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Old 18-06-2016, 04:43 PM
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Default What type of weed is this?

My lawn, in certain parts, has been overrun with this weed for years. No sooner do I kill it off, and scarify, it's back, and with a vengeance!

Can anyone tell me what type of weed it is and how I can get rid of it for good?

It is in a part of the garden which gets very little sunlight, is often damp, and where the grass coverage is patchy, at best, despite me using shady grass seed.

Any advice welcome

Cheers
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Old 18-06-2016, 07:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maf20 View Post
My lawn, in certain parts, has been overrun with this weed for years. No sooner do I kill it off, and scarify, it's back, and with a vengeance!

Can anyone tell me what type of weed it is and how I can get rid of it for good?

It is in a part of the garden which gets very little sunlight, is often damp, and where the grass coverage is patchy, at best, despite me using shady grass seed.

Any advice welcome

Cheers
I forgot to mention. I've also put a bit of sand down, last year, and have been spiking to try and keep it drier

Cheers
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Old 18-06-2016, 11:59 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

On 6/18/2016 11:43 AM, maf20 wrote:
My lawn, in certain parts, has been overrun with this weed for years.
No sooner do I kill it off, and scarify, it's back, and with a
vengeance!

Can anyone tell me what type of weed it is and how I can get rid of it
for good?

It is in a part of the garden which gets very little sunlight, is often
damp, and where the grass coverage is patchy, at best, despite me using
shady grass seed.

Any advice welcome

Cheers


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Looks like ground ivy:
https://njaes.rutgers.edu/pubs/fs1219/
It's a persistent problem in my lawn too.
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Old 19-06-2016, 07:58 AM
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Thanks for your reply. Looking at the pictures of ground ivy, I'm not sure it might be that. The weed I have is very much flat stuff. The ground ivy looks a bit mor 3D?

I could be wrong

Thanks again
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Old 19-06-2016, 01:01 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

On 6/19/2016 2:58 AM, maf20 wrote:
Thanks for your reply. Looking at the pictures of ground ivy, I'm not
sure it might be that. The weed I have is very much flat stuff. The
ground ivy looks a bit mor 3D?

I could be wrong

Thanks again


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I'm no where near a a gardening expert but think if leaves are connected
by a vine then it is a ground ivy. A broad-leaf spray should work to
control it.

I pull it and spray it but have boundaries where I can't control it and
it keeps coming back.


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Old 19-06-2016, 05:42 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

Frank wrote:
....
I'm no where near a a gardening expert but think if leaves are connected
by a vine then it is a ground ivy. A broad-leaf spray should work to
control it.

I pull it and spray it but have boundaries where I can't control it and
it keeps coming back.


put a trench in and bury a few layers of thick black plastic
(make sure seams are overlapped and folded/pinned in place
before refilling trench). most weed roots will not go down
more than a foot or two. the creeping ground covers may go
even less (a foot or so is probably plenty). that ways they
can't reinvade...

i need to do this along one of our drainage ditches as
the grass that grows along there is very invasive and very
tough to get out of the clay once it gets established...

i don't use weed sprays if i can help it so any barriers
and mulches i can use to smother and keep things from
spreading the better it is. a few layers of cardboard
(overlapped again) and then topped by wood chips (deep
enough to cover and keep light out) will smother almost
anything. by the time the cardboard breaks down (one or
more years depending upon how wet your location is) the
plant roots underneath have given up. from then on as
long as you don't disturb the soil and just top it off
with fresh wood chips once in a while the area will be
easier to take care of. weeds are also much easier to
remove from mulch if you get them early enough.

p.s. strawberries like such mulched areas too if they
get enough light and moisture...


songbird
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Old 19-06-2016, 06:25 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

On 6/19/2016 12:42 PM, songbird wrote:
Frank wrote:
...
I'm no where near a a gardening expert but think if leaves are connected
by a vine then it is a ground ivy. A broad-leaf spray should work to
control it.

I pull it and spray it but have boundaries where I can't control it and
it keeps coming back.


put a trench in and bury a few layers of thick black plastic
(make sure seams are overlapped and folded/pinned in place
before refilling trench). most weed roots will not go down
more than a foot or two. the creeping ground covers may go
even less (a foot or so is probably plenty). that ways they
can't reinvade...

i need to do this along one of our drainage ditches as
the grass that grows along there is very invasive and very
tough to get out of the clay once it gets established...

i don't use weed sprays if i can help it so any barriers
and mulches i can use to smother and keep things from
spreading the better it is. a few layers of cardboard
(overlapped again) and then topped by wood chips (deep
enough to cover and keep light out) will smother almost
anything. by the time the cardboard breaks down (one or
more years depending upon how wet your location is) the
plant roots underneath have given up. from then on as
long as you don't disturb the soil and just top it off
with fresh wood chips once in a while the area will be
easier to take care of. weeds are also much easier to
remove from mulch if you get them early enough.

p.s. strawberries like such mulched areas too if they
get enough light and moisture...


songbird

I've got neighbors on three sides that let their land in these areas
grow wild. Land is very hilly and essentially non-development. Also
there are banks that I can't control so I cannot cut it off. Think you
helped me identify the invasive Japanese stilt grass which neighbors
just cut but do not eradicate and only constant application of
pre-emergent can do.

Some one in another garden group was concerned about English ivy
spreading out of hand and I cannot even grow it on my lower banks
because the deer love it in the winter.

I keep the grass in front and near back of the house orderly and weed
free but not the far back. I can keep ground ivy down but it has
permanent residence in my neighborhood.
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Old 22-06-2016, 04:39 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

On 6/18/2016 10:43 AM, maf20 wrote:
My lawn, in certain parts, has been overrun with this weed for years.
No sooner do I kill it off, and scarify, it's back, and with a
vengeance!

Can anyone tell me what type of weed it is and how I can get rid of it
for good?

It is in a part of the garden which gets very little sunlight, is often
damp, and where the grass coverage is patchy, at best, despite me using
shady grass seed.

Any advice welcome


It's a liverwort - Pellia epiphylla.

It likes the damp. As long as that area stays damp, it'll keep coming
back. If you can improve the drainage, that will help.
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Old 23-06-2016, 03:31 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moe DeLoughan View Post
On 6/18/2016 10:43 AM, maf20 wrote:
My lawn, in certain parts, has been overrun with this weed for years.
No sooner do I kill it off, and scarify, it's back, and with a
vengeance!

Can anyone tell me what type of weed it is and how I can get rid of it
for good?

It is in a part of the garden which gets very little sunlight, is often
damp, and where the grass coverage is patchy, at best, despite me using
shady grass seed.

Any advice welcome


It's a liverwort - Pellia epiphylla.

It likes the damp. As long as that area stays damp, it'll keep coming
back. If you can improve the drainage, that will help.
Great. Thanks for that. Trouble is, it's in a shaded corner, so it gets little wind and/or sun. Other than the obvious (spiking, forking, etc...), what other methods can be used to improve the drainage?

Cheers
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Old 24-06-2016, 06:33 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

On Thursday, June 23, 2016 at 4:25:07 PM UTC-4, maf20 wrote:
Moe DeLoughan;1020499 Wrote:
On 6/18/2016 10:43 AM, maf20 wrote:-
My lawn, in certain parts, has been overrun with this weed for years.
No sooner do I kill it off, and scarify, it's back, and with a
vengeance!

Can anyone tell me what type of weed it is and how I can get rid of it
for good?

It is in a part of the garden which gets very little sunlight, is
often
damp, and where the grass coverage is patchy, at best, despite me
using
shady grass seed.

Any advice welcome-

It's a liverwort - Pellia epiphylla.

It likes the damp. As long as that area stays damp, it'll keep coming
back. If you can improve the drainage, that will help.


Great. Thanks for that. Trouble is, it's in a shaded corner, so it gets
little wind and/or sun. Other than the obvious (spiking, forking,
etc...), what other methods can be used to improve the drainage?

Cheers


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--
maf20


Have you tried using a weed control product, like Weed B Gone?
If that doesn't work, there are other products that work on some
of the tougher to control lawn weeds. Try what's easy first.


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Old 27-06-2016, 06:49 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

On 6/23/2016 9:31 AM, maf20 wrote:
Moe DeLoughan;1020499 Wrote:
On 6/18/2016 10:43 AM, maf20 wrote:-
My lawn, in certain parts, has been overrun with this weed for years.
No sooner do I kill it off, and scarify, it's back, and with a
vengeance!

Can anyone tell me what type of weed it is and how I can get rid of it
for good?

It is in a part of the garden which gets very little sunlight, is
often
damp, and where the grass coverage is patchy, at best, despite me
using
shady grass seed.

Any advice welcome-

It's a liverwort - Pellia epiphylla.

It likes the damp. As long as that area stays damp, it'll keep coming
back. If you can improve the drainage, that will help.


Great. Thanks for that. Trouble is, it's in a shaded corner, so it gets
little wind and/or sun. Other than the obvious (spiking, forking,
etc...), what other methods can be used to improve the drainage?


In order of amount of effort involved:

1. Use a core aerator to remove plugs of soil from the area; perform
this in the spring and the fall. Spiking/forking doesn't loosen soil
and thus doesn't improve drainage.
2. Reduce the shade and increase the air movement by pruning the
vegetation in the area.
3. Raise the grade by adding more soil (preferably a sharper-draining
soil mixture) on top of the existing soil; reseed or sod.
4. Cut a small channel or swale leading to a lower-lying part of the
lawn to improve drainage.
5. Amend the soil in the area with sand/some pea gravel to improve the
drainage.

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Old 28-06-2016, 01:58 AM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

Moe DeLoughan wrote:

....
In order of amount of effort involved:


0. leave it alone, it doesn't hurt a thing.


1. Use a core aerator to remove plugs of soil from the area; perform
this in the spring and the fall. Spiking/forking doesn't loosen soil
and thus doesn't improve drainage.
2. Reduce the shade and increase the air movement by pruning the
vegetation in the area.
3. Raise the grade by adding more soil (preferably a sharper-draining
soil mixture) on top of the existing soil; reseed or sod.
4. Cut a small channel or swale leading to a lower-lying part of the
lawn to improve drainage.
5. Amend the soil in the area with sand/some pea gravel to improve the
drainage.



songbird
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Old 29-06-2016, 02:12 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

On 6/27/2016 7:58 PM, songbird wrote:
Moe DeLoughan wrote:

...
In order of amount of effort involved:


0. leave it alone, it doesn't hurt a thing.


Excellent point. It's remarkable how common it is for people to notice
something, then decide it must be a problem they need to address. For
some reason uniformity is seen as an ideal: all parts of the lawn must
look exactly the same; monoculture is to be preferred; anything
different is a problem. But nature abhors uniformity, so striving for
it is an eventually pointless exercise in masochism.


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Old 29-06-2016, 06:10 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden
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Default What type of weed is this?

Moe DeLoughan wrote:
On 6/27/2016 7:58 PM, songbird wrote:
Moe DeLoughan wrote:

...
In order of amount of effort involved:


0. leave it alone, it doesn't hurt a thing.


Excellent point. It's remarkable how common it is for people to notice
something, then decide it must be a problem they need to address. For
some reason uniformity is seen as an ideal: all parts of the lawn must
look exactly the same; monoculture is to be preferred; anything
different is a problem. But nature abhors uniformity, so striving for
it is an eventually pointless exercise in masochism.


i'm a minimalist, we just keep it mowed regularly with
a mulching mower and that selects for plants which can
survive that treatment. the rabbits come in and remove
the dandelions, plantains and clovers for me. there's
not much lawn left here (all been turned into about an
acre of gardens and decorations or mulched).

at the moment the grass is all brown from lack of
rain (2 months earlier than normal), but the other
gardens look just fine. veggies i have to water.
last year i didn't have to water much at all other
than to get things started.


songbird


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