Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #16   Report Post  
Old 04-05-2004, 04:06 AM
DIE SPAMMER !!!
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proper grass height.

We're about 100 ft from a stream and uphill of it. As for soil, it
seems very orgainic, hold water very well, and weeds love it.

Wouldn't rolling the yard really compress and damage the grass roots?


the grass root is not that delicate. the grass roots can go several inches below
the soil surface. the wide surface area of the roller is not narrow enough to
ruin the soil surface area and harm the grass roots.


  #17   Report Post  
Old 04-05-2004, 04:06 AM
DIE SPAMMER !!!
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proper grass height.

I respectfully disagree. With your type of grass the shorter you cut it, to
a degree at least, the more grass plants you will get per square foot and
the thicker your lawn will get. Kentucky Bluegrass seems to do best at about
1 1/2".


shorter grass promotes root growth. less grass plant means more energy towards
the roots...

  #18   Report Post  
Old 04-05-2004, 04:06 AM
GFRfan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proper grass height.

DIE SPAMMER !!! wrote:
I just moved in under two years ago(aug 03), but I figure the lawn is
from when the house was built(93). The lawn wasn't very healthy.
Come the first spring here, even with alot of rain(2003), the yard had
large brown patches. I checked the grass when I was putting down fert
spikes for our trees, and the grass came up in sheets with lots of
grubs. All of 2003 I seeded(before crabgrass preventor), fertilized(4
step program), and milky spored the yard. Now it's 2004, the yard
looks nice and dark green, but if you go down to the dirt level, it's
got lines and bare dirt. Weird how my yard is very lumpy, figure
it's cause the dirt doesn't seem to dry out.



the lumps are cause by worms sometimes. . if you dig a few up, you might notice
worms in them and they are probably under the main grass "plant".



And that would also account for the "lines" you reported.

--
Yard and Garden Handyman
  #22   Report Post  
Old 04-05-2004, 04:07 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proper grass height.

On Tue, 04 May 2004 01:09:12 GMT, GFRfan wrote:

Peter H wrote:
"GFRfan" wrote in message
...

wrote:

Hi Everyone,

Today is Monday, I mowed on Friday, and everyone else around me mowed
in the last 3 days also. My yard looks overgrown compared to my
neighbors already. Am I mowing too high?

Types of grass: blue grass, Tall Fescue, and perenial rye.

I cut at 3" to 3-1/2"

Thanks for the feedback, please post your replies here.

later,

tom




********************************************** *****
http://www.Intertainia.com
********************************************** *****


I don't know where you are or how short your neighbors cut their lawn
but for an answer, in July, look at your lawn and then look at your
neighbors lawn. That will be your answer. I'm betting yours will look a
lot healthier. Most people cut their lawn way too short and then rely on
chemicals to control weeds. With the longer lawn, you smother most weeds
and shade the ground, which also helps keep the roots cooler and
conserves moisture. 2" is my minimum but 3" to 3 1/2" is not
unreasonable in my area.

--
Yard and Garden Handyman



I respectfully disagree. With your type of grass the shorter you cut it, to
a degree at least, the more grass plants you will get per square foot and
the thicker your lawn will get. Kentucky Bluegrass seems to do best at about
1 1/2".

When I first got into the business, about 15 years ago, I chanted the same
old mantra that everyone else did. Cut your grass longer, water less
frequently but deeper, aerate annually, mulch your clippings. What I found
was that a longer lawn will encourage a thinner lawn and insect and disease
growth as well. I ended up with only a few recommendations.
- only cut 1/3 of the blade each time you cut
- water sparingly, if at all and water in the early morning
- ALWAYS suspect an insect when your lawn is suffering
- only fertilize in the spring and fall, never in the summer
- cut it a wee bit shorter for the last cut of the year
- blanket spray the weeds at 1/2 the recommended rate twice a year, once
in spring and once in the fall.

That's my perspective anyway.

Peter H




I'm curious. I think I'll try your way on part of my land and see if it
is better.
I agree on the cutting of 1/3 of the blade, fertilizing only in spring
and fall (to avoid burn) and cutting it shorter for the winter. I still
think 1 1/2 inches is too short but I'll find out if you're right. I'll
post back the results in a year. Always open to different ideas. Thanks.



I too have a problem with the 1-1/2" height thing, enough that I don't
think I'll experiment with that. But the rest makes sense.

In scotts 4 step there is a summer guard step, why would you not fert
in the summer?

tom







***************** Check Us Out *****************

http://www.CarFleaMarket.com

We help you sell off-line as well as online.
  #23   Report Post  
Old 04-05-2004, 04:08 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proper grass height.

On Mon, 3 May 2004 20:40:17 -0500, "RoyDMercer"
wrote:

"Peter H" wrote in message
. net.cable.rogers.com...

"GFRfan" wrote in message
...
wrote:
Hi Everyone,

Today is Monday, I mowed on Friday, and everyone else around me mowed
in the last 3 days also. My yard looks overgrown compared to my
neighbors already. Am I mowing too high?

Types of grass: blue grass, Tall Fescue, and perenial rye.

I cut at 3" to 3-1/2"

Thanks for the feedback, please post your replies here.

later,

tom




************************************************** *
http://www.Intertainia.com
************************************************** *


I don't know where you are or how short your neighbors cut their lawn
but for an answer, in July, look at your lawn and then look at your
neighbors lawn. That will be your answer. I'm betting yours will look a
lot healthier. Most people cut their lawn way too short and then rely on
chemicals to control weeds. With the longer lawn, you smother most weeds
and shade the ground, which also helps keep the roots cooler and
conserves moisture. 2" is my minimum but 3" to 3 1/2" is not
unreasonable in my area.

--
Yard and Garden Handyman


I respectfully disagree. With your type of grass the shorter you cut it,

to
a degree at least, the more grass plants you will get per square foot and
the thicker your lawn will get. Kentucky Bluegrass seems to do best at

about
1 1/2".

When I first got into the business, about 15 years ago, I chanted the same
old mantra that everyone else did. Cut your grass longer, water less
frequently but deeper, aerate annually, mulch your clippings. What I found
was that a longer lawn will encourage a thinner lawn and insect and

disease
growth as well. I ended up with only a few recommendations.
- only cut 1/3 of the blade each time you cut
- water sparingly, if at all and water in the early morning
- ALWAYS suspect an insect when your lawn is suffering
- only fertilize in the spring and fall, never in the summer
- cut it a wee bit shorter for the last cut of the year
- blanket spray the weeds at 1/2 the recommended rate twice a year,

once
in spring and once in the fall.

That's my perspective anyway.

Peter H


Actually mowing higher will prevent some weed growth because the taller
grass will shade the soil which prevents weed seeds from germinating.
However keeping grass mowed shorter encourages deeper root growth and
thicker lawns, which prevents weeds also.

I have a warm season grass (Bermuda) I leave it tall in the fall and
throughout the winter and early spring (when the grass is dormant) and weeds
are actively trying to germinate. Later in the spring when the grass starts
to come out of dormancy, I gradually cut it lower each time until I reach 1
1/2 inches. I leave it short throughout the growing season for the reasons
you mentioned. Proper mowing height is dependant on what type of grass you
have. Hybrid Bermuda does well cut as short as 1/2", but some grass
varieties need to be as much as 3-4" to do well.

I prefer to use pre-emergent products to prevent weeds rather than blanket
spraying for them. Whatever makes it past the pre-emergence, I spot treat.

You are very correct about cutting no more than 1/3rd of the blade's height.
I actually shoot for 1/4 of the blade's height. So right now I'm mowing
every 3-4 days. The shorter your grass is the more often you need to mow.
Also, the shorter you mow your lawn, the less water it needs to stay
healthy.


The Shorter the mowing, less watering? I heard shorter the grass more
likely it will dry out. Can you explain?

thx,

tom




************************ Our Sites *************************************
http://www.CarFleaMarket.com - Auto Classifieds.
http://www.FindMeShelter.com - Post Free Text House Ads.
http://www.PeekABooLinks.com - Adults Only! Free Galleries.
http://www.VoyeurJunction.com - Adults Only! Free Galleries.
************************************************** ***********************
  #24   Report Post  
Old 04-05-2004, 11:06 PM
RoyDMercer
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proper grass height.

wrote in message
news
On Mon, 3 May 2004 20:40:17 -0500, "RoyDMercer"
wrote:
Actually mowing higher will prevent some weed growth because the taller
grass will shade the soil which prevents weed seeds from germinating.
However keeping grass mowed shorter encourages deeper root growth and
thicker lawns, which prevents weeds also.

I have a warm season grass (Bermuda) I leave it tall in the fall and
throughout the winter and early spring (when the grass is dormant) and

weeds
are actively trying to germinate. Later in the spring when the grass

starts
to come out of dormancy, I gradually cut it lower each time until I reach

1
1/2 inches. I leave it short throughout the growing season for the

reasons
you mentioned. Proper mowing height is dependant on what type of grass

you
have. Hybrid Bermuda does well cut as short as 1/2", but some grass
varieties need to be as much as 3-4" to do well.

I prefer to use pre-emergent products to prevent weeds rather than

blanket
spraying for them. Whatever makes it past the pre-emergence, I spot

treat.

You are very correct about cutting no more than 1/3rd of the blade's

height.
I actually shoot for 1/4 of the blade's height. So right now I'm mowing
every 3-4 days. The shorter your grass is the more often you need to

mow.
Also, the shorter you mow your lawn, the less water it needs to stay
healthy.


The Shorter the mowing, less watering? I heard shorter the grass more
likely it will dry out. Can you explain?


I was referring to lawns mowed much higher than recommended. If you are
mowing so short that the soil is exposed, then yes, the soil will dry out
and you'll need to water more. However longer grass equates to a higher
Water Use Rate (WUR). The reason for this is because the higher the leaf
area, the more water will be lost to transpiration. This is why it's
important to mow at the proper height, for the lawn type you have. If the
lawn is mowed way too short, the soil can be exposed and water can be lost
to soil evaporation. If the lawn is mowed way too long, water will be lost
to excessive transpiration.

Quite a few horticultural publications and web sites recommend allowing
grass to grow longer to decrease irrigation rates. What many of them don't
tell you is letting the grass get too long has the reverse effect.




  #25   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2004, 02:06 AM
Peter H
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proper grass height.


wrote in message
...
On Tue, 04 May 2004 01:09:12 GMT, GFRfan wrote:

Peter H wrote:
"GFRfan" wrote in message
...

wrote:

Hi Everyone,

Today is Monday, I mowed on Friday, and everyone else around me mowed
in the last 3 days also. My yard looks overgrown compared to my
neighbors already. Am I mowing too high?

Types of grass: blue grass, Tall Fescue, and perenial rye.

I cut at 3" to 3-1/2"

Thanks for the feedback, please post your replies here.

later,

tom




********************************************** *****
http://www.Intertainia.com
********************************************** *****


I don't know where you are or how short your neighbors cut their lawn
but for an answer, in July, look at your lawn and then look at your
neighbors lawn. That will be your answer. I'm betting yours will look a
lot healthier. Most people cut their lawn way too short and then rely

on
chemicals to control weeds. With the longer lawn, you smother most

weeds
and shade the ground, which also helps keep the roots cooler and
conserves moisture. 2" is my minimum but 3" to 3 1/2" is not
unreasonable in my area.

--
Yard and Garden Handyman


I respectfully disagree. With your type of grass the shorter you cut

it, to
a degree at least, the more grass plants you will get per square foot

and
the thicker your lawn will get. Kentucky Bluegrass seems to do best at

about
1 1/2".

When I first got into the business, about 15 years ago, I chanted the

same
old mantra that everyone else did. Cut your grass longer, water less
frequently but deeper, aerate annually, mulch your clippings. What I

found
was that a longer lawn will encourage a thinner lawn and insect and

disease
growth as well. I ended up with only a few recommendations.
- only cut 1/3 of the blade each time you cut
- water sparingly, if at all and water in the early morning
- ALWAYS suspect an insect when your lawn is suffering
- only fertilize in the spring and fall, never in the summer
- cut it a wee bit shorter for the last cut of the year
- blanket spray the weeds at 1/2 the recommended rate twice a year,

once
in spring and once in the fall.

That's my perspective anyway.

Peter H




I'm curious. I think I'll try your way on part of my land and see if it
is better.
I agree on the cutting of 1/3 of the blade, fertilizing only in spring
and fall (to avoid burn) and cutting it shorter for the winter. I still
think 1 1/2 inches is too short but I'll find out if you're right. I'll
post back the results in a year. Always open to different ideas. Thanks.



I too have a problem with the 1-1/2" height thing, enough that I don't
think I'll experiment with that. But the rest makes sense.

In scotts 4 step there is a summer guard step, why would you not fert
in the summer?

tom


The grasses you are growing are what are considered to be "cool-season
turfgrasses". These varieties only want to grow when the temperature is from
about 50 degrees to 80F or thereabouts. If it gets any warmer they try to
shut down and go dormant. You can, of course, force them to grow through the
heat of the summer by fertilizing and/or watering them, but there is a down
side. You set them up for disease infestation.

Homeowners with sprinkler systems are the most susceptible. When I was in
the business I used to cringe when I was quoting a lawn with a sprinkler
system, particularly if I knew the owner was a real keener.

Peter H




  #26   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2004, 07:03 PM
Steveo
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proper grass height.

"Peter H" wrote:
Homeowners with sprinkler systems are the most susceptible.


Bull,cool season turfgrass needs water. There's no better way of applying
it than with an irrigation system.

When I was in
the business I used to cringe when I was quoting a lawn with a sprinkler
system, particularly if I knew the owner was a real keener.

Peter H

It's a good thing you got out of the business then. I'd guess 50% of
the lawns I service have irrigation systems. The people who don't
water present more problems than those that do.

--
I won't retire, but I might retread.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cutting grass height billw Lawns 7 27-05-2005 07:07 PM
proper cutting height RB Lawns 10 12-05-2005 11:03 PM
Lawn grass height Juco United Kingdom 1 12-09-2004 02:42 PM
Uneven grass height after mowing with my new Toro Recycler??-Suggestions Please?? m olofson Lawns 8 02-10-2003 06:05 AM
Uneven grass height after mowing with my new Toro Recycler??-Suggestions Jim Gilliland Lawns 0 24-08-2003 08:22 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:38 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017