#1   Report Post  
Old 06-09-2009, 08:11 PM posted to triangle.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2008
Posts: 43
Default Artichokes

I have five artichoke plants in my container garden. The foliage is
lush, but no sign of any artichokes. I seem to recall reading that it
takes two years to form artichokes. Should I just let the plants
winter over and see what happens next year?

  #2   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2009, 10:14 PM posted to triangle.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2008
Posts: 164
Default Artichokes

On Sun, 06 Sep 2009 15:11:51 -0400 in Richard Evans wrote:
I have five artichoke plants in my container garden. The foliage is
lush, but no sign of any artichokes. I seem to recall reading that it
takes two years to form artichokes. Should I just let the plants
winter over and see what happens next year?


It's a perennial.
But appears to only be hardy to Zone 8a.
If you can plant them in the ground close to the house on a southern exposure
you probably won't need to do more than put a sheet over them on the coldest
nights this winter.
Otherwise, pull them inside just before the first night it's due to hit
25F.
--
Chris Dukes
  #3   Report Post  
Old 11-09-2009, 04:07 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2006
Location: Chalfont St Giles
Posts: 1,340
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by View Post
It's a perennial.
But appears to only be hardy to Zone 8a.
If you can plant them in the ground close to the house on a southern exposure
you probably won't need to do more than put a sheet over them on the coldest
nights this winter.
Otherwise, pull them inside just before the first night it's due to hit
25F.
--
Chris Dukes
What kind of artichokes are you growing?

If you are growing Jerusalem artichokes, and are looking in the roots for some tubers to eat, then you dug them up too early, they form in autumn. They are very hardy.

If you are growing globe artichokes, and are looking for a large thistle bud, then those should have started forming back in the spring ready for harvest from late spring through to autumn. If you planted a small plant this spring, you were probably too late to get any crop this year. From personal experience, they are hardier than Mr Dukes says. Wikipedia says zone 7. Since they are commonly grown in France and (less commonly) England, both now and in mediaeval times, that must be true.

If you have something that looks like a sunflower and are looking for something that looks like a globe artichoke growing on it, then you bought the wrong plant.
  #4   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2009, 08:50 PM posted to triangle.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2008
Posts: 43
Default Artichokes

echinosum wrote:

What kind of artichokes are you growing?

If you are growing Jerusalem artichokes, and are looking in the roots
for some tubers to eat, then you dug them up too early, they form in
autumn. They are very hardy.

If you are growing globe artichokes, and are looking for a large
thistle bud, then those should have started forming back in the spring
ready for harvest from late spring through to autumn. If you planted a
small plant this spring, you were probably too late to get any crop
this year. From personal experience, they are hardier than Mr Dukes
says. Wikipedia says zone 7. Since they are commonly grown in France
and (less commonly) England, both now and in mediaeval times, that must
be true.


The tag says Green Globe. The plants are clusters of thistle-like
leaves, sort of grayish green.


  #5   Report Post  
Old 14-09-2009, 08:55 AM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2006
Location: Chalfont St Giles
Posts: 1,340
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Evans View Post
The tag says Green Globe. The plants are clusters of thistle-like leaves, sort of grayish green.
Good, that's a globe artichoke. Probably it was too small to produce this year. It will probably die back over winter, shoot in the spring, and give you globes next year. A bit of fertilizer would help if you want some big ones. And keep an eye out for aphids, they can so completely infest a globle if you don't keep them under control that you wouldn't want to eat it.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Artichokes? Jan Flora Gardening 2 22-03-2003 10:56 PM
Have you ever grown Jerusalem Artichokes? Mike Davis Edible Gardening 7 13-03-2003 02:20 PM
Jerusalem Artichokes THECHILLIS United Kingdom 4 08-03-2003 09:27 PM
jerusalem artichokes Sue Chamberlain United Kingdom 6 22-02-2003 10:39 PM
Artichokes - What's in a name Dave Hunt United Kingdom 8 21-10-2002 09:38 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:04 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017