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Old 11-07-2006, 05:28 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Kira Dirlik
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pepper problems

With all my past problems, I could always count on trouble-free
peppers. However this year, something has gotten into my 19 pepper
plants (of 6 varieties). Starts on the lowest leaves. If you turn
over the leaves, they seem to have wet, darker spots... almost as if
you put drops of boiling water on them and cooked those parts. These
spots enlarge and turn yellow or transparent and die. Soon the leaf
falls off and ones further up the stem get infected. Sevin doesn't
help. Of my 19 peppers, I pick up and throw away up to 60 fallen
leaves every day. Plants are now very tall, with long naked stems,
very few flowers, and all are just struggling to survive. Anyone
know what is causing this?
Thanks.
Kira

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Old 11-07-2006, 07:04 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Steve
 
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Default Pepper problems

In article ,
Kira Dirlik !! wrote:
However this year, something has gotten into my 19 pepper
plants (of 6 varieties). Starts on the lowest leaves.


It sounds more like a blight or a fungus then insects, so an insecticide
like Sevin isn't going to help. Maybe stem blight?

http://chatham.ces.ncsu.edu/growings...ghtpepper.html

--
Steve

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Old 13-07-2006, 09:55 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Kira Dirlik
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pepper problems


However this year, something has gotten into my 19 pepper
plants (of 6 varieties). Starts on the lowest leaves.


It sounds more like a blight or a fungus then insects, so an insecticide
like Sevin isn't going to help. Maybe stem blight?


http://chatham.ces.ncsu.edu/growings...ghtpepper.html

Steve


Thanks, but no, that isn't it. The stems look perfectly healthy, and
no weird stuff at the bases. And the really unique symtom is what
looks like "cooked" spots. These are especially apparent on the
underneath of the leaves... darker green, wet, "cooked" spots as
though boiling water had been splashed onto them. Gets the
bottommost leaves first and works up. I think it is the same as what
got my sunflowers in years past.
Confession: about 4 days ago I sprayed them all with Home and Garden
Raid! Since no flowers, much less any peppers, had formed yet, I
figured I wouldn't poison myself. I set it up for each in line thus:
spray can, pepper plant, cafeteria tray as barrier, other plants
behind. I made sure none got on plants that were totally edible like
dill, basil, kale, etc. AND I just saw now that new leaves have come
out the top looking good, and even some new sprouts at the joints
where former leaves had fallen off.
Last year I put some of my sunflower leaves that had this in between
some wax paper and pressed them. Weeks later I noticed little trails
coming from the leaves of something trying to escape, but invisible to
the eye. I wonder if I brought this into my garden on a purchased
jalapeno (others all were grown from seed). That plant just never
"was right".
Kira

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Old 14-07-2006, 03:42 AM posted to triangle.gardens
Anne Lurie
 
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Default bringing plants in, was Pepper problems

Kira,


Dang, girl, where have you been????? I have missed you here at
triangle.gardens!!!!

You might indeed have brought the problem into your garden with the
"purchased" jalapeno -- but I just wanted to add my own little cautionary
tale here.....

For those of you who have had problems with swallowtail butterflies
decimating your parsley plants: if you repot the parsley and put it on a
porch, say, before you bring it into the kitchen for the winter -- Check
to make sure there are no voles in the pots when you bring the plants
in!!!!!

Been there, done that -- and NO, I have no excuse for not noticing the
"hole" in the nice soft potting soil!!!

Anne


"Kira Dirlik" !! wrote in message
...

However this year, something has gotten into my 19 pepper
plants (of 6 varieties). Starts on the lowest leaves.


It sounds more like a blight or a fungus then insects, so an insecticide
like Sevin isn't going to help. Maybe stem blight?


http://chatham.ces.ncsu.edu/growings...ghtpepper.html

Steve


Thanks, but no, that isn't it. The stems look perfectly healthy, and
no weird stuff at the bases. And the really unique symtom is what
looks like "cooked" spots. These are especially apparent on the
underneath of the leaves... darker green, wet, "cooked" spots as
though boiling water had been splashed onto them. Gets the
bottommost leaves first and works up. I think it is the same as what
got my sunflowers in years past.
Confession: about 4 days ago I sprayed them all with Home and Garden
Raid! Since no flowers, much less any peppers, had formed yet, I
figured I wouldn't poison myself. I set it up for each in line thus:
spray can, pepper plant, cafeteria tray as barrier, other plants
behind. I made sure none got on plants that were totally edible like
dill, basil, kale, etc. AND I just saw now that new leaves have come
out the top looking good, and even some new sprouts at the joints
where former leaves had fallen off.
Last year I put some of my sunflower leaves that had this in between
some wax paper and pressed them. Weeks later I noticed little trails
coming from the leaves of something trying to escape, but invisible to
the eye. I wonder if I brought this into my garden on a purchased
jalapeno (others all were grown from seed). That plant just never
"was right".
Kira



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Old 15-07-2006, 05:09 AM posted to triangle.gardens
Kira Dirlik
 
Posts: n/a
Default bringing plants in, was Pepper problems

On Fri, 14 Jul 2006 01:42:55 GMT, "Anne Lurie"
wrote:
Kira,
Dang, girl, where have you been????? I have missed you here at
triangle.gardens!!!!


Yes, I live still ! Glad to see some familiar names still in the NG.
I have to admit, computerwise, I have wasted many, many hours on the
LOST newsgroup. (Any other LOST addicts out there? TV... ABC.... Wed
nights).
My local Ag. agent came out last summer and told me, considering I am
in deep woods, with minimal sun, and no air circulation, I am doing a
fantastic job with my gardening attempts. But my ONE continual
success story: Peppers!!! That is a real heartbreaker for that to
end.
Peppers look weak again today. Raid not doing the trick. New
energy apparently came from the fertilizer I put on them last week,
but the baddie is winning. Sigh.
Kira



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Old 16-07-2006, 07:15 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Jo
 
Posts: n/a
Default bringing plants in, was Pepper problems

Kira Dirlik wrote:
On Fri, 14 Jul 2006 01:42:55 GMT, "Anne Lurie"
wrote:

Kira,
Dang, girl, where have you been????? I have missed you here at
triangle.gardens!!!!



Yes, I live still ! Glad to see some familiar names still in the NG.
I have to admit, computerwise, I have wasted many, many hours on the
LOST newsgroup. (Any other LOST addicts out there? TV... ABC.... Wed
nights).
My local Ag. agent came out last summer and told me, considering I am
in deep woods, with minimal sun, and no air circulation, I am doing a
fantastic job with my gardening attempts. But my ONE continual
success story: Peppers!!! That is a real heartbreaker for that to
end.
Peppers look weak again today. Raid not doing the trick. New
energy apparently came from the fertilizer I put on them last week,
but the baddie is winning. Sigh.
Kira


You might not want to use Raid on the plants. It getes absorbed into the
plant and then makes the peppers high in pesticide levels. (And the
other plants around them from run off)

Get some DE and cover the stems and under the leaves with them. It will
kill anything on them. Avoid getting it on the flowers or the leaves
near the flowers.

Or you could try a little dish soap and water. That one works really well.


Jo
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Old 20-07-2006, 08:05 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Kira Dirlik
 
Posts: n/a
Default Peppers, and soil

On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 17:15:31 GMT, Jo wrote:

You might not want to use Raid on the plants. It getes absorbed into the
plant and then makes the peppers high in pesticide levels. (And the
other plants around them from run off)

Get some DE and cover the stems and under the leaves with them. It will
kill anything on them. Avoid getting it on the flowers or the leaves
near the flowers.

Or you could try a little dish soap and water. That one works really well.
Jo


I know Raid is bad. But I just wanted to try it that once to test
if it is actual critters, or some kind of blight that would be
unaffected by pesticides. Is DE that diatomatus (sp) earth?
This year is probably a bust. Does anyone know if there is a way
to have a 100% fresh start next year? I can't move to an entirely new
area, because my current garden is the only place that gets max sun
(and that only for a few hours.... very tall trees surround). Would
covering it all winter with black plastic kill all the baddies
underneath?
Thanks.
Kira
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Old 20-07-2006, 08:42 PM posted to triangle.gardens
?
 
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Default Peppers, and soil

On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 18:05:58 GMT in Kira Dirlik !! wrote:
On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 17:15:31 GMT, Jo wrote:

You might not want to use Raid on the plants. It getes absorbed into the
plant and then makes the peppers high in pesticide levels. (And the
other plants around them from run off)

Get some DE and cover the stems and under the leaves with them. It will
kill anything on them. Avoid getting it on the flowers or the leaves
near the flowers.

Or you could try a little dish soap and water. That one works really well.
Jo


I know Raid is bad. But I just wanted to try it that once to test
if it is actual critters, or some kind of blight that would be
unaffected by pesticides. Is DE that diatomatus (sp) earth?
This year is probably a bust. Does anyone know if there is a way
to have a 100% fresh start next year? I can't move to an entirely new
area, because my current garden is the only place that gets max sun
(and that only for a few hours.... very tall trees surround). Would
covering it all winter with black plastic kill all the baddies
underneath?
Thanks.


Grow in containers.
Need containers, try the cary dump.
Kira



--
Chris Dukes
"The key to effective management is properly timed hovering."
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Old 20-07-2006, 11:56 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Jo
 
Posts: n/a
Default Peppers, and soil

Kira Dirlik wrote:
On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 17:15:31 GMT, Jo wrote:


You might not want to use Raid on the plants. It getes absorbed into the
plant and then makes the peppers high in pesticide levels. (And the
other plants around them from run off)

Get some DE and cover the stems and under the leaves with them. It will
kill anything on them. Avoid getting it on the flowers or the leaves
near the flowers.

Or you could try a little dish soap and water. That one works really well.
Jo



I know Raid is bad. But I just wanted to try it that once to test
if it is actual critters, or some kind of blight that would be
unaffected by pesticides. Is DE that diatomatus (sp) earth?
This year is probably a bust. Does anyone know if there is a way
to have a 100% fresh start next year? I can't move to an entirely new
area, because my current garden is the only place that gets max sun
(and that only for a few hours.... very tall trees surround). Would
covering it all winter with black plastic kill all the baddies
underneath?
Thanks.
Kira


Thats yes on the DE, I know what a pain to spell. LOL
Another poster said containers, you can get some really nice ones at
Broadwells. I got very large containers there last week.

Go he
http://www.biconet.com/

Look up your critters and see what they recommend for natural control of
them.

I stopped tilling and have gone to sustainable gardening and have
noticed that has helped quite a bit. You can plant other plants that
will help guard your harvest.

I know there are plant guides out there somewhere that tell you which
plants help others. I will try to find it in my bookmarks later. The
little one calls for dinner.

Jo
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Old 23-07-2006, 12:44 AM posted to triangle.gardens
Kira Dirlik
 
Posts: n/a
Default Peppers, and soil

On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 21:56:35 GMT, Jo wrote:


Look up your critters and see what they recommend for natural control of
them.
I stopped tilling and have gone to sustainable gardening and have
noticed that has helped quite a bit. You can plant other plants that
will help guard your harvest.
I know there are plant guides out there somewhere that tell you which
plants help others. I will try to find it in my bookmarks later. The
little one calls for dinner.
Jo


Big problem with the "critters" is trying to identify them, or it,
whatever it is.
I can't possibly calculate the workhours spent making solid clay into
gorgeous soil over the last 11 years... I compost everything possible
into it. I grind up the fall leaves with the lawnmower and have
plentiful mulch for it every year. In spring I plant the plants with
compost, topsoil, and permatil (to fight off the voles). It has
always worked all these years. It would be really hard for me to
suddenly do the suburban deck thing with containers and abandon that
loose, black soil to the elements.
I just wish I could kill whatever the problem is, and start fresh.
Cheers,
Kira



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Old 24-07-2006, 06:30 PM posted to triangle.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 54
Default Peppers, and soil

On 2006-07-22, Kira Dirlik !! wrote:
On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 21:56:35 GMT, Jo wrote:


Look up your critters and see what they recommend for natural control of
them.
I stopped tilling and have gone to sustainable gardening and have
noticed that has helped quite a bit. You can plant other plants that
will help guard your harvest.
I know there are plant guides out there somewhere that tell you which
plants help others. I will try to find it in my bookmarks later. The
little one calls for dinner.
Jo


Big problem with the "critters" is trying to identify them, or it,
whatever it is.
I can't possibly calculate the workhours spent making solid clay into
gorgeous soil over the last 11 years... I compost everything possible
into it. I grind up the fall leaves with the lawnmower and have
plentiful mulch for it every year. In spring I plant the plants with
compost, topsoil, and permatil (to fight off the voles). It has
always worked all these years. It would be really hard for me to
suddenly do the suburban deck thing with containers and abandon that
loose, black soil to the elements.
I just wish I could kill whatever the problem is, and start fresh.
Cheers,
Kira


Could it be that you tree canopy has increased and you are not getting
as much sunlight? You may have to prune or cut back a few trees.
Planting the same plants in the same place does make plant problems
worse. YOu may have introduced some disease last year that is
manifesting it self this year. Or maybe it is just a bad year for
peppers.

--
Wes Dukes ([email protected]) Swap the . and the @ to email me please.

is a garbage address.
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Old 26-07-2006, 09:25 PM posted to triangle.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 8
Default Peppers, and soil

Kira,

I'm not sure if this was covered before in this thread, but have you been
rotating the area where you grow peppers, tomatoes, eggplants?

I think I had read about "sterlilizing" soil by covering it with clear
plastic for a period, but that might only deal with weed seeds, not critters
and/or plant diseases in the soil.

If you have the room, you might try leaving part of the garden unplanted for
a season or two, to see if that helps.

Anne



Big problem with the "critters" is trying to identify them, or it,
whatever it is.
I can't possibly calculate the workhours spent making solid clay into
gorgeous soil over the last 11 years... I compost everything possible
into it. I grind up the fall leaves with the lawnmower and have
plentiful mulch for it every year. In spring I plant the plants with
compost, topsoil, and permatil (to fight off the voles). It has
always worked all these years. It would be really hard for me to
suddenly do the suburban deck thing with containers and abandon that
loose, black soil to the elements.
I just wish I could kill whatever the problem is, and start fresh.
Cheers,
Kira



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Old 31-07-2006, 07:07 PM posted to triangle.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 10
Default Peppers, and soil

I did cut down a holly tree that was getting huge and shady (and even
sending roots into the garden). I have hundreds of hollys, but it
was still painful. The canopy of the hundred foot trees is making
more and more shade each year, because they are closing in around the
space created by my house being built. I have cut trees before. No
way I can remedy these huge old oaks, poplars, sweet gums way, way up
there, but in reality, they are not casting much more shade than they
did last year.
My garden is only about 15 x 30, but I do rotate, and have the rows go
in different directions each year, so all the soil is used differently
each year.
I have the peppers growing in several areas of the garden, and I could
see this malady spread slowly across them all, from one side of the
garden to the opposite. I bought one jalalpeno and 2 hot banana
plants, and I have a feelling I brought it in on one of those.
I've grown peppers from seed all these years, with the fun of never
knowing quite how they will mix and match with each other and what
kind of peppers will appear. It is a disaster to me to lose all that.
I have ALWAYS had a huge bumper crop and mammoth plants. I now have
ONE lonely jalapeno pepper on a very dwarfed, warped plant, and 4
banana peppers that were already starting when I bought them. All my
lovely other 16 pepper plants have not produced a single pepper. I'd
have bushels by now, in years past. Leaves continue to fall off (and
flower stems), as tips try and try and try to grow.
Kira


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