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Old 10-05-2004, 06:03 PM
kc
 
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Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

Hello All

My tomato plants were about 6" inches tall when about 10 days ago a frost
killed all their foliage down to the ground. I was ready to purchase new
plants, but noticed that the base of the frost-bitten plants are sending up
new foliage.

Will these plants recover enough to bear fruit, or should I just replace
them with new plants? And even if they are able to recover, are they now too
far behind? I'm assuming it will take them a while just to get back to the
6" height they were at before the frost.
..
Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.

Kenn



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Old 11-05-2004, 12:05 AM
Brian
 
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Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

That they have sprouted indicates that at least one pair of axils had been
buried. Reduce the shoots to a single stem and if the weather is kind and
suitable you will not have lost much time.
They are cheap to replace so why not buy anew and retain the old ones out
of curiosity?
Regards Brian.
"kc" wrote in message
...
Hello All

My tomato plants were about 6" inches tall when about 10 days ago a frost
killed all their foliage down to the ground. I was ready to purchase new
plants, but noticed that the base of the frost-bitten plants are sending

up
new foliage.

Will these plants recover enough to bear fruit, or should I just replace
them with new plants? And even if they are able to recover, are they now

too
far behind? I'm assuming it will take them a while just to get back to the
6" height they were at before the frost.
.
Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.

Kenn




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Old 11-05-2004, 01:02 AM
Peter
 
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Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

On Mon, 10 May 2004 15:12:55 +0000, kc wrote:

Hello All

My tomato plants were about 6" inches tall when about 10 days ago a frost
killed all their foliage down to the ground. I was ready to purchase new
plants, but noticed that the base of the frost-bitten plants are sending up
new foliage.

Will these plants recover enough to bear fruit, or should I just replace
them with new plants? And even if they are able to recover, are they now too
far behind? I'm assuming it will take them a while just to get back to the
6" height they were at before the frost.
.
Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.

Kenn


Tomatoes are not frost tolerant plants. Replant.

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Old 11-05-2004, 06:03 AM
B & J
 
Posts: n/a
Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

"kc" wrote in message
...
Hello All

My tomato plants were about 6" inches tall when about 10 days ago a frost
killed all their foliage down to the ground. I was ready to purchase new
plants, but noticed that the base of the frost-bitten plants are sending

up
new foliage.

Will these plants recover enough to bear fruit, or should I just replace
them with new plants? And even if they are able to recover, are they now

too
far behind? I'm assuming it will take them a while just to get back to the
6" height they were at before the frost.
.
Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.

Kenn

When you push the limit on the average last frost date by early planting, it
pays to enclose your tomato cages with 3 mm clear plastic taped together
with duct tape, leaving the top and bottom open. Leave some extra plastic on
the top of the cage, so that the top can be closed when frost or a cold
spell is predicted. I usually push the last frost free date by at least two
weeks doing this. As an added bonus the plastic works in much the same order
as a greenhouse and almost doubles growth rate.

As for the frozen plants, the ones regrowing would probably survive and
produce tomatoes but would be later. It would be logical to purchase new
plants and replace the frozen plants.

John


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Old 11-05-2004, 02:02 PM
louise m
 
Posts: n/a
Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

Peter wrote in message .. .
On Mon, 10 May 2004 15:12:55 +0000, kc wrote:

Hello All

My tomato plants were about 6" inches tall when about 10 days ago a frost
killed all their foliage down to the ground. I was ready to purchase new
plants, but noticed that the base of the frost-bitten plants are sending up
new foliage.

Will these plants recover enough to bear fruit, or should I just replace
them with new plants? And even if they are able to recover, are they now too
far behind? I'm assuming it will take them a while just to get back to the
6" height they were at before the frost.
.
Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.

Kenn


Tomatoes are not frost tolerant plants. Replant.

I agree cut your loses and replant


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Old 11-05-2004, 02:47 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2004
Location: criccieth, north wales
Posts: 3
Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

Quote:
Originally posted by kc
Hello All

My tomato plants were about 6" inches tall when about 10 days ago a frost
killed all their foliage down to the ground. I was ready to purchase new
plants, but noticed that the base of the frost-bitten plants are sending up
new foliage.

Will these plants recover enough to bear fruit, or should I just replace
them with new plants? And even if they are able to recover, are they now too
far behind? I'm assuming it will take them a while just to get back to the
6" height they were at before the frost.
..
Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.
Tomato plants can suffer from a physiological disease - they will look fine, but refuse to grow even with perfect conditions - this can happen with just below average temperatures - say below 12degrees C therefore any low temps./frost - get rid and start again, they will not be worth the bother.
WilliamElfyn

Kenn
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Old 11-05-2004, 06:09 PM
kc
 
Posts: n/a
Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

Thanks to all of you for the advice. I will replant based on your
recommendations. I had planned on replanting in the first place, but was
surprised to see the plants still growing, hence my question.

Also, B & J, thanks for the "pushing the season" tip. I will try that next
year.

Kenn



"B & J" wrote in message
...
"kc" wrote in message
...
Hello All

My tomato plants were about 6" inches tall when about 10 days ago a

frost
killed all their foliage down to the ground. I was ready to purchase new
plants, but noticed that the base of the frost-bitten plants are sending

up
new foliage.

Will these plants recover enough to bear fruit, or should I just replace
them with new plants? And even if they are able to recover, are they now

too
far behind? I'm assuming it will take them a while just to get back to

the
6" height they were at before the frost.
.
Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.

Kenn

When you push the limit on the average last frost date by early planting,

it
pays to enclose your tomato cages with 3 mm clear plastic taped together
with duct tape, leaving the top and bottom open. Leave some extra plastic

on
the top of the cage, so that the top can be closed when frost or a cold
spell is predicted. I usually push the last frost free date by at least

two
weeks doing this. As an added bonus the plastic works in much the same

order
as a greenhouse and almost doubles growth rate.

As for the frozen plants, the ones regrowing would probably survive and
produce tomatoes but would be later. It would be logical to purchase new
plants and replace the frozen plants.

John




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Old 11-05-2004, 09:04 PM
Bud
 
Posts: n/a
Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

kc wrote:

Thanks to all of you for the advice. I will replant based on your
recommendations. I had planned on replanting in the first place, but was
surprised to see the plants still growing, hence my question.

Also, B & J, thanks for the "pushing the season" tip. I will try that next
year.

Kenn


Depends on where you live for replanting and how long they have been in the
ground. If it were here, Zone 6, I'd leave them in if they had been there
for more than two weeks. To help them along, there is always the plastic
gallon jug of milk with the bottom cut out and placed on top of the plant
to increase temperature of air and soil around the plant. You can screw on
the top if it gets cool at night to keep in some heat.

As far as the plastic around the cage, that is a good idea for the next
stage after they outgrow the jug. I use clip on clothes pins which is
easier than fighting tape to hold plastic in place.
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Old 11-05-2004, 10:02 PM
Beecrofter
 
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Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

"kc" wrote in message ...
Hello All

My tomato plants were about 6" inches tall when about 10 days ago a frost
killed all their foliage down to the ground. I was ready to purchase new
plants, but noticed that the base of the frost-bitten plants are sending up
new foliage.

Will these plants recover enough to bear fruit, or should I just replace
them with new plants? And even if they are able to recover, are they now too
far behind? I'm assuming it will take them a while just to get back to the
6" height they were at before the frost.
.
Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.

Kenn


Cover em at night with 5 gallon joint compound buckets and a rock if
you think it's gonna be below about 45F
If you are still getting frosts and your season is real short you
might want to add a few new plants.
Remember to take the buckets off in the morning so they don't cook.
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Old 12-05-2004, 05:05 AM
B & J
 
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Default Does Frost Damage Kill Tomato Plants?

"Bud" wrote in message
...
kc wrote:

Thanks to all of you for the advice. I will replant based on your
recommendations. I had planned on replanting in the first place, but was
surprised to see the plants still growing, hence my question.

Also, B & J, thanks for the "pushing the season" tip. I will try that

next
year.

Kenn


Depends on where you live for replanting and how long they have been in

the
ground. If it were here, Zone 6, I'd leave them in if they had been there
for more than two weeks. To help them along, there is always the plastic
gallon jug of milk with the bottom cut out and placed on top of the plant
to increase temperature of air and soil around the plant. You can screw on
the top if it gets cool at night to keep in some heat.

As far as the plastic around the cage, that is a good idea for the next
stage after they outgrow the jug. I use clip on clothes pins which is
easier than fighting tape to hold plastic in place.


Doing the whole process when you plant initially saves time later. I usually
plant about eight 4" - 5" plants, which I started about a month earlier. I
have an equal number of 25" in diameter concrete reinforcing wire cages,
which I've earlier wrapped with the plastic and secured with four strips of
duct tape. After adding gypsum, compost, and a sprinkling of 13-13-13 to the
soil, I mix it together with my Mantis. I dig eight spaced holes in two 4' x
12' raised bed, two in the front and two in the rear. I add a tbsp. of epsom
salts to the bottom of each hole and work it in. I then put in the plants,
water them in, and put down a straw mulch around each plant. I then drive in
two metal posts that fit inside the cages to keep them from blowing over in
a wind. I then place soaker hoses around the beds, cover them with mulch,
both straw and shredded oak leaves, and place the cage over the stakes and
tomatoes. I leave the plastic around the cages until the plants are 2/3 to
3/4 of the way to the top of the cage or the weather becomes hot. That keeps
the plants inside the cage. About every two to three weeks, I pour some
balanced soluble fertilizer around the roots. The tomato yield is fantastic.

I guess the sincerest form of flattery came this spring when a gardening
neighbor followed exactly the same procedure when he put in his tomatoes,
which I had started.

John





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Old 11-03-2011, 10:07 PM
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2011
Posts: 5
Default

Replanting depends on how long you live that they have in the ground. If you are here, 6 areas, I want to leave them, if they already have more than two weeks. To help them get along, there is always the bottom of plastic gallon milk jug cut out, placed on the top of the plant to increase air and soil temperature around the plants.
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