Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2006, 02:45 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
Ray
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

Looking for opinions, science, and/or anecdotal evidence:

(Disregarding the obvious situation in which the light intensity is so great
that pant tissues are burned)

Is it possible to give a plant too much light?

It is well established that too little light will lead to slower growth,
more "leggy" growth, and less blooming, and I have frequently heard that
plants should be grown as bright as possible without damaging them, but is
that really good advice? Are there cases where plants grow better in more
subdued lighting? If so, which, and why is that?

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!




  #2   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2006, 04:03 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
Kenni Judd
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

I've seen some that have better flower color when grown a little shadier --
Epc. Frances Dyer, for one. Kenni

"Ray" wrote in message
. ..
Looking for opinions, science, and/or anecdotal evidence:

(Disregarding the obvious situation in which the light intensity is so
great that pant tissues are burned)

Is it possible to give a plant too much light?

It is well established that too little light will lead to slower growth,
more "leggy" growth, and less blooming, and I have frequently heard that
plants should be grown as bright as possible without damaging them, but is
that really good advice? Are there cases where plants grow better in more
subdued lighting? If so, which, and why is that?

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!





  #3   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2006, 05:07 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
K Barrett
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

Yes, it is possible to give a plant too much light. Physically, not only
can one burn the leaves (since light is heat) but on a chemical basis the
ring structure of chlorophyll gets damaged when bombarded with too much
light. (all those double bonds get broken, irreparably) Plants then turn
that sickly light green and die.

I have noticed that in too much light the inflorescence doesn't elongate
properly and flowers are crowded on a stem. Which then makes me wonder
about how to detrermine the proper amount of light and my head swims and I
come back to the computer and read my silly murder mystery newsgroup. Or
watch TV.

If you ever really wanted to read up on photosynthesis the University of
Arizona has a marvelous photosynthesis page with great links to follow.
Googling terms lead to some great papers, too. Dr Wang's research on phal
production has a lot of science on proper light levels. To blow my own horn
I'll provide the link to Dr Wang's papers via OrchidSafari, *G*
http://www.geocities.com/brassia.geo/OSTA.html

K Barrett


"Ray" wrote in message
. ..
Looking for opinions, science, and/or anecdotal evidence:

(Disregarding the obvious situation in which the light intensity is so
great that pant tissues are burned)

Is it possible to give a plant too much light?

It is well established that too little light will lead to slower growth,
more "leggy" growth, and less blooming, and I have frequently heard that
plants should be grown as bright as possible without damaging them, but is
that really good advice? Are there cases where plants grow better in more
subdued lighting? If so, which, and why is that?

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!





  #4   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2006, 11:33 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
Jack
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

Ok. my head hurts
On the stupid side, If it blooms and doen't die will that work?

Jack

  #5   Report Post  
Old 26-03-2006, 11:50 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
Ray
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

Do you think you could actually tell us WHERE Dr. Wang's papers are on that
long list?

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!


"K Barrett" wrote in message
. ..
Yes, it is possible to give a plant too much light. Physically, not only
can one burn the leaves (since light is heat) but on a chemical basis the
ring structure of chlorophyll gets damaged when bombarded with too much
light. (all those double bonds get broken, irreparably) Plants then turn
that sickly light green and die.

I have noticed that in too much light the inflorescence doesn't elongate
properly and flowers are crowded on a stem. Which then makes me wonder
about how to detrermine the proper amount of light and my head swims and I
come back to the computer and read my silly murder mystery newsgroup. Or
watch TV.

If you ever really wanted to read up on photosynthesis the University of
Arizona has a marvelous photosynthesis page with great links to follow.
Googling terms lead to some great papers, too. Dr Wang's research on phal
production has a lot of science on proper light levels. To blow my own
horn I'll provide the link to Dr Wang's papers via OrchidSafari, *G*
http://www.geocities.com/brassia.geo/OSTA.html

K Barrett


"Ray" wrote in message
. ..
Looking for opinions, science, and/or anecdotal evidence:

(Disregarding the obvious situation in which the light intensity is so
great that pant tissues are burned)

Is it possible to give a plant too much light?

It is well established that too little light will lead to slower growth,
more "leggy" growth, and less blooming, and I have frequently heard that
plants should be grown as bright as possible without damaging them, but
is that really good advice? Are there cases where plants grow better in
more subdued lighting? If so, which, and why is that?

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!









  #6   Report Post  
Old 27-03-2006, 12:02 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
Jack
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

It's about half way down
here is the paper

http://primera.tamu.edu/orchids/paper2pg1.htm

If you grow Phals it would be very helpful on bloom stagering from the
same crop

Jack

  #7   Report Post  
Old 27-03-2006, 05:21 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
K Barrett
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

LOL! Where it says
"Articles by Dr. Yin-Tung Wang of Texas A&M click here "

K



"Ray" wrote in message
. ..
Do you think you could actually tell us WHERE Dr. Wang's papers are on
that long list?

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!


"K Barrett" wrote in message
. ..
Yes, it is possible to give a plant too much light. Physically, not only
can one burn the leaves (since light is heat) but on a chemical basis the
ring structure of chlorophyll gets damaged when bombarded with too much
light. (all those double bonds get broken, irreparably) Plants then turn
that sickly light green and die.

I have noticed that in too much light the inflorescence doesn't elongate
properly and flowers are crowded on a stem. Which then makes me wonder
about how to detrermine the proper amount of light and my head swims and
I come back to the computer and read my silly murder mystery newsgroup.
Or watch TV.

If you ever really wanted to read up on photosynthesis the University of
Arizona has a marvelous photosynthesis page with great links to follow.
Googling terms lead to some great papers, too. Dr Wang's research on
phal production has a lot of science on proper light levels. To blow my
own horn I'll provide the link to Dr Wang's papers via OrchidSafari, *G*
http://www.geocities.com/brassia.geo/OSTA.html

K Barrett


"Ray" wrote in message
. ..
Looking for opinions, science, and/or anecdotal evidence:

(Disregarding the obvious situation in which the light intensity is so
great that pant tissues are burned)

Is it possible to give a plant too much light?

It is well established that too little light will lead to slower growth,
more "leggy" growth, and less blooming, and I have frequently heard that
plants should be grown as bright as possible without damaging them, but
is that really good advice? Are there cases where plants grow better in
more subdued lighting? If so, which, and why is that?

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!









  #8   Report Post  
Old 27-03-2006, 10:00 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
?
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

On Sun, 26 Mar 2006 08:45:09 -0500 in Ray wrote:
Looking for opinions, science, and/or anecdotal evidence:

(Disregarding the obvious situation in which the light intensity is so great
that pant tissues are burned)

Is it possible to give a plant too much light?

It is well established that too little light will lead to slower growth,
more "leggy" growth, and less blooming, and I have frequently heard that
plants should be grown as bright as possible without damaging them, but is
that really good advice? Are there cases where plants grow better in more
subdued lighting? If so, which, and why is that?


I can offer one counter example.
Ludisia grown as bright as possible without damage turns an ugly (to me)
orange color.


--
Chris Dukes
Suspicion breeds confidence -- Brazil
  #9   Report Post  
Old 28-03-2006, 07:58 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
jtill
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

Ray, my plants are outside so I try to place them so that they get
morning sun and mottled shade in the afternoon. I am to new at this to
have any information you could use. But, this seemed to be a chance to
ask about street lights. Are stray lights a problem for day length
controlled plants?
Joe T

  #10   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2006, 12:42 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
Ray
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

Of course they can be, but if you consider the inverse-square rule, at any
appreciable distance, the light intensity is next to nothing, so I really
have my doubts that it would be an issue.

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!


"jtill" wrote in message
ups.com...
Ray, my plants are outside so I try to place them so that they get
morning sun and mottled shade in the afternoon. I am to new at this to
have any information you could use. But, this seemed to be a chance to
ask about street lights. Are stray lights a problem for day length
controlled plants?
Joe T





  #11   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2006, 08:15 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
?
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

On 28 Mar 2006 10:58:45 -0800 in . com jtill wrote:
Ray, my plants are outside so I try to place them so that they get
morning sun and mottled shade in the afternoon. I am to new at this to
have any information you could use. But, this seemed to be a chance to
ask about street lights. Are stray lights a problem for day length
controlled plants?


I've only seen literature on street lights having an effect on zygo-cacti.
Ray makes a good point about inverse square law quickly bringing the
effective light level to nill.
However, on nights with scattered low clouds , the bank of street lights
2 miles north of me produces entirely too much light in my yard for
stargazing to the south. And then there was the apartment I was in where
the bedroom window was about 10 feet away from the bulb from the street
light.
What I'm trying to say, is you need to indicate if you have a pathological
case with the street light illumination.


--
Chris Dukes
Suspicion breeds confidence -- Brazil
  #12   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2006, 09:36 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
K Barrett
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

Try http://www.orchidtrek.com/rotor/photperiod.html
and the rest of Rotor's articles.
http://www.geocities.com/brassia.geo/OSTA.html

K Barrett

"?" wrote in message
rg...
On 28 Mar 2006 10:58:45 -0800 in
. com jtill
wrote:
Ray, my plants are outside so I try to place them so that they get
morning sun and mottled shade in the afternoon. I am to new at this to
have any information you could use. But, this seemed to be a chance to
ask about street lights. Are stray lights a problem for day length
controlled plants?


I've only seen literature on street lights having an effect on zygo-cacti.
Ray makes a good point about inverse square law quickly bringing the
effective light level to nill.
However, on nights with scattered low clouds , the bank of street lights
2 miles north of me produces entirely too much light in my yard for
stargazing to the south. And then there was the apartment I was in where
the bedroom window was about 10 feet away from the bulb from the street
light.
What I'm trying to say, is you need to indicate if you have a pathological
case with the street light illumination.


--
Chris Dukes
Suspicion breeds confidence -- Brazil



  #13   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2006, 10:11 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
Ray
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

I suspect that the human eye is far more capable of detecting light than is
a plant.

If the two were close in sensitivity, stars would prevent plants from
blooming!

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!


"?" wrote in message
rg...
On 28 Mar 2006 10:58:45 -0800 in
. com jtill
wrote:
Ray, my plants are outside so I try to place them so that they get
morning sun and mottled shade in the afternoon. I am to new at this to
have any information you could use. But, this seemed to be a chance to
ask about street lights. Are stray lights a problem for day length
controlled plants?


I've only seen literature on street lights having an effect on zygo-cacti.
Ray makes a good point about inverse square law quickly bringing the
effective light level to nill.
However, on nights with scattered low clouds , the bank of street lights
2 miles north of me produces entirely too much light in my yard for
stargazing to the south. And then there was the apartment I was in where
the bedroom window was about 10 feet away from the bulb from the street
light.
What I'm trying to say, is you need to indicate if you have a pathological
case with the street light illumination.


--
Chris Dukes
Suspicion breeds confidence -- Brazil



  #14   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2006, 10:19 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
Ray
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

I really don't think the photoperiodicity plays a role in my original query.
Sure, we interpret "x" hours of light and "y" hours of dark, but to the
plant, do we really know when that break occurs?

In any case where the plants are exposed to a gradual decrease in light
intensity, it seems likely that there is some point at which the plant - for
all practical purposes - "thinks" it's dark, while to us it may be a long
way off. If we put the opaque covering of Dr. Rotor's article on before
that point, yes we have shortened the day length, but if it's afterwards,
the true day length - to the plant - is actually shorter.

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Artwork, Books and Lots of Free Info!


"K Barrett" wrote in message
...
Try http://www.orchidtrek.com/rotor/photperiod.html
and the rest of Rotor's articles.
http://www.geocities.com/brassia.geo/OSTA.html

K Barrett

"?" wrote in message
rg...
On 28 Mar 2006 10:58:45 -0800 in
. com jtill
wrote:
Ray, my plants are outside so I try to place them so that they get
morning sun and mottled shade in the afternoon. I am to new at this to
have any information you could use. But, this seemed to be a chance to
ask about street lights. Are stray lights a problem for day length
controlled plants?


I've only seen literature on street lights having an effect on
zygo-cacti.
Ray makes a good point about inverse square law quickly bringing the
effective light level to nill.
However, on nights with scattered low clouds , the bank of street lights
2 miles north of me produces entirely too much light in my yard for
stargazing to the south. And then there was the apartment I was in where
the bedroom window was about 10 feet away from the bulb from the street
light.
What I'm trying to say, is you need to indicate if you have a
pathological
case with the street light illumination.


--
Chris Dukes
Suspicion breeds confidence -- Brazil





  #15   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2006, 01:56 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
jtill
 
Posts: n/a
Default General question about light

I have only slowly got my act somewhat together on this orchid thing.
Probably will ask other question as time goes along. Because it is easy
here in the Houston/Galveston to use my yard for orchids only small
problems crop up. The street light worried me so thanks for discussing
that.To much light? I will let you know since mine get a lot of it. I
burned a Cattleya pretty bad last summer in what I thought was mottled
shade under a Pecan tree. Well. I was blocking the morning sun and not
the afternoon! Small problem right? HA! It is a little tricky to find
that spot in my yard that has the right lighting, in winter for sure
without the leaves. First I am working on growth, later blooming will
be cultivated. That Cattleya I sunburned did bloom this winter, burn
and all!
Ray, all the plants I buy seem to have rotten roots. Your SemiHydro
sure is looking better all the time. In a clay pot and saucer even the
pot gets into the act providing a wall of dampness around the root
system.



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
General garden question RobertFaa Gardening 4 29-04-2011 11:18 PM
Outside light question. Dont flame me the light will be in the garden :-) [email protected] United Kingdom 8 09-04-2011 04:56 PM
General plant keeping question Bruce Abrams Freshwater Aquaria Plants 4 31-12-2003 12:42 AM
Greenhouses - general question Paul United Kingdom 2 29-09-2003 02:12 PM
General question on perrenial seed starting... Kevin Miller Gardening 5 06-03-2003 07:27 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:34 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017