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Old 09-02-2003, 05:27 PM
Tanya
 
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Default calcium and acidity question

hello,
(zone 5)
i use vinegar in certain acid requiring plants' water (hibiscus, azalea)
to maintain (or get to) a pH 7... the vinegar / water's pH is ~ 5 or
6...
have heard that certain elements are unAvailable in acidic environments
for ex calcium and wonder whether i should supplement these with calcium
containing fertilizer (even though the soil pH is only minimally acidic
(since i am assuming that the tap water is the calcium source)
thank you!


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Old 10-02-2003, 12:55 AM
Iris Cohen
 
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Default calcium and acidity question

(zone 5)
i use vinegar in certain acid requiring plants' water (hibiscus, azalea) to
maintain (or get to) a pH 7

vinegar is not recommended, as it will decompose in the soil & may produce
compounds which are toxic to plants. I think you would do better to use
Miracid. City tap water in most locations has enough calcium for most plants.
The usual problem is too much.

Iris,
Central NY, Zone 5a, Sunset Zone 40
"If we see light at the end of the tunnel, It's the light of the oncoming
train."
Robert Lowell (1917-1977)
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Old 10-02-2003, 01:25 AM
Tom Jaszewski
 
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Default calcium and acidity question

Xref: news7 rec.gardens:208493

On 10 Feb 2003 00:38:05 GMT, (Iris Cohen) wrote:

I think you would do better to use
Miracid.


First you express concerns about salts then you recommend salts...DOH?




Regards,

tomj
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Old 10-02-2003, 02:25 PM
Beecrofter
 
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Default calcium and acidity question

First off Miracid is a fertilizer not a soil ammendment.

Almost all chemical fertilizers will be acid and the ones for crops
will tell you how much lime per ton of fertilizer you need to apply to
counteract the acidity.

To keep your soil acid your best bet would be to work a little sulfur
into the top inch or so and to keep the lawn lime away from your
plantings.
For faster results you would use aluminum sulfate.

To provide sulfur and nitrogen you could use a fertilizer whose
nitrogen componant came from ammonium sulfate.

As for the calcium concerns in the original post you either learn to
recognize deficiency or you do a soil test.
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Old 11-02-2003, 05:55 PM
Tanya
 
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Default calcium and acidity question

Iris Cohen wrote:

(zone 5)
i use vinegar in certain acid requiring plants' water (hibiscus, azalea) to
maintain (or get to) a pH 7

vinegar is not recommended, as it will decompose in the soil & may produce
compounds which are toxic to plants. I think you would do better to use
Miracid. City tap water in most locations has enough calcium for most plants.
The usual problem is too much.

Iris,
Central NY, Zone 5a, Sunset Zone 40
"If we see light at the end of the tunnel, It's the light of the oncoming
train."
Robert Lowell (1917-1977)


thanks for the reply...
i tested the soil and the mirAcid (which i *have* been using) is doing nothing
for the pH...
sincerely
Tanya




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Old 11-02-2003, 05:55 PM
Tanya
 
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Default calcium and acidity question

Beecrofter wrote:

First off Miracid is a fertilizer not a soil ammendment.

Almost all chemical fertilizers will be acid and the ones for crops
will tell you how much lime per ton of fertilizer you need to apply to
counteract the acidity.

To keep your soil acid your best bet would be to work a little sulfur
into the top inch or so and to keep the lawn lime away from your
plantings.
For faster results you would use aluminum sulfate.

To provide sulfur and nitrogen you could use a fertilizer whose
nitrogen componant came from ammonium sulfate.

As for the calcium concerns in the original post you either learn to
recognize deficiency or you do a soil test.


hi
thank you for replying...
i *do* use mirAcid on some (azaleas) and tested the soil which in all
except for 1 (which i had given sulfur to for ?mites/root problems)) were
neutral to basic (on the test capsules and a pool testing kit)
with the pool kit however, the pH was 6.8 for the sulfurized one...
i don't know how to test for calcium...
thanks again
sincerely
Tanya



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Old 12-02-2003, 12:25 AM
FarmerDill
 
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Default calcium and acidity question

6...
have heard that certain elements are unAvailable in acidic environments
for ex calcium and wonder whether i should supplement these with calcium
containing fertilizer (even though the soil pH is only minimally acidic
(since i am assuming that the tap water is the calcium source)
thank you!

Soluble calcium salts or hydroxides combine with acids to form insoluble or
less soluble calcium salts, That's why you use gound limestone (calcium
carbonate) to to raise the pH of acid soils or take TUMS (also calcium
carbonate) to raise the pH of your tummy, As long as a soluble calcium salt is
available it is looking fo an acid to neutralize. Fortunately acid loving
plants have low calcium requirements.

dill


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