Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 07-07-2004, 07:02 PM
Pete Stephenson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

Greetings all,

I'm relatively new to this group, and have a few questions that I think
you all might be able to answer.

I'm attempting to water a fairly large amount of lawn. I have three
spiked impact sprinklers (the ones that make the "ticking" noise) that
can throw water about 80 feet and an ample amount of hose.

I'm wondering what the optimal way to deploy these sprinkers are, and
how much watering I should be doing in order to properly water the grass
that is here. There are sufficient faucets on the exterior of the
buildings and I have sufficient hoses to move the sprinklers to any
position necessary (corners of the lawn, center, edges, etc.).

Water pressure is pretty good, so using two sprinklers daisy-chained
together is acceptable, but three is not effective. I also have a small
square "It gets the corners!" sprinkler to fill in the areas not reached
by the impact sprinklers.

A crude ASCII map of the area is as follows:

_______________________________
| |
| |
| |
| _____________ |
|--------| |--------|
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|-40ft-|Building #1 |--------|
| | | ^ |
| | | 100ft |
| | | v |
|--------| |--------|
| |____________| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| _____________ |
|--------| |--------|
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|--------|Building #2 |--------|
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|--------| |--------|
| |____________| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
_______________________________|

It's not entirely to scale. Each plot of grass is about 40 feet wide,
but 100 feet long. It's too much to be covered by a single sprinkler.
Two slightly-overlapping sprinklers work fairly well, and leave only a
few "dead spots".

Given that I'm in Washington State, and have no idea what species of
grass (it's standard army issue grass) is here, and given that water
puddles up after about an hour of watering, what would be the most
efficient way of deploying the sprinklers (with the least amount of
movement and re-adjustment), and how long should I water each particular
area, and how long should I wait before re-watering?

Sorry for the large amount of vagueness in this question...I'm not
terribly familiar with the types of grass that the army uses in
Washington State. Needless to say, I'm trying to keep the lawns as green
as possible with the least amount of effort (gardening is not my primary
job, but I try to do what I can).

Many thanks!

--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com

  #2   Report Post  
Old 07-07-2004, 09:02 PM
Matt
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

I recently had the same problem, as I just had my large yard hydroseeded. I
only have two spigots on the exterior of my house. There is sufficient
pressure to run two impulse sprinklers off of each spigot, as long as the
sprinklers aren't the extra large models. The problem is that these
sprinklers advertise a coverage of 80' diameter and put down 1/4" of water
in 3 hours. But in the real world, that would have been with absolutely no
breeze and a single sprinkler on each spigot. When dasychaining them, the
coverage was reduced, any blowing breezes also reduced the effective
coverage. What I did was to get a couple of 2-way splitter manifolds, and
installed one on each spigot. This gave me two outlets at each spigot. I
then put an electronic timer on each output, 4 in total. I then used the
largest impulse sprinkler I could find. It advertised a coverage of 108'
diameter and put out 1/4" in 2 hours, roughly 50% more water than the
smaller impulse sprinklers. This way I could set each timer so that only
one of the sprinklers from each spigot was operating at the same time. That
way each sprinkler would get full pressure and cover a much larger area, and
quicker too. I used digital electronic timers that run as long or as short
as I like up to 4 times each day. This way, I could water a large portion
of the property while I was away or at work, then I just had to do a few
sprinkler moves to get any missed areas.
good luck,
Matt in MI

"Pete Stephenson" wrote in message
news
Greetings all,

I'm relatively new to this group, and have a few questions that I think
you all might be able to answer.

I'm attempting to water a fairly large amount of lawn. I have three
spiked impact sprinklers (the ones that make the "ticking" noise) that
can throw water about 80 feet and an ample amount of hose.

I'm wondering what the optimal way to deploy these sprinkers are, and
how much watering I should be doing in order to properly water the grass
that is here. There are sufficient faucets on the exterior of the
buildings and I have sufficient hoses to move the sprinklers to any
position necessary (corners of the lawn, center, edges, etc.).

Water pressure is pretty good, so using two sprinklers daisy-chained
together is acceptable, but three is not effective. I also have a small
square "It gets the corners!" sprinkler to fill in the areas not reached
by the impact sprinklers.

A crude ASCII map of the area is as follows:

_______________________________
| |
| |
| |
| _____________ |
|--------| |--------|
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|-40ft-|Building #1 |--------|
| | | ^ |
| | | 100ft |
| | | v |
|--------| |--------|
| |____________| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| _____________ |
|--------| |--------|
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|--------|Building #2 |--------|
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|--------| |--------|
| |____________| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
_______________________________|

It's not entirely to scale. Each plot of grass is about 40 feet wide,
but 100 feet long. It's too much to be covered by a single sprinkler.
Two slightly-overlapping sprinklers work fairly well, and leave only a
few "dead spots".

Given that I'm in Washington State, and have no idea what species of
grass (it's standard army issue grass) is here, and given that water
puddles up after about an hour of watering, what would be the most
efficient way of deploying the sprinklers (with the least amount of
movement and re-adjustment), and how long should I water each particular
area, and how long should I wait before re-watering?

Sorry for the large amount of vagueness in this question...I'm not
terribly familiar with the types of grass that the army uses in
Washington State. Needless to say, I'm trying to keep the lawns as green
as possible with the least amount of effort (gardening is not my primary
job, but I try to do what I can).

Many thanks!

--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com


  #3   Report Post  
Old 08-07-2004, 12:03 AM
Roy
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

I know some of us don;t have much of a choice but today I managed to
tear up wuite a bit of my nice new growing grass from a damned
in=mpacked type sprinkler, one of those with the spike you stick down
in the ground. What happens is the soil loosens up around the spike
and it starts to wobble and in the process the hole gets larger and
larger each time the sprinker rotates around and eventually it flips
out of the hole and lays on its side washing away the dirt, seed
etc..I would suggest driving a pipe or tube in the ground of a
sufficient size so the spike will fit in this tube instead of the
ground. Being elevated also help make a better dispersal of the water
as well. I normlly used piece of 1" conduit (EMT Thinwall type) drove
into the ground for mounting the sprinkers in but today had to change
a section and figured I would just drive it in the ground for
now............but it bit me in the butt. Of course various soils
willact different and my soils are sandy with some loam and wash very
easy, but then again most soils will with water pressure anyhow. Just
something to be aware of with those spike in the ground impact
sprinklers.
Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com
Opinions expressed are those of my wifes,
I had no input whatsoever.
Remove "nospam" from email addy.
  #4   Report Post  
Old 08-07-2004, 03:02 AM
Pete Stephenson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

In article ,
"Matt" wrote:

I recently had the same problem, as I just had my large yard hydroseeded. I
only have two spigots on the exterior of my house. There is sufficient
pressure to run two impulse sprinklers off of each spigot, as long as the
sprinklers aren't the extra large models. The problem is that these
sprinklers advertise a coverage of 80' diameter and put down 1/4" of water
in 3 hours. But in the real world, that would have been with absolutely no
breeze and a single sprinkler on each spigot. When dasychaining them, the
coverage was reduced, any blowing breezes also reduced the effective
coverage. What I did was to get a couple of 2-way splitter manifolds, and
installed one on each spigot. This gave me two outlets at each spigot. I
then put an electronic timer on each output, 4 in total. I then used the
largest impulse sprinkler I could find. It advertised a coverage of 108'
diameter and put out 1/4" in 2 hours, roughly 50% more water than the
smaller impulse sprinklers. This way I could set each timer so that only
one of the sprinklers from each spigot was operating at the same time. That
way each sprinkler would get full pressure and cover a much larger area, and
quicker too. I used digital electronic timers that run as long or as short
as I like up to 4 times each day. This way, I could water a large portion
of the property while I was away or at work, then I just had to do a few
sprinkler moves to get any missed areas.


Hmm...interesting idea. I'd do that at home, but I'm afraid that in the
army barracks we're in, expensive things like electronic timers and
extremely useful things like Y splitters are frequently "tactically
reacquired" by others.

Any other ideas?

--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com
  #5   Report Post  
Old 08-07-2004, 03:02 PM
Matt
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

This isn't a problem on the larger impulse sprinklers that I have, they have
three stakes, can't rotate.
How you position the hose can also help to keep the single spike sprinklers
from rotating.
good luck,
Matt in MI


"Roy" wrote in message
...
I know some of us don;t have much of a choice but today I managed to
tear up wuite a bit of my nice new growing grass from a damned
in=mpacked type sprinkler, one of those with the spike you stick down
in the ground. What happens is the soil loosens up around the spike
and it starts to wobble and in the process the hole gets larger and
larger each time the sprinker rotates around and eventually it flips
out of the hole and lays on its side washing away the dirt, seed
etc..I would suggest driving a pipe or tube in the ground of a
sufficient size so the spike will fit in this tube instead of the
ground. Being elevated also help make a better dispersal of the water
as well. I normlly used piece of 1" conduit (EMT Thinwall type) drove
into the ground for mounting the sprinkers in but today had to change
a section and figured I would just drive it in the ground for
now............but it bit me in the butt. Of course various soils
willact different and my soils are sandy with some loam and wash very
easy, but then again most soils will with water pressure anyhow. Just
something to be aware of with those spike in the ground impact
sprinklers.
Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com
Opinions expressed are those of my wifes,
I had no input whatsoever.
Remove "nospam" from email addy.





  #6   Report Post  
Old 08-07-2004, 04:02 PM
Pam - gardengal
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?


"Pete Stephenson" wrote in message
news


Sorry for the large amount of vagueness in this question...I'm not
terribly familiar with the types of grass that the army uses in
Washington State. Needless to say, I'm trying to keep the lawns as green
as possible with the least amount of effort (gardening is not my primary
job, but I try to do what I can).

Many thanks!


Pete, most lawn grasses in the PNW are a blend of cool season grasses that
do best in our climate. 'Cool season' is a key - these are grasses that want
to go dormant during the heat of summer. Water is an extremely valuable (and
expensive) resource here in WA state and I would encourage you to allow the
lawns to go dormant if at all possible - attempting to maintain a large
expanse of lush green lawn through the heat and dryness of our summers is
often an exercise in futility, not to mention a huge drain on one's
pocketbook, paying premium rates for water. The lawn will green up rapidly
once cooler temps and fall rains resume.

If maintaining the greenness is essential, the lawn will need one inch of
water per week, preferably delivered in one or two significant waterings
rather than daily small doses. If puddling occurs, it is an indication you
need to aerate the lawn so that the water will percolate well down into the
root zone. And don't mow too short - too tight a cut exposes roots to too
much sun and further dries out the lawn, as well as allowing the germination
of weeds.

pam - gardengal
WA state



--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com



  #7   Report Post  
Old 08-07-2004, 05:02 PM
HA HA Budys Here
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

From: "Pam - gardengal"



"Pete Stephenson" wrote in message
news


Sorry for the large amount of vagueness in this question...I'm not
terribly familiar with the types of grass that the army uses in
Washington State. Needless to say, I'm trying to keep the lawns as green
as possible with the least amount of effort (gardening is not my primary
job, but I try to do what I can).

Many thanks!


Pete, most lawn grasses in the PNW are a blend of cool season grasses that
do best in our climate. 'Cool season' is a key - these are grasses that want
to go dormant during the heat of summer. Water is an extremely valuable (and
expensive) resource here in WA state and I would encourage you to allow the
lawns to go dormant if at all possible - attempting to maintain a large
expanse of lush green lawn through the heat and dryness of our summers is
often an exercise in futility, not to mention a huge drain on one's
pocketbook, paying premium rates for water. The lawn will green up rapidly
once cooler temps and fall rains resume.

If maintaining the greenness is essential, the lawn will need one inch of
water per week, preferably delivered in one or two significant waterings
rather than daily small doses. If puddling occurs, it is an indication you
need to aerate the lawn so that the water will percolate well down into the
root zone. And don't mow too short - too tight a cut exposes roots to too
much sun and further dries out the lawn, as well as allowing the germination
of weeds.

pam - gardengal
WA state



--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com


Before I installed an in-ground system, I used the in-ground type sprinkler
heads on standard, above-ground style spiked bases with standard hose threads.
I found that underground sprinkler heads designed for large areas were better
made, even though they're not as easy to adjust.

Also - you can run 3 or 4 sprinkler heads from 1 faucet if your hoses are
tapped off the faucet individually, or are 3/4" instead of cheap-o 1/2" garden
hose.

  #8   Report Post  
Old 08-07-2004, 10:02 PM
Pete Stephenson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

In article [email protected]_s52,
"Pam - gardengal" wrote:

Pete, most lawn grasses in the PNW are a blend of cool season grasses that
do best in our climate. 'Cool season' is a key - these are grasses that want
to go dormant during the heat of summer. Water is an extremely valuable (and
expensive) resource here in WA state and I would encourage you to allow the
lawns to go dormant if at all possible - attempting to maintain a large
expanse of lush green lawn through the heat and dryness of our summers is
often an exercise in futility, not to mention a huge drain on one's
pocketbook, paying premium rates for water. The lawn will green up rapidly
once cooler temps and fall rains resume.


Hmm...sounds good.

If maintaining the greenness is essential, the lawn will need one inch of
water per week, preferably delivered in one or two significant waterings
rather than daily small doses. If puddling occurs, it is an indication you
need to aerate the lawn so that the water will percolate well down into the
root zone. And don't mow too short - too tight a cut exposes roots to too
much sun and further dries out the lawn, as well as allowing the germination
of weeds.


Alas, as I mentioned, I'm in the army...and logic and reason (as well as
efficiency) have no bearing whatsoever. I have been instructed to
maintain this lawn, and doggone it, I will.

Is there any way to calculate the approximate watering time necessary to
lay down an inch of water per week? For instance, would two hours with a
standard impact sprinkler (40ft radius) with good water pressure put
down an inch of water? I could go out there and put some cans down to
measure, but I'm just looking for an approximate value. I have some
faucet timers, so I don't go overboard and leave the lawns soaked and
waste a ton of water if I forget to turn off the faucets.

I'm just trying to get this done as best I can in the most efficient
manner possible. That is proving to be rather difficult, as I'm not a
gardening expert.

pam - gardengal
WA state


--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com
  #9   Report Post  
Old 08-07-2004, 10:02 PM
Matt
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?


"Pete Stephenson" wrote in message
news
In article [email protected]_s52,
"Pam - gardengal" wrote:

Pete, most lawn grasses in the PNW are a blend of cool season grasses

that
do best in our climate. 'Cool season' is a key - these are grasses that

want
to go dormant during the heat of summer. Water is an extremely valuable

(and
expensive) resource here in WA state and I would encourage you to allow

the
lawns to go dormant if at all possible - attempting to maintain a large
expanse of lush green lawn through the heat and dryness of our summers

is
often an exercise in futility, not to mention a huge drain on one's
pocketbook, paying premium rates for water. The lawn will green up

rapidly
once cooler temps and fall rains resume.


Hmm...sounds good.

If maintaining the greenness is essential, the lawn will need one inch

of
water per week, preferably delivered in one or two significant waterings
rather than daily small doses. If puddling occurs, it is an indication

you
need to aerate the lawn so that the water will percolate well down into

the
root zone. And don't mow too short - too tight a cut exposes roots to

too
much sun and further dries out the lawn, as well as allowing the

germination
of weeds.


Alas, as I mentioned, I'm in the army...and logic and reason (as well as
efficiency) have no bearing whatsoever. I have been instructed to
maintain this lawn, and doggone it, I will.

Is there any way to calculate the approximate watering time necessary to
lay down an inch of water per week? For instance, would two hours with a
standard impact sprinkler (40ft radius) with good water pressure put
down an inch of water? I could go out there and put some cans down to
measure, but I'm just looking for an approximate value. I have some
faucet timers, so I don't go overboard and leave the lawns soaked and
waste a ton of water if I forget to turn off the faucets.

No, not without consulting the manufacturer or the packaging the sprinklers
came in.
I recently purchased a couple impulse sprinklers from Lowes.
I bought a gilmour sprinkler that advertised 5800 sq.ft coverage (80' diam)
and puts down 1/4" of water in 3 hours. I also bought one of their large
models that covers 8500 sq.ft (100' diam.) and puts down 1/4" of water in 2
hours.
FYI, lawns need aprox 1 inch of water a week to keep from going dormant
during the warm dry season.
good luck,

I'm just trying to get this done as best I can in the most efficient
manner possible. That is proving to be rather difficult, as I'm not a
gardening expert.

pam - gardengal
WA state


--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com



  #10   Report Post  
Old 09-07-2004, 09:02 AM
Pete Stephenson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

In article ,
"Matt" wrote:

I bought a gilmour sprinkler that advertised 5800 sq.ft coverage (80'
diam) and puts down 1/4" of water in 3 hours.


Hmm...that's it? Only 1/4" of water in 3 hours? That seems to be very,
very little. I'm getting large puddles of standing water after only two
hours of watering.

The sprinklers I'm using right now are Orbit/Sunmate Zinc Impact
Sprinkler with Zinc Spike Base (http://tinyurl.com/2kcch)


My timers can only be set to 2 hours at a time. I'm rotating the
sprinklers around a bit to get different coverage area (and so the
water in one area can percolate a bit). There's a large amount of
overlap, but my main concern is maximum area wetness, rather than a
specific amount of water in a particular area.

Once I get coverage, then I can refine positions and timing to ensure
that the areas are getting the watering they're needing. I've also seen
gear-moved, water-driven sprinklers (http://tinyurl.com/yqxme) that
spray in circular patterns like impact sprinklers, but with no noise
and seem to be less succeptible to spike-bending (I just bent a spike
today). It's either that, or some impact sprinklers with some
heavy-duty triple-spiked bases that can soak 100'-wide areas. Those
seem to be a better investment, considering the type of soil we have
here (hard and rocky). If most impact sprinklers only put out 1/4" of
water per 3 hours, that's 12 hours of watering in order to lay down an
inch of water.

It's rather odd, as near the command-staff buildings, they have lush,
green grass growing year-round, and they don't seem to have in-ground
sprinklers...and you never see the sprinklers going, so they're not
running them for 12 hours at a time. I wonder what's going on.

Are there any recommended sprinkler brands for quality and durability?
The Orbit/Sunmate ones seem rather nice, but the zinc spike of one of
them bent 45 today, rendering it useless. I'm looking for something
heavy-duty with a beefy base (a sled-type base that won't tip over is
acceptable, but all the ones I've seen have tipped easily), preferably a
metal impact head (plastic is ok, but only if it's durable...non-impact
continuious stream gear-moved water-powered heads like the one I linked
to above are also acceptable, if people have more information on them),
and the ability to be chained in series (though this isn't of utmost
importance, it'd still be convienient). Oh, and high water volume and
long-range stream. I must admit that I'm relatively new to lawn care,
and if I'm going to invest (even if less than a hundred dollars) in
sprinklers and other materials, I might as well get the good stuff.

Cheers!

--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com


  #11   Report Post  
Old 09-07-2004, 02:02 PM
Matt
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?


"Pete Stephenson" wrote in message
news
In article ,
"Matt" wrote:

I bought a gilmour sprinkler that advertised 5800 sq.ft coverage (80'
diam) and puts down 1/4" of water in 3 hours.


Hmm...that's it? Only 1/4" of water in 3 hours? That seems to be very,
very little. I'm getting large puddles of standing water after only two
hours of watering.

The sprinklers I'm using right now are Orbit/Sunmate Zinc Impact
Sprinkler with Zinc Spike Base (http://tinyurl.com/2kcch)


My timers can only be set to 2 hours at a time. I'm rotating the
sprinklers around a bit to get different coverage area (and so the
water in one area can percolate a bit). There's a large amount of
overlap, but my main concern is maximum area wetness, rather than a
specific amount of water in a particular area.

Once I get coverage, then I can refine positions and timing to ensure
that the areas are getting the watering they're needing. I've also seen
gear-moved, water-driven sprinklers (http://tinyurl.com/yqxme) that
spray in circular patterns like impact sprinklers, but with no noise
and seem to be less succeptible to spike-bending (I just bent a spike
today). It's either that, or some impact sprinklers with some
heavy-duty triple-spiked bases that can soak 100'-wide areas. Those
seem to be a better investment, considering the type of soil we have
here (hard and rocky). If most impact sprinklers only put out 1/4" of
water per 3 hours, that's 12 hours of watering in order to lay down an
inch of water.


I have the extra large, triple-spike based sprinklers. it advertises to put
down 1/4" in 2 hours. (50% more than the 80'diam. sprinklers) They cost
around $25-$30 each at Lowes.
Here is an url to this sprinkler
http://www.gilmour.com/Watering_Hose...geCoverage.asp
Running it two times a week for 4 hours will get you your 1" of water a
week. My soil has a lot of clay in it, so I can't run this sprinkler any
longer than about 30 mins at a time before I get major puddling. I have
timers set that run the sprinkler 4 times a day for 30 mins each time. I am
still trying to get my lawn established, so I am watering alot right now.
Once it is established, I will back off the timers to running twice a day
for 30 mins.

It wouldn't hurt to buy a rain guage and place it in the lawn. That way you
can keep track of exactly how much water the grass is getting.
Matt


It's rather odd, as near the command-staff buildings, they have lush,
green grass growing year-round, and they don't seem to have in-ground
sprinklers...and you never see the sprinklers going, so they're not
running them for 12 hours at a time. I wonder what's going on.

Are there any recommended sprinkler brands for quality and durability?
The Orbit/Sunmate ones seem rather nice, but the zinc spike of one of
them bent 45 today, rendering it useless. I'm looking for something
heavy-duty with a beefy base (a sled-type base that won't tip over is
acceptable, but all the ones I've seen have tipped easily), preferably a
metal impact head (plastic is ok, but only if it's durable...non-impact
continuious stream gear-moved water-powered heads like the one I linked
to above are also acceptable, if people have more information on them),
and the ability to be chained in series (though this isn't of utmost
importance, it'd still be convienient). Oh, and high water volume and
long-range stream. I must admit that I'm relatively new to lawn care,
and if I'm going to invest (even if less than a hundred dollars) in
sprinklers and other materials, I might as well get the good stuff.

Cheers!

--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com



  #12   Report Post  
Old 09-07-2004, 08:02 PM
Pete Stephenson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

In article ,
"Matt" wrote:

I have the extra large, triple-spike based sprinklers. it advertises to put
down 1/4" in 2 hours. (50% more than the 80'diam. sprinklers) They cost
around $25-$30 each at Lowes.
Here is an url to this sprinkler
http://www.gilmour.com/Watering_Hose...geCoverage.asp
Running it two times a week for 4 hours will get you your 1" of water a
week. My soil has a lot of clay in it, so I can't run this sprinkler any
longer than about 30 mins at a time before I get major puddling. I have
timers set that run the sprinkler 4 times a day for 30 mins each time. I am
still trying to get my lawn established, so I am watering alot right now.
Once it is established, I will back off the timers to running twice a day
for 30 mins.


Hmm. Excellent. They sell those precise sprinklers right here where I'm
at. I just wanted to double-check to make sure they were actually decent
sprinklers before investing in them.

Thanks!

It wouldn't hurt to buy a rain guage and place it in the lawn. That way you
can keep track of exactly how much water the grass is getting.


Indeed.

--
Pete Stephenson
HeyPete.com
  #13   Report Post  
Old 09-07-2004, 08:02 PM
Tyler Hopper
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?


"Matt" wrote in message
...


I have the extra large, triple-spike based sprinklers. it advertises to put
down 1/4" in 2 hours. (50% more than the 80'diam. sprinklers) They cost
around $25-$30 each at Lowes.
Here is an url to this sprinkler
http://www.gilmour.com/Watering_Hose...geCoverage.asp
Running it two times a week for 4 hours will get you your 1" of water a
week. My soil has a lot of clay in it, so I can't run this sprinkler any
longer than about 30 mins at a time before I get major puddling. I have
timers set that run the sprinkler 4 times a day for 30 mins each time. I am
still trying to get my lawn established, so I am watering alot right now.
Once it is established, I will back off the timers to running twice a day
for 30 mins.


I have these exact issues. Soil is heavy clay and after only 15 min. the water
is running into the street. I have an inground system with a decent Hunter
timer. I set it to run 5 - 15 min per zone. After it finishes the 7th zone the
water has soaked in enough to start at zone 1 again.


It wouldn't hurt to buy a rain guage and place it in the lawn. That way you
can keep track of exactly how much water the grass is getting.
Matt


My experience has been that the local water authority will give you rain gauges.


Tyler


  #14   Report Post  
Old 03-08-2019, 04:14 AM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2019
Posts: 3
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

replying to Roy, Visitor200 wrote:
Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com

Sorry to report, Roy, but your website is no longer working.

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/garden...ers-21715-.htm


  #15   Report Post  
Old 03-08-2019, 03:14 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2019
Posts: 3
Default Lawn watering with impact sprinklers?

replying to Pam - gardengal, Visitor200 wrote:
the lawn will need one inch of water per week, preferably delivered in one or

two significant waterings rather than daily small doses.
Pam, if someone is using a tripod impact sprinkler, with a radius of up to 90
feet . . . b y some accounts it takes 3 hours to get 1/4 of an inch of water.
Would that mean to run the sprinkler 4 times a week for 3 hours to get one
inch? If so, then for a large lawn (mine is 1 acre matured grass, plus
another 1 acre of matured mowed field grass) - that may require 12 hours of
watering each week for several large areas. (by the way, we have our own well
at the base of Rocky Mountains where water is plentiful)

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/garden...ers-21715-.htm




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gear driven sprinkler versus impact sprinkler MiamiCuse Lawns 2 11-11-2008 02:40 AM
GLOBAL WARMING'S IMPACT ON YOUR GARDEN. Bill[_13_] Gardening 10 02-04-2008 12:17 PM
Impact of glasshouses/polytunnels on the environment mostlyme Gardening 0 29-10-2005 12:54 PM
Q: Impact on soil (charcoal ashes and mothball) JKC Texas 1 22-08-2005 03:44 AM
Biggest Study of GMO Finds Impact on Birds, Bees Play4abuck Gardening 0 21-03-2005 07:41 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:17 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017