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Old 02-07-2007, 08:37 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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Default small trees to identify

Would appreciate if some of the tree/shrub experts here would help
with identifying these small trees that have come up in a wooded area
in the back of our yard. We have seen these further back in the
woods, they don't seem to get real large, but they are trees.
These are currently about 6 feet tall, grey-brown smooth bark with a
sort of leathery green leaves.
I am going to take some of them out, but depending on what they are I
may keep one or two, or transplant them. They are deciduous.
Three photos here. Thanks

http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a84...ent=Tree-1.jpg

http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a84...ent=Tree-2.jpg

http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a84...e-leaves-1.jpg


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Old 02-07-2007, 11:43 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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Default small trees to identify

In article . com,
ncstockguy wrote:
Would appreciate if some of the tree/shrub experts here would help
with identifying these small trees that have come up in a wooded area
in the back of our yard.


It looks like Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata), also called
Silverberry. It is an invasive species and very difficult to get rid
of. You cut it back and it will just send up more shoots. The seeds get
spread by birds. It will grow up in to a thick, inpenetrable thicket.

Here are some more photos for comparison:

http://www.invasive.org/search/actio...1&results =39

(although the berries I've seen are more of a dark purple / black, not
the reddish shown in a couple of these photos).

--
Steve



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Old 03-07-2007, 03:52 AM posted to triangle.gardens
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Default small trees to identify

I agree, some type of eleagnus.
Eleagnus is sold at every nursery in the area and widely planted as a
screening material.
The small fruits are supposedly a good source of antioxidants, and the
flowers smell wonderful in the fall.
I've only seen reddish fruits (in January) on the nursery types. There
are several types, and I don't know if all are invasive or not.



On Jul 2, 2:37 pm, ncstockguy wrote:
Would appreciate if some of the tree/shrub experts here would help
with identifying these small trees that have come up in a wooded area
in the back of our yard. We have seen these further back in the
woods, they don't seem to get real large, but they are trees.
These are currently about 6 feet tall, grey-brown smooth bark with a
sort of leathery green leaves.
I am going to take some of them out, but depending on what they are I
may keep one or two, or transplant them. They are deciduous.
Three photos here. Thanks

http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a84...=view&current=...

http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a84...=view&current=...

http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a84...=view&current=...



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Old 03-07-2007, 11:53 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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Posts: 63
Default small trees to identify

Thanks, it look a lot like Autumn Olive. I'll research it some more
then do what needs doing....


On Jul 2, 5:43 pm, Steve wrote:
In article . com,

ncstockguy wrote:
Would appreciate if some of the tree/shrub experts here would help
with identifying these small trees that have come up in a wooded area
in the back of our yard.


It looks like Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata), also called
Silverberry. It is an invasive species and very difficult to get rid
of. You cut it back and it will just send up more shoots. The seeds get
spread by birds. It will grow up in to a thick, inpenetrable thicket.

Here are some more photos for comparison:

http://www.invasive.org/search/actio...0umbellata&Sta...

(although the berries I've seen are more of a dark purple / black, not
the reddish shown in a couple of these photos).

--
Steve




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Old 05-07-2007, 05:00 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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Posts: 10
Default small trees to identify

My 7 acre lot was completely covered with eleagnus. Mine is
deciduous, has reddish and yellow berries in the fall, and
good-smelling light yellow flowers in the spring. It is horribly
invasive. I have pulled hundred of them. Luckily they grow back
slowly, but this year there is a huge "bumper crop" of them coming
back all over. I have left one batch purposely as a privacy hedge,
and as long as you stay on top of it, it won't become invasive. Mine
had a 60 year start when I got the lot.
Kira


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Old 09-07-2007, 10:25 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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Default small trees to identify

I see some types have edible berries? Are yours edible? That will
probably enter into whether I take them all out and go looking to kill
more, or keep a few around.


On Jul 5, 11:00 am, !! (Kira Dirlik) wrote:
My 7 acre lot was completely covered with eleagnus. Mine is
deciduous, has reddish and yellow berries in the fall, and
good-smelling light yellow flowers in the spring. It is horribly
invasive. I have pulled hundred of them. Luckily they grow back
slowly, but this year there is a huge "bumper crop" of them coming
back all over. I have left one batch purposely as a privacy hedge,
and as long as you stay on top of it, it won't become invasive. Mine
had a 60 year start when I got the lot.
Kira



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Old 11-07-2007, 03:58 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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Default small trees to identify

They are edible, and my son likes them and makes a jam out of them,
but they are so small, it's not worth it. Their 2 weeks of delicious
smell in the Spring makes me keep some groves around. (Well, no way
to remove them all in our neighborhood, anyway.... thousands, no
exaggeration).
Kira

On Mon, 09 Jul 2007 13:25:20 -0700, ncstockguy
wrote:
I see some types have edible berries? Are yours edible? That will
probably enter into whether I take them all out and go looking to kill
more, or keep a few around.


On Jul 5, 11:00 am, !! (Kira Dirlik) wrote:
My 7 acre lot was completely covered with eleagnus. Mine is
deciduous, has reddish and yellow berries in the fall, and
good-smelling light yellow flowers in the spring. It is horribly
invasive. I have pulled hundred of them. Luckily they grow back
slowly, but this year there is a huge "bumper crop" of them coming
back all over. I have left one batch purposely as a privacy hedge,
and as long as you stay on top of it, it won't become invasive. Mine
had a 60 year start when I got the lot.
Kira




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Old 18-07-2007, 07:46 PM posted to triangle.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 63
Default small trees to identify

I may have found the mother plant of these eleagnus trees. It is now
covered with small pinkish-red berries. Does that sound like Autumn
Olive to you?
I hesitate to taste berries when not fairly sure of the species of
tree.




On Jul 11, 9:58 am, !! (Kira Dirlik) wrote:
They are edible, and my son likes them and makes a jam out of them,
but they are so small, it's not worth it. Their 2 weeks of delicious
smell in the Spring makes me keep some groves around. (Well, no way
to remove them all in our neighborhood, anyway.... thousands, no
exaggeration).
Kira

On Mon, 09 Jul 2007 13:25:20 -0700, ncstockguy
wrote:

I see some types have edible berries? Are yours edible? That will
probably enter into whether I take them all out and go looking to kill
more, or keep a few around.


On Jul 5, 11:00 am, !! (Kira Dirlik) wrote:
My 7 acre lot was completely covered with eleagnus. Mine is
deciduous, has reddish and yellow berries in the fall, and
good-smelling light yellow flowers in the spring. It is horribly
invasive. I have pulled hundred of them. Luckily they grow back
slowly, but this year there is a huge "bumper crop" of them coming
back all over. I have left one batch purposely as a privacy hedge,
and as long as you stay on top of it, it won't become invasive. Mine
had a 60 year start when I got the lot.
Kira





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