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Old 26-08-2006, 02:37 PM posted to triangle.gardens
bud bud is offline
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Default watering systems

Wes,
What was the name of that easy to put together watering system you were
telling me at work? And where did you get it? I can't remember if you said
Lowes or Home Depot.

--
Rich



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Old 27-08-2006, 12:58 PM posted to triangle.gardens
jan jan is offline
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 7
Default watering systems


bud wrote:
Wes,
What was the name of that easy to put together watering system you were
telling me at work? And where did you get it? I can't remember if you said
Lowes or Home Depot.

--
Rich


I'm also interested in drip irrigation systems, esp. hooked to rain
barrels. Any how-to appreciated, rain barrel or not.

  #3   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2006, 06:41 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 54
Default watering systems

On 2006-08-27, jan wrote:

bud wrote:
Wes,
What was the name of that easy to put together watering system you were
telling me at work? And where did you get it? I can't remember if you said
Lowes or Home Depot.

--
Rich


I'm also interested in drip irrigation systems, esp. hooked to rain
barrels. Any how-to appreciated, rain barrel or not.


At Lowes's - HD may have it also. Mister Landscaper is the brand.

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio... %20irrigation

No tools necessary except for a sharp knife. Well Maybe a large curved
jaw set of pliers for the ladies. There is a hole punching tool that
you buy to attach the drip lines to the main hose.

On Cary water pressure I needed the pressure regulator or else the drip
lines will keep blowing off. I like to keep mine plugged when not in
use to keep debris out of the line, so I had a lot of male hose ends
around since I kept all my repair stuff and had some old hoses. I plug
them with goop to make a solid plug. If you get trash in the main pipe
it will not go throught the emitters and you will have dickens of a time
keeping them dripping.

I suppose you could use rain barrels, but I don't know how much higher
than the hose they would have to be to work properly. I am doing this
to cut my water bill and be more efficient. I started last year doing
this and wish I had done it earlier since it is so easy to work with.
At first I thought well I will just make one with long enough emitter
tubing and that does not work. It is just too unwieldy. Much of mine
is on top of the ground, but I will probably cover most of it with mulch
and possibly bury it.

I don't try to use it on everything. I have 3 expensive Boulevard
Cypresses that I am assisting as they have only been in the ground sinc
last Sept. Also some shrubs, some Ajuga and lots of Azaleas.

I use the adjustable emitters that put out a max of 10 gallons per
hour. have them set about half way and run them for an hour or so per
week. I bought one of the kits at first, but still have somethings I
will never use. THe sprayers were one I used only when I ran out of
emitters.

They even make goof plugs incase you punch a hole where you did not need
it.
--
Wes Dukes ([email protected]) Swap the . and the @ to email me please.

is a garbage address.
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Old 31-08-2006, 03:07 PM posted to triangle.gardens
jan jan is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 7
Default watering systems


Thanks. I appreciate the info too.

The reason I asked about rain barrels is that I found some instructions
from the University of Florida for "building" them - if you find a
pickle or olive barrel from a store, then the downspout can simply be
diverted to the barrel. A hardware store hose bibb can be installed at
the bottom. It seems to me that a soaker hose could then be attached to
the faucet.

Here are the instructions:
http://sarasota.extension.ufl.edu/Ho...Rainbarrel.htm
"Rain barrels are a great way to reduce water bills and stormwater
runoff and to save water for a dry spell. If you have gutters on your
house, you may be able to collect 55 gallons of water during a inch
rain by directing a downspout to a rain barrel or cistern."

My garden and landscaping is downslope of my downspout, although the
diagrams have a way for raising the barrel on a little stand to provide
elevation, to use gravity to increase water pressure. Perhaps a simple
soaker hose would work for my needs, and save me a fair amount of hand
watering.

I remember my grandmothe had a rain barrel and used the water for
washing her hair and favored plants. ;-)

Here is another interesting link from the Natural Resouces and Parks
division of Kings County:
http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/PI/rainbarrels.htm
with a source of food barrels online, although I think I'd rather ask
around for a food-grade plastic barrel and fit it out myself rather
than spend on a pricey online number.

Finally, I found this general info on a third site:
http://www.composters.com/docs/rainbarrels.html

"Only 1/4 inch of rainfall runoff from the average roof will completely
fill the typical barrel. Collection of water from rooftop runoff can
provide an ample supply of this free 'soft water' containing no
chlorine, lime or calcium. Because it tends to have fewer sediments and
dissolved salts than municipal water, rain water is ideal for a
multitude of applications, including biodynamic and organic vegetable
gardens, raised planter beds for botanicals, indoor tropicals like
ferns and orchids, automobile washing, and cleaning household windows.
Saving water in this manner will reduce you demand for treated tap
water, and save money by lowering your monthly bill. Rain water
diversion will also help decrease the burden on water treatment
facilities and municipal drainage systems during storms. The storage of
rain water is also recommended for general emergency preparedness, or
for areas prone to disasters or drought. A good formula to remember: 1
inch of rain on a 1000 sq ft roof yields 623 gallons of water.
Calculate the yield of your roof by multiplying the square footage of
your roof by 623 and divide by 1000."

The site went on to suggest "mosquito donoughts" if the barrel was
uncovered (which doesn't seem wise to me in our area.)

I'll let you all know how it goes.



wrote:
On 2006-08-27, jan wrote:

bud wrote:
Wes,
What was the name of that easy to put together watering system you were
telling me at work? And where did you get it? I can't remember if you said
Lowes or Home Depot.

--
Rich


I'm also interested in drip irrigation systems, esp. hooked to rain
barrels. Any how-to appreciated, rain barrel or not.


At Lowes's - HD may have it also. Mister Landscaper is the brand.

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio... %20irrigation

No tools necessary except for a sharp knife. Well Maybe a large curved
jaw set of pliers for the ladies. There is a hole punching tool that
you buy to attach the drip lines to the main hose.

On Cary water pressure I needed the pressure regulator or else the drip
lines will keep blowing off. I like to keep mine plugged when not in
use to keep debris out of the line, so I had a lot of male hose ends
around since I kept all my repair stuff and had some old hoses. I plug
them with goop to make a solid plug. If you get trash in the main pipe
it will not go throught the emitters and you will have dickens of a time
keeping them dripping.

I suppose you could use rain barrels, but I don't know how much higher
than the hose they would have to be to work properly. I am doing this
to cut my water bill and be more efficient. I started last year doing
this and wish I had done it earlier since it is so easy to work with.
At first I thought well I will just make one with long enough emitter
tubing and that does not work. It is just too unwieldy. Much of mine
is on top of the ground, but I will probably cover most of it with mulch
and possibly bury it.

@www.spam.com is a garbage address.

  #5   Report Post  
Old 01-09-2006, 05:13 PM posted to triangle.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 6
Default watering systems

Great websites, composters.com is insane!

"jan" wrote in message
ups.com...

Thanks. I appreciate the info too.

The reason I asked about rain barrels is that I found some instructions
from the University of Florida for "building" them - if you find a
pickle or olive barrel from a store, then the downspout can simply be
diverted to the barrel. A hardware store hose bibb can be installed at
the bottom. It seems to me that a soaker hose could then be attached to
the faucet.

Here are the instructions:
http://sarasota.extension.ufl.edu/Ho...Rainbarrel.htm
"Rain barrels are a great way to reduce water bills and stormwater
runoff and to save water for a dry spell. If you have gutters on your
house, you may be able to collect 55 gallons of water during a inch
rain by directing a downspout to a rain barrel or cistern."

My garden and landscaping is downslope of my downspout, although the
diagrams have a way for raising the barrel on a little stand to provide
elevation, to use gravity to increase water pressure. Perhaps a simple
soaker hose would work for my needs, and save me a fair amount of hand
watering.

I remember my grandmothe had a rain barrel and used the water for
washing her hair and favored plants. ;-)

Here is another interesting link from the Natural Resouces and Parks
division of Kings County:
http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/PI/rainbarrels.htm
with a source of food barrels online, although I think I'd rather ask
around for a food-grade plastic barrel and fit it out myself rather
than spend on a pricey online number.

Finally, I found this general info on a third site:
http://www.composters.com/docs/rainbarrels.html

"Only 1/4 inch of rainfall runoff from the average roof will completely
fill the typical barrel. Collection of water from rooftop runoff can
provide an ample supply of this free 'soft water' containing no
chlorine, lime or calcium. Because it tends to have fewer sediments and
dissolved salts than municipal water, rain water is ideal for a
multitude of applications, including biodynamic and organic vegetable
gardens, raised planter beds for botanicals, indoor tropicals like
ferns and orchids, automobile washing, and cleaning household windows.
Saving water in this manner will reduce you demand for treated tap
water, and save money by lowering your monthly bill. Rain water
diversion will also help decrease the burden on water treatment
facilities and municipal drainage systems during storms. The storage of
rain water is also recommended for general emergency preparedness, or
for areas prone to disasters or drought. A good formula to remember: 1
inch of rain on a 1000 sq ft roof yields 623 gallons of water.
Calculate the yield of your roof by multiplying the square footage of
your roof by 623 and divide by 1000."

The site went on to suggest "mosquito donoughts" if the barrel was
uncovered (which doesn't seem wise to me in our area.)

I'll let you all know how it goes.



wrote:
On 2006-08-27, jan wrote:

bud wrote:
Wes,
What was the name of that easy to put together watering system you were
telling me at work? And where did you get it? I can't remember if you
said
Lowes or Home Depot.

--
Rich


I'm also interested in drip irrigation systems, esp. hooked to rain
barrels. Any how-to appreciated, rain barrel or not.


At Lowes's - HD may have it also. Mister Landscaper is the brand.

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio... %20irrigation

No tools necessary except for a sharp knife. Well Maybe a large curved
jaw set of pliers for the ladies. There is a hole punching tool that
you buy to attach the drip lines to the main hose.

On Cary water pressure I needed the pressure regulator or else the drip
lines will keep blowing off. I like to keep mine plugged when not in
use to keep debris out of the line, so I had a lot of male hose ends
around since I kept all my repair stuff and had some old hoses. I plug
them with goop to make a solid plug. If you get trash in the main pipe
it will not go throught the emitters and you will have dickens of a time
keeping them dripping.

I suppose you could use rain barrels, but I don't know how much higher
than the hose they would have to be to work properly. I am doing this
to cut my water bill and be more efficient. I started last year doing
this and wish I had done it earlier since it is so easy to work with.
At first I thought well I will just make one with long enough emitter
tubing and that does not work. It is just too unwieldy. Much of mine
is on top of the ground, but I will probably cover most of it with mulch
and possibly bury it.

@www.spam.com is a garbage address.




  #6   Report Post  
Old 01-09-2006, 05:23 PM posted to triangle.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 54
Default watering systems

On 2006-08-31, jan wrote:

Thanks. I appreciate the info too.

The reason I asked about rain barrels is that I found some instructions
from the University of Florida for "building" them - if you find a
pickle or olive barrel from a store, then the downspout can simply be
diverted to the barrel. A hardware store hose bibb can be installed at
the bottom. It seems to me that a soaker hose could then be attached to
the faucet.

Here are the instructions:
http://sarasota.extension.ufl.edu/Ho...Rainbarrel.htm
"Rain barrels are a great way to reduce water bills and stormwater
runoff and to save water for a dry spell. If you have gutters on your
house, you may be able to collect 55 gallons of water during a inch
rain by directing a downspout to a rain barrel or cistern."

My garden and landscaping is downslope of my downspout, although the
diagrams have a way for raising the barrel on a little stand to provide
elevation, to use gravity to increase water pressure. Perhaps a simple
soaker hose would work for my needs, and save me a fair amount of hand
watering.

I remember my grandmothe had a rain barrel and used the water for
washing her hair and favored plants. ;-)

Here is another interesting link from the Natural Resouces and Parks
division of Kings County:
http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/PI/rainbarrels.htm
with a source of food barrels online, although I think I'd rather ask
around for a food-grade plastic barrel and fit it out myself rather
than spend on a pricey online number.

Finally, I found this general info on a third site:
http://www.composters.com/docs/rainbarrels.html

"Only 1/4 inch of rainfall runoff from the average roof will completely
fill the typical barrel. Collection of water from rooftop runoff can
provide an ample supply of this free 'soft water' containing no
chlorine, lime or calcium. Because it tends to have fewer sediments and
dissolved salts than municipal water, rain water is ideal for a
multitude of applications, including biodynamic and organic vegetable
gardens, raised planter beds for botanicals, indoor tropicals like
ferns and orchids, automobile washing, and cleaning household windows.
Saving water in this manner will reduce you demand for treated tap
water, and save money by lowering your monthly bill. Rain water
diversion will also help decrease the burden on water treatment
facilities and municipal drainage systems during storms. The storage of
rain water is also recommended for general emergency preparedness, or
for areas prone to disasters or drought. A good formula to remember: 1
inch of rain on a 1000 sq ft roof yields 623 gallons of water.
Calculate the yield of your roof by multiplying the square footage of
your roof by 623 and divide by 1000."

The site went on to suggest "mosquito donoughts" if the barrel was
uncovered (which doesn't seem wise to me in our area.)

I'll let you all know how it goes.


55 gallons would be about an inch of water for 100 sqft. YOu may want
to price large farm tanks at Agri supply. I know one person who got a
600 gallon tank, piped his gutters to it and screened it with a fence.
That would be equivalent to 12 50 gallon barrels so just the faucets
alone would be a chunk of change.

But I don't know how much you have to water so 55 gallons may be enough
for you. Most rain barrels I have seen at garden centers properly
outfitted sell for around $100.



wrote:
On 2006-08-27, jan wrote:

bud wrote:
Wes,
What was the name of that easy to put together watering system you were
telling me at work? And where did you get it? I can't remember if you said
Lowes or Home Depot.

--
Rich

I'm also interested in drip irrigation systems, esp. hooked to rain
barrels. Any how-to appreciated, rain barrel or not.


At Lowes's - HD may have it also. Mister Landscaper is the brand.

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio... %20irrigation

No tools necessary except for a sharp knife. Well Maybe a large curved
jaw set of pliers for the ladies. There is a hole punching tool that
you buy to attach the drip lines to the main hose.

On Cary water pressure I needed the pressure regulator or else the drip
lines will keep blowing off. I like to keep mine plugged when not in
use to keep debris out of the line, so I had a lot of male hose ends
around since I kept all my repair stuff and had some old hoses. I plug
them with goop to make a solid plug. If you get trash in the main pipe
it will not go throught the emitters and you will have dickens of a time
keeping them dripping.

I suppose you could use rain barrels, but I don't know how much higher
than the hose they would have to be to work properly. I am doing this
to cut my water bill and be more efficient. I started last year doing
this and wish I had done it earlier since it is so easy to work with.
At first I thought well I will just make one with long enough emitter
tubing and that does not work. It is just too unwieldy. Much of mine
is on top of the ground, but I will probably cover most of it with mulch
and possibly bury it.

@www.spam.com is a garbage address.



--
Wes Dukes ([email protected]) Swap the . and the @ to email me please.

is a garbage address.
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Old 01-09-2006, 06:02 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 2
Default watering systems

if aesthetics matter, some sites sell nice wooden barrels.

http://www.kentuckybarrels.com/wholebarrels.html


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