I add new plants or more water or different
foods.

I want to put my trellis back up and let the moon flowers, trumpet vine

and
morning glories crawl their beautiful way up and over it. I want to
unfreeze my bird splashing pool and see if the frozen frog will come back

to
life (seriously doubt it, but it will be interesting), I want to go buy
pansies and salvia and other small annuals for the front row that add the
INSTANT gratification of color. I want the giant lilac bushes to bloom so

I
can smell their heavenly scent - even if it is short lived it's very worth
it.

I want to pick fresh raspberries and, hopefully, grow some veggies this
year - cukes & zucchini for sure, we'll see about others. I want to

battle
the Asian Lily Beetles, drowning them in soapy water before they can

destroy
what I call my tiger lilies. More milky spore on the lawn for grub
control - however I welcome the skunks and flicker's to come and make

their
bellies full as well -- who cares if there are holes in the lawn, they

need
to eat too!

I want the 'house shopping' Tree Swallows to come check the bluebird boxes
out in my backyard again, one box was already taken by chickadees who

didn't
take too kindly to the, um, visitors poking their heads into the hole,

lol.
The other box was a bit of a different style and the swallows were not
interested in it - so I bought another like the one they did like and I'm
keeping my fingers crossed for this year. I got to stand in my backyard

and
watch those two beautiful, sort of iridescent, birds fly low and slow in
great circles around the yard, sometimes coming within just a few feet of
me -- I was crouched by a wall. It was like a great bird ballet. And, of
course, I'd be overjoyed if bluebirds actually took up residence in the
boxes named for them. Maybe I'll put up a couple more and see what

happens.
I'll take baby chickadees though, they are adorable.

I'm hoping I still have coyotes in the 'hood as I had NO issues with
woodchucks last year for the first time in many many moons. Love those
coyotes! But I'm sure my neighbors won't be too happy if their cat gets
nabbed - that's why my Max stays indoors.

I love the seasonal changes winter, spring, summer and fall bring me

here -
but it's time for a change NOW gosh darn it :-) The days are getting

longer
. . . hoo-freakin'-ray!

Thanks for listening,
Happy Friday everybody!
LeeAnne

--
------
If you're an insomniac, agnostic, dyslexic do you lay
awake at night wondering if there is a dog?
-----




  #4   Report Post  
Old 24-01-2003, 08:44 PM
LeeAnne
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

Hi Mad - coming from you that is a HUGE complement - THANK YOU, you made my
day! and ((((((HUGS)))))) right back at'cha!

"madgard" wrote in message
...

SUPERB!!!!!!! (((((((((((((((((((huge Maddie HUG))))))))))))))))))))))
madgardener
"LeeAnne" wrote in message
...


Allow me to vent and/or dream . . .




  #5   Report Post  
Old 25-01-2003, 02:17 AM
Erin & Steve
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

Xref: news7 rec.gardens:206662

I want to feel the sun on my back and get itchy from the dirt in my socks. I
want to worry about the mud I'm tracking into the house and feel sore in the
back from digging all day.
I want to pick cherry tomatoes off the vine and toss them up for my dog to
catch (she LOVES tomatoes!). Then she'll roll around in the grass while I
cut my snapdragons, dahlia and zinnia for an arrangement to be brought over
to a friends BBQ... sigh...
Thanks for inspiring this dream!



  #6   Report Post  
Old 25-01-2003, 02:36 AM
Dave Fouchey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

Spring? Spring? I seem to remember hearing about such a season...

Leeanne thanks, that hit the spot on this snowy, blowy 18 degree day.
With the lakes a solid sheet of milk white ice and snow and nary a
hint of green anywhere that was like a drink of cool water on a hot
summers day, a relief!

Dave

Sterling Heights, Michigan
On Fri, 24 Jan 2003 20:12:40 GMT, "Derryl Killan"
wrote:

Hi Leeanne Thanks for the inspirational posting. I am in Calgary and it
is -20 C. with no hopes of spring til May/ June.

Derryl





...
Allow me to vent and/or dream . . .

Man oh man is it stinking cold up/down/over here in New England (depending
on where *you* are reading this from). I'm bummed that there is too much
snow on the local pond -- this would have been THE BEST winter for skating
in, well, I don't know how many years!! Don't get me wrong -- I love

snow,
but now it's not even shovelable (is that a word?? lol) to clear off a

spot
to skate. It's sooooo cold out. The coldest since the late 1800's they

are
saying, so much for global warming and El Nino!!!

Hooray for the Farmer's Almanac, they nailed it right on (as they do 99.9%
of the time I believe) and I guess we are to be on the lookout for a

summer
full of thunderstorms -- I love thunderstorms!

Being from New England and loving New England you'll not hear any serious
complaints out of me. I am, however, longing for the peek of the crocus
thru the snow and the birds to be coming back for the summer in my yard -
orioles, mockers and catbirds, hummers, various flycatchers, and the

mystery
ones that I only hear in the woods or barely catch a glimpse of. Every

year
I seem to see something new as I add new plants or more water or different
foods.

I want to put my trellis back up and let the moon flowers, trumpet vine

and
morning glories crawl their beautiful way up and over it. I want to
unfreeze my bird splashing pool and see if the frozen frog will come back

to
life (seriously doubt it, but it will be interesting), I want to go buy
pansies and salvia and other small annuals for the front row that add the
INSTANT gratification of color. I want the giant lilac bushes to bloom so

I
can smell their heavenly scent - even if it is short lived it's very worth
it.

I want to pick fresh raspberries and, hopefully, grow some veggies this
year - cukes & zucchini for sure, we'll see about others. I want to

battle
the Asian Lily Beetles, drowning them in soapy water before they can

destroy
what I call my tiger lilies. More milky spore on the lawn for grub
control - however I welcome the skunks and flicker's to come and make

their
bellies full as well -- who cares if there are holes in the lawn, they

need
to eat too!

I want the 'house shopping' Tree Swallows to come check the bluebird boxes
out in my backyard again, one box was already taken by chickadees who

didn't
take too kindly to the, um, visitors poking their heads into the hole,

lol.
The other box was a bit of a different style and the swallows were not
interested in it - so I bought another like the one they did like and I'm
keeping my fingers crossed for this year. I got to stand in my backyard

and
watch those two beautiful, sort of iridescent, birds fly low and slow in
great circles around the yard, sometimes coming within just a few feet of
me -- I was crouched by a wall. It was like a great bird ballet. And, of
course, I'd be overjoyed if bluebirds actually took up residence in the
boxes named for them. Maybe I'll put up a couple more and see what

happens.
I'll take baby chickadees though, they are adorable.

I'm hoping I still have coyotes in the 'hood as I had NO issues with
woodchucks last year for the first time in many many moons. Love those
coyotes! But I'm sure my neighbors won't be too happy if their cat gets
nabbed - that's why my Max stays indoors.

I love the seasonal changes winter, spring, summer and fall bring me

here -
but it's time for a change NOW gosh darn it :-) The days are getting

longer
. . . hoo-freakin'-ray!

Thanks for listening,
Happy Friday everybody!
LeeAnne

--
------
If you're an insomniac, agnostic, dyslexic do you lay
awake at night wondering if there is a dog?
-----




  #7   Report Post  
Old 25-01-2003, 04:53 AM
madgard
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

awwwwww, yer too kind, lady........ I'd drag my toe, but I have still got
ice and snow outside and kinda like my toes...............( I can't find
your e-,mail in my addy files, send a howdy so I can reclaim it if yer
inclined.........) madgardener


"LeeAnne" wrote in message
...
Hi Mad - coming from you that is a HUGE complement - THANK YOU, you made

my
day! and ((((((HUGS)))))) right back at'cha!




  #8   Report Post  
Old 28-01-2003, 05:19 AM
Lhemlock
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

Get a grip people. If you didn't have a cold period, you wouldn't have your
native plant species and your native wildlife. On the other hand, what's
wrong with living in an environmentally controlled bubble?
  #9   Report Post  
Old 28-01-2003, 11:44 AM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

An environmentally controled bubble..... no thank you. I love the fact
that every day is a different day regards to the weather,my favourite
type of weather is the frost. Anyway, if every day was the same
people would have to think if something alse to talk about!
  #10   Report Post  
Old 29-01-2003, 04:19 AM
marg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

Thank you This is definitely what I needed on this dreadfully cold
night here in NY.
Ahhhh, I got away, even if it was for just a small moment in time.


  #11   Report Post  
Old 29-01-2003, 02:33 PM
LeeAnne
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

Thank you I think we are gripped quite firmly. I wouldn't want to live in a
bubble - I love the changes that New England brings . . . don't like the
weather? Just wait a minute.

I love Winter and snow and snowmen, uh, snowpersons, sledding, skiing, doing
donuts in the car :-) and snowball fights. I love the dead silence you get
sometimes when the snow absorbs all noise except your feet squeaking on it .
.. . but there is NOTHING like the coming of spring and those first bulbs
sprouting up - you know the ones you planted last year and hope they come
up, which would make the blisters you got worth it. :-)

LeeAnne

"Lhemlock" wrote in message
...
Get a grip people. If you didn't have a cold period, you wouldn't have

your
native plant species and your native wildlife. On the other hand, what's
wrong with living in an environmentally controlled bubble?



  #12   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2003, 09:05 PM
Dwight Sipler
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

harrison wrote:

... Further, it is an indisputable right of New
Englanders to complain about the weather. The Pilgrims had to take an oath
that they would do so before they were allowed to step on the rock...





Address by Samuel Clemens at the New England Society's Seventy-First
Annual Dinner, New York City, December 22, 1876.

I reverently believe that the Maker who made us all makes everything in
New England but the weather. I don't know who makes that, but I think it
must be raw apprentices in the weather-clerk's factory who experiment
and learn how, in New England, for board and clothes, and then are
promoted to make weather for countries that require a good article, and
will take their custom elsewhere if they don't get it.

There is a sumptuous variety about the New England weather that compels
the stranger's admiration -- and regret. The weather is always doing
something there; always attending strictly to business; always getting
up new designs and trying them on the people to see how they will go.
But it gets through more business in spring than in any other season. In
the spring I have counted one hundred and thirty-six different kinds of
weather inside of four-and-twenty hours. It was I that made the fame and
fortune of that man that had that marvelous collection of weather on
exhibition at the Centennial, that so astounded the foreigners. He was
going to travel all over the world and get specimens from all the
climes. I said, "Don't you do it; you come to New England on a favorable
spring day." I told him what we could do in the way of style, variety,
and quantity. Well, he came and he made his collection in four days. As
to variety, why, he confessed that he got hundreds of kinds of weather
that he had never heard of before. And as to quantity -- well, after he
had picked out and discarded all that was blemished in any way, he not
only had weather enough, but weather to spare; weather to hire out;
weather to sell; to deposit; weather to invest; weather to give to the
poor.

The people of New England are by nature patient and forbearing, but
there are some things which they will not stand. Every year they kill a
lot of poets for writing about "Beautiful Spring." These are generally
casual visitors, who bring their notions of spring from somewhere else,
and cannot, of course, know how the natives feel about spring. And so
the first thing they know the opportunity to inquire how they feel has
permanently gone by.

Old Probabilities has a mighty reputation for accurate prophecy, and
thoroughly well deserves it. You take up the paper and observe how
crisply and confidently he checks off what today's weather is going to
be on the Pacific, down South, in the Middle States, in the Wisconsin
region. See him sail along in the joy and pride of his power till he
gets to New England, and then see his tail drop. He doesn't know what
the weather is going to be in New England. Well, he mulls over it, and
by-and-by he gets out something about like this: Probably northeast to
southwest winds, varying to the southward and westward and eastward and
points between, high and low barometer swapping around from place to
place; probable areas of rain, snow, hail, and drought, succeeded or
preceded by earthquakes, with thunder and lightning. Then he jots down
his postscript from his wandering mind, to cover accidents. "But it is
possible that the programme may be wholly changed in the mean time."

Yes, one of the brightest gems in the New England weather is the
dazzling uncertainty of it. There is only one thing certain about it:
you are certain there is going to be plenty of it - - a perfect grand
review; but you never can tell which end of the procession is going to
move first. You fix up for the drought; you leave your umbrella in the
house and sally out, and two to one you get drowned. You make up your
mind that the earthquake is due; you stand from under, and take hold of
something to steady yourself, and the first thing you know you get
struck by lightning. These are great disappointments; but they can't be
helped. The lightning there is peculiar; it is so convincing, that when
it strikes a thing it doesn't leave enough of that thing behind for you
to tell whether-- Well, you'd think it was something valuable, and a
Congressman had been there. And the thunder. When the thunder begins to
merely tune up and scrape and saw, and key up the instruments for the
performance, strangers say, "Why, what awful thunder you have here!" But
when the baton is raised and the real concert begins, you'll find that
stranger down in the cellar with his head in the ash-barrel.

Now as to the size of the weather in New England -- lengthways, I mean.
It is utterly disproportioned to the size of that little country. Half
the time, when it is packed as full as it can stick, you will see that
New England weather sticking out beyond the edges and projecting around
hundreds and hundreds of miles over the neighboring States. She can't
hold a tenth part of her weather. You can see cracks all about where she
has strained herself trying to do it. I could speak volumes about the
inhuman perversity of the New England weather, but I will give but a
single specimen. I like to hear rain on a tin roof. So I covered part of
my roof with tin, with an eye to that luxury. Well, sir, do you think it
ever rains on that tin? No, sir, skips it every time.

Mind, in this speech I have been trying merely to do honor to the New
England weather -- no language could do it justice. But, after all,
there is at least one or two things about that weather (or, if you
please, effects produced by it) which we residents would not like to
part with. If we hadn't our bewitching autumn foliage, we should still
have to credit the weather with one feature which compensates for all
its bullying vagaries -- the ice-storm: when a leafless tree is clothed
with ice from the bottom to the top -- ice that is as bright and clear
as crystal; when every bough and twig is strung with ice-beads, frozen
dew-drops, and the whole tree sparkles cold and white, like the Shah of
Persia's diamond plume. Then the wind waves the branches and the sun
comes out and turns all those myriads of beads and drops to prisms that
glow and burn and flash with all manner of colored fires, which change
and change again with inconceivable rapidity from blue to red, from red
to green, and green to gold -- the tree becomes a spraying fountain, a
very explosion of dazzling jewels; and it stands there the acme, the
climax, the supremest possibility in art or nature, of bewildering,
intoxicating, intolerable magnificence. One cannot make the words too
strong.
  #13   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2003, 09:27 PM
harrison
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh But For Spring To Come (long)

I agree totally, LeeAnne. Further, it is an indisputable right of New
Englanders to complain about the weather. The Pilgrims had to take an oath
that they would do so before they were allowed to step on the rock.
Meanwhile isn't this a lovely short heat wave we are having now? 33F seems
positively balmy when I consider that my outdoor thermometer read -3 on
Tuesday. In any case, I know spring is coming--my impatiens have started to
sprout. Eugenia, zone 6, two twons west of Boston
"LeeAnne" wrote in message
...
Thank you I think we are gripped quite firmly. I wouldn't want to live in

a
bubble - I love the changes that New England brings . . . don't like the
weather? Just wait a minute.

I love Winter and snow and snowmen, uh, snowpersons, sledding, skiing,

doing
donuts in the car :-) and snowball fights. I love the dead silence you

get
sometimes when the snow absorbs all noise except your feet squeaking on it

..
. . but there is NOTHING like the coming of spring and those first bulbs
sprouting up - you know the ones you planted last year and hope they come
up, which would make the blisters you got worth it. :-)

LeeAnne

"Lhemlock" wrote in message
...
Get a grip people. If you didn't have a cold period, you wouldn't have

your
native plant species and your native wildlife. On the other hand,

what's
wrong with living in an environmentally controlled bubble?





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