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Old 01-02-2005, 07:19 PM
Patskywriter
 
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First things first, build yourself a nice compost bin.

thanks, murri! believe it or not, i actually have TWO compost bins, even though
i don’t have a backyard garden yet! I also bought rain barrels for all our
gutters (5 in total). you can save a FORTUNE when you water your plants with
rainwater.

a friend of mine told me that cinder blocks would be better for the raised beds
that i'll be growing fruits and veggies in. pressure-treated wood leaches
harmful preservatives into the soil; conversely, cinder blocks leach a bit of
lime into the soil, which is fine by me. because i'm driving a dinky lil
plymouth, i'll buy a few cinder blocks every time i'm in the vicinity of lowe's
or home depot. by spring i should have enough for all my beds.

pat

  #17   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2005, 01:10 AM
Lady Blacksword
 
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I'm planing on brick or stone, but cinder block would work too. And the bit
about the lumber is true so far as I know. Besides, the lumber will decay
eventually, no matter what it's treated w/, or crack if it freezes when wet,
etc.......
Murri

"Patskywriter" wrote in message
...
First things first, build yourself a nice compost bin.

thanks, murri! believe it or not, i actually have TWO compost bins, even
though
i don't have a backyard garden yet! I also bought rain barrels for all our
gutters (5 in total). you can save a FORTUNE when you water your plants
with
rainwater.

a friend of mine told me that cinder blocks would be better for the raised
beds
that i'll be growing fruits and veggies in. pressure-treated wood leaches
harmful preservatives into the soil; conversely, cinder blocks leach a bit
of
lime into the soil, which is fine by me. because i'm driving a dinky lil
plymouth, i'll buy a few cinder blocks every time i'm in the vicinity of
lowe's
or home depot. by spring i should have enough for all my beds.

pat



  #18   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2005, 03:00 PM
Patskywriter
 
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omiGOD! i can't wait to start gardening--i haven't had a garden in FIVE
years!!! ahem 'scuze me, just had to get that out

pat
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Old 02-02-2005, 03:11 PM
Lady Blacksword
 
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*giggle* It's ok. Feel free to express yourself.
Murri

"Patskywriter" wrote in message
...
omiGOD! i can't wait to start gardening--i haven't had a garden in FIVE
years!!! ahem 'scuze me, just had to get that out

pat



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Old 03-02-2005, 07:08 PM
Patskywriter
 
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thanks for those links--i read the articles and decided that i'll stay with the
cinder blocks for fruits/veggies, but i won't hesitate to use treated lumber
for tropicals, flowers, etc.

i suppose it's almost time to get my seeds started. i have four minigreenhouses
at the side of the house and i'm anxiousl to get going! i have so many seeds i
might not have to buy so many plants this spring/summer! (although i did
promise a couple of buddies that we were going to visit big bloomers in april
or may.)

say, does anyone know anything about growing scuppernongs? i never even heard
of 'em before i moved here (durham), but i'm thinking maybe i should make a go
at growing them. i wonder how many years it takes for the vines to bear fruit
....?

pat


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Old 04-02-2005, 08:16 AM
Lady Blacksword
 
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Scuppernongs are a native grape. Check out the Biltmore Estate Winery
website for info. And try googling for it.
Remember though, Pat, that native varieties of grape tend to grow faster in
their natural areas, so consider carefully where you put it, as you can only
trim a grape vine back so far before you make it susceptible to disease and
insects. My fiance warns: "Once encouraged and growing, you may not have a
fruiting plant, but you will have lots of plant."
Note: Scuppernongs do not always fruit as regularly as some other grapes. If
you want a light grape with sweet flavor, seeds, and thick insect resistant
skins, you could try a "pineapple" muscadine (one variety, there are
actually quite a number of sweet white muscadines). It's just as tasty, but
more manageable for someone who's never grown grapes.
The best thing, however, would be to have a long conversation with someone
who has grown a wide variety of grapes in this area.

Murri

"Patskywriter" wrote in message
...
thanks for those links--i read the articles and decided that i'll stay
with the
cinder blocks for fruits/veggies, but i won't hesitate to use treated
lumber
for tropicals, flowers, etc.

i suppose it's almost time to get my seeds started. i have four
minigreenhouses
at the side of the house and i'm anxiousl to get going! i have so many
seeds i
might not have to buy so many plants this spring/summer! (although i did
promise a couple of buddies that we were going to visit big bloomers in
april
or may.)

say, does anyone know anything about growing scuppernongs? i never even
heard
of 'em before i moved here (durham), but i'm thinking maybe i should make
a go
at growing them. i wonder how many years it takes for the vines to bear
fruit
...?

pat



  #22   Report Post  
Old 04-02-2005, 10:24 AM
Patskywriter
 
Posts: n/a
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whoa! thanks for the info on scuppernongs/muscadines, murri! i've got some
studying to do!

in the meantime, i'll plan to set up my new garden with peas, beans, tomatoes,
cucumbers, and raspberries ... and in the back part of the yard dwarf fruit
trees—peaches, apples, and plums

pat
  #23   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 05:29 PM
Brian G
 
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I've noticed some cinderblock edging at the Arboretum. They had actually
filled the "holes" with soil & planted various creeping plants to improve
the appearance of the block. Clever folks...

Brian
"Patskywriter" wrote in message
...
thanks for those links--i read the articles and decided that i'll stay
with the
cinder blocks for fruits/veggies, but i won't hesitate to use treated
lumber
for tropicals, flowers, etc.

i suppose it's almost time to get my seeds started. i have four
minigreenhouses
at the side of the house and i'm anxiousl to get going! i have so many
seeds i
might not have to buy so many plants this spring/summer! (although i did
promise a couple of buddies that we were going to visit big bloomers in
april
or may.)

say, does anyone know anything about growing scuppernongs? i never even
heard
of 'em before i moved here (durham), but i'm thinking maybe i should make
a go
at growing them. i wonder how many years it takes for the vines to bear
fruit
...?

pat



  #24   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2005, 01:02 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 2005-02-08, Brian G wrote:
I've noticed some cinderblock edging at the Arboretum. They had actually
filled the "holes" with soil & planted various creeping plants to improve
the appearance of the block. Clever folks...


The probably copied me. I have had some like that for 20 years. :-)

They are quite porus and will dryout fast if toomuch is left above the
ground.

Brian
"Patskywriter" wrote in message
...
thanks for those links--i read the articles and decided that i'll stay
with the
cinder blocks for fruits/veggies, but i won't hesitate to use treated
lumber
for tropicals, flowers, etc.

i suppose it's almost time to get my seeds started. i have four
minigreenhouses
at the side of the house and i'm anxiousl to get going! i have so many
seeds i
might not have to buy so many plants this spring/summer! (although i did
promise a couple of buddies that we were going to visit big bloomers in
april
or may.)

say, does anyone know anything about growing scuppernongs? i never even
heard
of 'em before i moved here (durham), but i'm thinking maybe i should make
a go
at growing them. i wonder how many years it takes for the vines to bear
fruit
...?

pat





--
Wes Dukes ([email protected]) Swap the . and the @ to email me please.

is a garbage address.


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