Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 01-03-2011, 12:46 AM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2011
Posts: 4
Default Strawberry plant weeding

Hi!
We have a small garden (approx. 10' x 20') in our back yard with some
strawberries in it. I'm in Southern California, and right now it's a
combination of weeds, dead grass, and green strawberry plants.
My question is, can I mow that area & not kill the strawberries?
Mowing is the easiest way to clear it out, but keeping those plants
healthy enough to produce fruit is of paramount importance. If it'll
harm them, we'll just have to dig in there & pull weeds.
Thanks in advance.

  #2   Report Post  
Old 01-03-2011, 05:38 AM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,815
Default Strawberry plant weeding

Edward wrote:

Hi!
We have a small garden (approx. 10' x 20') in our back yard with some
strawberries in it. I'm in Southern California, and right now it's a
combination of weeds, dead grass, and green strawberry plants.
My question is, can I mow that area & not kill the strawberries?
Mowing is the easiest way to clear it out, but keeping those plants
healthy enough to produce fruit is of paramount importance. If it'll
harm them, we'll just have to dig in there & pull weeds.
Thanks in advance.


mowing will not kill the strawberries, but it
won't help them either.

the strawberries need those leaves to make
the fruit. you'll reduce or eliminate the crop
by cutting them back.

leaving the weeds in reduces the nutrients
and moisture that the strawberries can get at.
so best to carefully weed around the plants
you wish to encourage fruit from.

a practical approach to rejuvinating the
patch is to pick a few areas where the most
strawberry plants remain and clear out as
many weeds as possible around those plants.
then add some composted manure (not fresh
manure!) and then mulch over that. this
will help keep the weeds down.

the remaining area i would turn under and
then plant a cover crop as soon as conditions
are suitable. adding organic mulch to keep
the weeds down and help build the soil
fertility for future years. the strawberries
will spread into these areas as they grow.

eventually you will want to rotate the
entire patch in sections so you can keep up
with the heavy feeding demands by either
ammending or cover cropping.


songbird
  #3   Report Post  
Old 01-03-2011, 07:32 AM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2011
Posts: 4
Default Strawberry plant weeding


Thanks! It looks like there's no easy way out of hand weeding. I think
I'll let it go for a few weeks though. A series of recent Pacific
storms has resulted in temps down around freezing at night. Maybe that
tall, dead grass surrounding the plants is helping to keep them warm
at night.
Thanks for your advice!
  #4   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2011, 03:14 AM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2011
Posts: 3
Default Strawberry plant weeding

On 3/1/2011 2:32 AM, Edward wrote:

Thanks! It looks like there's no easy way out of hand weeding. I think
I'll let it go for a few weeks though. A series of recent Pacific
storms has resulted in temps down around freezing at night. Maybe that
tall, dead grass surrounding the plants is helping to keep them warm
at night.
Thanks for your advice!

i don't know the variety you have but some time ago I planted 100 Tn
Beauties. They didn't bear the first year. We had to weed them by hand.
Once you get the weeds out it is not difficult to keep them out just
have to keep it up.
We had so many berries, for years, until I went to Nam, that it kept all
of the family rosy fingered.
It was not uncommon to pick three gallons or so per day during the
summer. Of course they were fertilized with chemical.
Unless it is well rotted manure, I don't want to eat ground bearing
berries off it. Don't need any, of a variety, of diseases.
Cut the runners between plants each year. That assures the plants, of
years before bear more. The new plants may not bear until the next season.
You will have several times the starting plants every year afterwards,
The biggest problem we had was snails.
Really good berries draw the critters fast. You'll lose some.
If they are the new shippers or cardboard berries(my term) you probably
won't have too man pests.
There is nothing like GOOD fresh ripe, tangy, sweet, aromatic, berries
that taste like they smell or even better, strawberries and cream, for
breakfast. If you haven't had any you will never buy another shipper,
when you do.
  #5   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2011, 02:38 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2007
Posts: 750
Default Strawberry plant weeding

Edward wrote:
Thanks! It looks like there's no easy way out of hand weeding. I think
I'll let it go for a few weeks though. A series of recent Pacific
storms has resulted in temps down around freezing at night. Maybe that
tall, dead grass surrounding the plants is helping to keep them warm
at night.
Thanks for your advice!


If I were doing it, I'd probably dig up all the strawberry plants, seperate them
from the weeds, add compost, then replant the younger strawberries (those with
shorter "trunks" from root to leaf stalk). Doing it as early in the season as
you can will help.




  #6   Report Post  
Old 03-03-2011, 01:12 AM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2011
Posts: 1
Default Strawberry plant weeding

Good question Edward. Strawberries are delicious, especially grown
fresh!




On Feb 28, 7:46*pm, Edward wrote:
Hi!
We have a small garden (approx. 10' x 20') in our back yard with some
strawberries in it. I'm in Southern California, and right now it's a
combination of weeds, dead grass, and green strawberry plants.
My question is, can I mow that area & not kill the strawberries?
Mowing is the easiest way to clear it out, but keeping those plants
healthy enough to produce fruit is of paramount importance. If it'll
harm them, we'll just have to dig in there & pull weeds.
Thanks in advance.


  #7   Report Post  
Old 03-03-2011, 07:59 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,815
Default Strawberry plant weeding

Edward wrote:

Thanks! It looks like there's no easy way out of hand weeding. I think
I'll let it go for a few weeks though. A series of recent Pacific
storms has resulted in temps down around freezing at night. Maybe that
tall, dead grass surrounding the plants is helping to keep them warm
at night.


they are pretty cold tolerant
and hardy plants.

now is a good time to get the
weeds out and the soil prepared
before the active growing season
starts. you might even uproot
some of them, plug 'em back in the
dirt and water them when you're
done and most will survive.


Thanks for your advice!


you're welcome,


songbird


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Strawberry weeding advice Edward Edible Gardening 4 01-03-2011 06:07 PM
theory of getting-on-top and theory of weeding Archimedes Plutonium sci.agriculture 14 09-05-2003 02:32 PM
Robot to your weeding? Drakanthus United Kingdom 1 04-05-2003 01:08 PM
Newbie Weeding question DDEckerslyke United Kingdom 16 27-04-2003 08:21 PM
Chemical weeding arround young trees John Towill United Kingdom 2 26-02-2003 09:15 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:08 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017