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fred 24-02-2005 11:47 AM

cat/dog repellents
 
I have a big problem with cats fowling on my garden. I have been told
to use pepper, but this only lasts while we have dry weather. This
time of year is not practical, does anybody have any ideas that work
in the wet or wintery weather.

Phisherman 24-02-2005 03:29 PM

On 24 Feb 2005 03:47:19 -0800, (fred)
wrote:

I have a big problem with cats fowling on my garden. I have been told
to use pepper, but this only lasts while we have dry weather. This
time of year is not practical, does anybody have any ideas that work
in the wet or wintery weather.


Electric fences work exceptionally well in wet weather! Cats like to
poop in loose soil, so a mulch discourages that. Also, try thorny
branches, sweetgum balls, motion detection sprinklers, etc.

Timothy 24-02-2005 04:40 PM

On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 15:29:38 +0000, Phisherman wrote:

On 24 Feb 2005 03:47:19 -0800, (fred) wrote:

I have a big problem with cats fowling on my garden. I have been told to
use pepper, but this only lasts while we have dry weather. This time of
year is not practical, does anybody have any ideas that work in the wet
or wintery weather.


Electric fences work exceptionally well in wet weather! Cats like to
poop in loose soil, so a mulch discourages that. Also, try thorny
branches, sweetgum balls, motion detection sprinklers, etc.


A client of mine used mothballs to repel cat from her flowerbeds. She
took old sourcream containers with holes cut in the sides, filled with
mothballs. This way they wouldn't get wet and clean-up, removal was made
easy. Personally I thought she was full of it but week after week, the
cats stayed away... and used the neighbor's flowerbed instead. 80) It
seems that cats can smell very well and the smell of mothballs is just way
too much for them to deal with. It might be worth a try, but your mileage
my vary.
Good luck.

--
Yard Works Gardening Co.
http://www.ywgc.com

Bill R 24-02-2005 04:51 PM

Timothy wrote:

A client of mine used mothballs to repel cat from her flowerbeds. She
took old sourcream containers with holes cut in the sides, filled with
mothballs. This way they wouldn't get wet and clean-up, removal was made
easy. Personally I thought she was full of it but week after week, the
cats stayed away... and used the neighbor's flowerbed instead. 80) It
seems that cats can smell very well and the smell of mothballs is just way
too much for them to deal with. It might be worth a try, but your mileage
my vary.
Good luck.


I used to use mothballs but I found that unless you used a
lot of them it was a hit and miss situation. I started to
use pepper (red pepper works best) and found that it worked
better. Also, just about any hot spice works well but they
are a little more expensive to use.

--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

Digital Camera: HP PhotoSmart 850

For pictures of my garden flowers visit
http://members.iglou.com/brosen

Remove NO_WEEDS_ in e-mail address to reply by e-mail


Grif Nordling 24-02-2005 07:47 PM

(fred) wrote in message . com...
I have a big problem with cats fowling on my garden. I have been told
to use pepper, but this only lasts while we have dry weather. This
time of year is not practical, does anybody have any ideas that work
in the wet or wintery weather.


I had paghat take a dump in my garden two years ago, and no living
things have returned, not even skunks.

[email protected] 25-02-2005 12:58 AM

(Grif Nordling) wrote in
:

(fred) wrote in message
. com...
I have a big problem with cats fowling on my garden. I have been told
to use pepper, but this only lasts while we have dry weather. This
time of year is not practical, does anybody have any ideas that work
in the wet or wintery weather.


I had paghat take a dump in my garden two years ago, and no living
things have returned, not even skunks.


More than likely, it's all you.

raycruzer 25-02-2005 05:47 PM

If you buy a chemical from a pet store to repel pets, make sure you
find out if it can be returned. I tried two different products ...
neither worked!

This was for a stray dog that liked my brick terrace for her daily
duty. Eventually, I had to place a temporary fence around my terrace
until she found a different spot.

I should have tried pepper.

Ray
___________________________________
Talk about weeds: www.ergonica.com


Leon Trollski 26-02-2005 04:26 PM


"fred" wrote in message
om...
I have a big problem with cats fowling on my garden. I have been told
to use pepper, but this only lasts while we have dry weather. This
time of year is not practical, does anybody have any ideas that work
in the wet or wintery weather.


I use bark mulch, and in high traffic areas, sections of rose canes.



paghat 26-02-2005 05:15 PM

In article [email protected], "Leon Trollski"
wrote:

"fred" wrote in message
om...
I have a big problem with cats fowling on my garden. I have been told
to use pepper, but this only lasts while we have dry weather. This
time of year is not practical, does anybody have any ideas that work
in the wet or wintery weather.


I use bark mulch, and in high traffic areas, sections of rose canes.


Rose canes are a good idea but some of them are apt to start growing! The
use of cayane pepper seems to work on cats but it would have to be
purchased by the large bags-full for regular re-application, & it does
fail in the rainy season.

Here's a repost of something I wrote previously on the topic of repelling
cats & dogs:

Pine cones, well-dried rose or blackberry canes, or even just some
interesting looking lengths of tree limbs from late-winter prunings, can
be arranged as a nice-looking mulch to discourage dog squats & cat digs.

ANY thick groundcover would ruin the area for a dog & cat visits, since
what cats like is the fresh dirt with nothing in the way, & what dogs want
is a place with nothing growing tall enough to mush their tush. Getting
the groundcover established might be a trick unless you buy a lot already
well developed to start with. Below are some groundcover possibilities.

Groundcovers that are vengeful would include "crimson pygmy" barberry.
It's brittle if stepped on, but if a dog steps on it, it'll sure be sorry.
And it's slow-growing so if you want it as a ground cover you have to
plant a lot of them figuring they won't grow but two or three inches a
year. It can grow to two feet high, but don't hold your breath. If in the
very long run it does get taller than needed it can be sheered. Other
dwarf barberries are more apt to grow two to three feet a bit more
rapidly, or could be purchased larger in order to plant a hedge dogs
couldn't very well get over, then in the midst of the hedge you could
still have bulbs.

Dwarf Euphorbia Crown of Thorns is a low-maintance groundcover with wicked
spines. There are also many wonderful groundcover euphorbia desert rose
hybrids in splendid cultivar colors. Plus Rosa sp roses often called
"shrub roses" such as R. carolina that stay under two feet tall but four
feet wide, which only take a few to make a great barrier. Some are nearly
thornless but others are thick with thorns. By "groundcover" though this
means they grow thick & cover the whole area they're permitted, at one to
three feet tall, so not little things that cling to the soil, though there
are also vining roses that function nicely as short-short groundcovers
that most people trellis but they don't need to be trellised.

Something thorny that clings more to the ground could include several
types of vining raspberries & blackberries, there are some very small
varieties that unless trellised just creep around flat on the ground.
These can be very decorative, lovely blossoms & fruit for the birds
(probably wouldn't want the fruit for yourself where dogs could still lift
a leg). You do have to care for vining rubra cultivars though, because
otherwise they get too brambly-homely over time. They die back in winter
but can be left as dead stickers until new growth starts, for a year-round
"ha ha! stuck-your-bum!" threat to dogs & cats.

Smilex or Greebriar aka climbing asparagus forms a woody thorny vine
barrier, & is sometimes called "cat briar" because it gets the better of
cats. Not all species of smilex are equally thorny, but most would be very
grim for a dog to squat his tushy onto or cats to scrape their paws.

But really vengeful groundcovers aren't essential; anything you plant
there that doesn't die back & which can be planted close together would
eventually make the area no longer invitingly flat with freshly churned
soil for a squat. Such easy groundcovers as manzanita or cotoneaster or
even an array of dwarf azaleas would keep domestic animals off, &amp even
a short soft groundcover would foil cats (though not dogs) who need
diggable soil.

Poo could also just be trowled to the compost pile & regarded as free soil
enrichment & just stop being so crabby about cats. At last count I'm
visited by four neighbor's cats. It annoys me they get some birds but
their poo is way too trivial to go get ****y about. And yes there are some
zoonotic diseases associated with uncomposted pet poo, but there is an
even better chance of getting tetanus from healthy soil, neither
possibility worthy of too much paranoia.

-paghat the ratgirl
--
Get your Paghat the Ratgirl T-Shirt he
http://www.paghat.com/giftshop.html
"History, I believe, furnishes no example of a priest-ridden
people maintaining a free civil government." -Thomas Jefferson

Doug Kanter 28-02-2005 06:46 PM


"fred" wrote in message
om...
I have a big problem with cats fowling on my garden. I have been told
to use pepper, but this only lasts while we have dry weather. This
time of year is not practical, does anybody have any ideas that work
in the wet or wintery weather.


This works in any weather:
http://www.taurususa.com/products/pr...egory=Revolver

The best approach is to nail the dogs first. Most are larger than cats, and
thus make easier targets for new shooters. And, of course, they're
conveniently stupid, and are more likely to look right at you and drool as
you terminate them. Now, leave the corpses in place for 24 hours as a
warning to the cats, who are generally smart enough to know trouble when
they see it.



sammytheon1 15-05-2019 03:28 PM

We had the same problem, although we know for sure its a cat, we've never actually seen him in action. So we can't tell which neihborhood stray it actually is. What worked for us was orange peels. Apparently they don't like the citrus scent. However its not by any means a one time fix since they seem to do the trick for around a week and a half to weeks at most and then you'll have to eat some more oranges and put the peels down. Some good suggestions here might have to try mothballs in a container it might last longer.


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