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Old 01-09-2003, 01:42 PM
Rick
 
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Default Black Eyed Susans

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants or do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...



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Old 01-09-2003, 03:32 PM
Tom Randy
 
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Default Black Eyed Susans

On Mon, 01 Sep 2003 08:41:29 -0400, Rick wrote:

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants or
do they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...



You can get them as small plants at your local garden centers. Buy already
started plants. They spread pretty quickly too, in the spring when they get
about 3-4 inches high I transplant some from each patch to other areas and
they take right off and bloom for me. I have them all over the place here.
Every 2-3 years you may want to thin out the patches so they bloom better.

Spring or fall is the time to plant them.

Tom
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Old 01-09-2003, 04:02 PM
paghat
 
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Default Black Eyed Susans

In article , "Rick"
wrote:

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants or do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...


There are many species of black-eyed susans, but the majority sold will be
either Rudbeckia fulgida, which is an annual, or R. hirta, which is a
long-lived perennial, & I think the latter is more to be recommended.

If you want the annuals, from seed would be preferable. The perennial also
grows easily from seed, but you can get a head start on them planting them
from potted starts or gallon clumps already mature. The most popular
cloned cultivar of R. hirta is "Goldsturm" which does not grow true from
seed & is best purchased as a mature gallon sized. If you settle for seeds
that are labeled "Goldsturm," they'll grow into something "close enough to
get by" but probably taller, thinner, &amp less compact. Most other R.
hirta varieties grow true from seeds.

I grow R. hirta with Echinacea purpurea which have the same soil &
watering needs & the same kind of tall reflexed flowers, but purply pink
instead of bright yellow. Also there's a white Echinacea. The white,
purple, & bright yellow flowers last all summer & much of autumn in a
mixed border in full sun.

Here's a page about "Goldsturm" Black-eyed Susan:
http://www.paghat.com/rudbeckia.html
Here's a semi-dwarf echinacea that looks great with rudbeckia:
http://www.paghat.com/echinacea.html
And here's the white echinacea:
http://www.paghat.com/echinacea3.html

-paghat the ratgirl

--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
-from Peter Newell's "Wild Flowers"
See the Garden of Paghat the Ratgirl: http://www.paghat.com/
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Old 01-09-2003, 04:42 PM
Cereoid-UR12-
 
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Default Black Eyed Susans

Holy Pimlico, Batman!!! Holy Seabiscuit, Robin!!!!

Most people here in the USA automatically think Rudbeckia hirta when one
says "Black-Eyed Susan" and that is most likely what the poster meant in the
first place. Still we have absolutely no idea where Rick actually is on the
planet because he never said.

The South African annual Thunbergia alata is called "Black-Eyed Susan Vine"
and is not as well know in the USA as is native Rudbeckia hirta. In fact,
the common name of the former is in allusion to its flowers superficially
resembling the latter!!!!!

Still, the bottom line is that common names are worthless.


paghat wrote in message
news
In article 1g0m60l.e9vnxvw5tnz1N%[email protected] imited.net,
(Jim W) wrote:

Rick wrote:


We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants

or do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...


Assuming you mean Thunbergia, (orange with black 'eyes' at the centre)
They are easy to start from seed providing it is warm enough. Here in
London they don't really take off until the temp gets up near to 20 C

Sow in spring in ordinary pots of seed compost.
//
Jim


Well now, there's a perfect example of why not to post common names only.
I automatically assumed Rudbeckia, not Thunbergia!

-paghat the ratgirl

--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
-from Peter Newell's "Wild Flowers"
See the Garden of Paghat the Ratgirl:
http://www.paghat.com/




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Old 01-09-2003, 05:12 PM
Dave Fouchey
 
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Default Black Eyed Susans

Paghat thanks for the ideas on mixing Rudbeckia and Echinacea in a
sunny border area, obvious when you think about it but there's the
catch, you have to think about it! They would make a very nice edge
planting along my driveway...and be that much less turf grass to cut
as well!G As for the driveway it is an old compacted gravel drive
with lots of Chamomile growing in it in spite of the vehicle traffic.
It was there when we moved in and I refuse to do anything to
discourage it.

Again thanks for the ideas.

Dave

On Mon, 01 Sep 2003 08:02:18 -0700,
(paghat) wrote:

In article , "Rick"
wrote:

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants or do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...


There are many species of black-eyed susans, but the majority sold will be
either Rudbeckia fulgida, which is an annual, or R. hirta, which is a
long-lived perennial, & I think the latter is more to be recommended.

If you want the annuals, from seed would be preferable. The perennial also
grows easily from seed, but you can get a head start on them planting them
from potted starts or gallon clumps already mature. The most popular
cloned cultivar of R. hirta is "Goldsturm" which does not grow true from
seed & is best purchased as a mature gallon sized. If you settle for seeds
that are labeled "Goldsturm," they'll grow into something "close enough to
get by" but probably taller, thinner, &amp less compact. Most other R.
hirta varieties grow true from seeds.

I grow R. hirta with Echinacea purpurea which have the same soil &
watering needs & the same kind of tall reflexed flowers, but purply pink
instead of bright yellow. Also there's a white Echinacea. The white,
purple, & bright yellow flowers last all summer & much of autumn in a
mixed border in full sun.

Here's a page about "Goldsturm" Black-eyed Susan:
http://www.paghat.com/rudbeckia.html
Here's a semi-dwarf echinacea that looks great with rudbeckia:
http://www.paghat.com/echinacea.html
And here's the white echinacea:
http://www.paghat.com/echinacea3.html

-paghat the ratgirl


Dave Fouchey, WA4EMR
http://photos.yahoo.com/davefouchey
Southeastern Lower Michigan
42° 35' 20'' N,
82° 58' 37'' W
GMT Offset: -5
Time Zone: Eastern
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Old 01-09-2003, 05:32 PM
Tyra Trevellyn
 
Posts: n/a
Default Black Eyed Susans

From: (paghat)
Date: Mon, Sep 1, 2003 11:02 AM
Message-id:

In article , "Rick"
wrote:

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants

or do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...


There are many species of black-eyed susans, but the majority sold will
be
either Rudbeckia fulgida, which is an annual, or R. hirta, which is a
long-lived perennial, & I think the latter is more to be recommended.

If you want the annuals, from seed would be preferable. The perennial also
grows easily from seed, but you can get a head start on them planting them
from potted starts or gallon clumps already mature. The most popular
cloned cultivar of R. hirta is "Goldsturm" which does not grow true from
seed & is best purchased as a mature gallon sized. If you settle for seeds
that are labeled "Goldsturm," they'll grow into something "close enough
to
get by" but probably taller, thinner, &amp less compact. Most other R.
hirta varieties grow true from seeds.


snip

paghat:
The info is good, but you've switched the species names: 'Goldsturm' is a
cultivar of Rudbeckia fulgida (a reliable perennial), known sometimes as
Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantiii. Rudbeckia hirta is hardy to Zone 5 but
tends to behave more like a biennial or short-lived perennial (and can be grown
as an annual). Cultivar names are, among others, 'Marmalade' and 'Irish Eyes.'

Best,
Tyra
nNJ usa z7a
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Old 01-09-2003, 09:02 PM
paghat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Black Eyed Susans

In article ,
oway (Tyra Trevellyn) wrote:

From:
(paghat)
Date: Mon, Sep 1, 2003 11:02 AM
Message-id:

In article , "Rick"
wrote:

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants

or do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...


There are many species of black-eyed susans, but the majority sold will
be
either Rudbeckia fulgida, which is an annual, or R. hirta, which is a
long-lived perennial, & I think the latter is more to be recommended.

If you want the annuals, from seed would be preferable. The perennial also
grows easily from seed, but you can get a head start on them planting them
from potted starts or gallon clumps already mature. The most popular
cloned cultivar of R. hirta is "Goldsturm" which does not grow true from
seed & is best purchased as a mature gallon sized. If you settle for seeds
that are labeled "Goldsturm," they'll grow into something "close enough
to
get by" but probably taller, thinner, &amp less compact. Most other R.
hirta varieties grow true from seeds.


snip

paghat:
The info is good, but you've switched the species names: 'Goldsturm' is a
cultivar of Rudbeckia fulgida (a reliable perennial), known sometimes as
Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantiii. Rudbeckia hirta is hardy to Zone 5 but
tends to behave more like a biennial or short-lived perennial (and can

be grown
as an annual). Cultivar names are, among others, 'Marmalade' and 'Irish Eyes.'

Best,
Tyra
nNJ usa z7a


Sorry 'bout that, I thanks for quick correction.

-paggers

--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
-from Peter Newell's "Wild Flowers"
See the Garden of Paghat the Ratgirl:
http://www.paghat.com/
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Old 02-09-2003, 02:02 AM
Pelvis Popcan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Black Eyed Susans

For most people where I live, "Black Eyed Susan" means Rudbeckia
Goldsturm.

These only propagate through cuttings. So, the best way to grow them
is to buy them potted from your local nursery. A few plants will
quickly multiply over the years. They can be planted from pots into
the ground any time of the spring or summer.

There *are* seed packets available that say "Rudbeckia Goldsturm" on
them, but what these are is a strain. They are Goldsturms hybridized
with other species so that viable seeds are produced, so what you get
are mixed Goldsturm hybrids. In my experience, these plants are
usually pretty small and don't flower that much the first year. The
flowers themselves *resemble* Goldsturms, but are not the same thing.

Annual vanities such as "Glorissa Daisy" were first bred in the 1950's
by Burpee seed. They grow 2-3 feet tall and have lots of nice great
big yellow flowers. If you like to plant seed, I recommend Glorissa
Daisy.


"Rick" wrote:

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants or do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...


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Old 02-09-2003, 04:02 AM
Françoise
 
Posts: n/a
Default Black Eyed Susans

I planted three type of Rudbeckia last winter from seeds under light in t=
he
house. They were Toto, Marmelade and Prairie Sun. All were gorgeous all s=
ummer
and still are.

Fran=E7oise.

Rick wrote:

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants o=

r do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...




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Old 03-09-2003, 01:42 AM
GrampysGurl
 
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Default Black Eyed Susans


Well now, there's a perfect example of why not to post common names only.
I automatically assumed Rudbeckia, not Thunbergia!

-paghat the ratgirl


That was my immediate thought as well.
Colleen
zone 5 Connecticut
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Old 04-09-2003, 06:02 AM
Chris Owens
 
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Default Black Eyed Susans

Rick wrote:

We would like to have black eyed susans in our yard. Do we buy plants or do
they come in seeds? When is the best time of year to plant. Thanks...


They come as either; and you plant either of them in the spring
or fall.

Chris Owens




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Old 06-09-2003, 03:02 PM
TOM KAN PA
 
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Default Black Eyed Susans

The Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) has been the official Maryland flower
since 1918 when it was designated the "Floral Emblem" of Maryland by the
General Assembly (Chapter 458, Acts of 1918; Code State Government Article,
sec. 13-305).

In his Species Plantarum (1753), the Swedish naturalist Linnaeus described and
named the flower Rudbeckia after Olav Rudbeck and his son, both professors at
the University of Uppsala, and hirta from the Latin meaning "rough hairy".

Black-Eyed Susans are perennial daisies or coneflowers, members of the
sunflower family (Asteraceae). The flower heads measure 2 to 3 inches in
diameter with yellow rays circling a dark-brown, spherical center. Commonly
found in fields and on roadsides, they bloom between May and August, reaching 2
to 3 feet in height. They are native to the United States, east of the Rocky
Mountains.


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Old 06-09-2003, 08:42 PM
Cereoid-UR12-
 
Posts: n/a
Default Black Eyed Susans

Even though the "Black Eyed Susan" has long been associated with the races
at Pimlico and is the state flower of Maryland, it is not native to
Maryland. It is native farther west but has migrated eastward along the
railroad lines and into other open places.

Still it is not as bad a choice for state flower as those for some other the
other states.

Georgia, Iowa, New York and North Dakota have all chose the rose as their
state flower. At least all of them but New York have chosen native Rosa
species.

You would have thought that Georgia would have chosen the peach blossom but
it isn't so.

http://www.50states.com/flower.htm


TOM KAN PA wrote in message
...
The Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) has been the official Maryland

flower
since 1918 when it was designated the "Floral Emblem" of Maryland by the
General Assembly (Chapter 458, Acts of 1918; Code State Government

Article,
sec. 13-305).

In his Species Plantarum (1753), the Swedish naturalist Linnaeus described

and
named the flower Rudbeckia after Olav Rudbeck and his son, both professors

at
the University of Uppsala, and hirta from the Latin meaning "rough hairy".

Black-Eyed Susans are perennial daisies or coneflowers, members of the
sunflower family (Asteraceae). The flower heads measure 2 to 3 inches in
diameter with yellow rays circling a dark-brown, spherical center.

Commonly
found in fields and on roadsides, they bloom between May and August,

reaching 2
to 3 feet in height. They are native to the United States, east of the

Rocky
Mountains.






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