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Old 16-11-2007, 12:58 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
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Default Growing Phals & Cats

I live in So Cal and am familiar with growing cymbidiums. They grow fine
outside with just fertilizer and water.

I want to learn to grow phals and catleyas and realize they need a more
humid and possibly warmer environment.

A) I can grow them outside during most of the year and have them get plenty
of heat and light. Humidity is low however.

B) I can grow them in the house, in their own room. I can humidify the room
and control the temperature, but sufficient light is lacking. An electric
grow light could be used to provide the light and it would be on a timer..

Would I be successful with A or do I really need B. If I do B, how well
does the artificial light work.

An outdoor greenhouse is not really a possibility as I have shade trees all
over my yard and it is hard to find spots with sufficient sunlight.

Thanks for replies. This is a great hobby and keeps my out of the bars.

Vito




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Old 16-11-2007, 05:55 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,344
Default Growing Phals & Cats

"Uncle_vito" wrote in message
...
I live in So Cal and am familiar with growing cymbidiums. They grow fine
outside with just fertilizer and water.

I want to learn to grow phals and catleyas and realize they need a more
humid and possibly warmer environment.

A) I can grow them outside during most of the year and have them get
plenty of heat and light. Humidity is low however.



Uncle Vito, is there any way you can take a nice weekend drive up the coast
to Santa Barbara and see how the Santa Barbara Orchid Estate grows their
Laelia purpuratas outdoors under shade cloth only? Included in this group
would also be Laelia tenebrosa, a gorgeous flower and one of my favotites.
Also there are any number of Laelia anceps that grow outdoors, too. The
reason why I say you should see it is becasue there's no substitute for a
good look around up there. The place is phenomenal.

If, however that's just too far to go, Andy's Orchids (ack I forget where
they are located, but in the greater northern San Diego area) may be closer
to you. He too grows outside. (most of his orchids are mounted, and may be
a bit difficult to grow.... I should say I have a hard time with them).
Again, the ability to talk with some of the growers/workers is what's needed
to see how they tweak their growing conditions.

Santa Barbara Orchid Estate, for example, has started growing their
purpuratas mounted or in 1 gallon pots filled with a scant amount of granite
gravel (like what you infill around drainage pipes with.) I mean *what?!*
Where'd *that* idea come from??? But I've tried it too with some success,
and as long as the plants are where a mister comes on they have even grown
in my conditions..... so if at all possible go and look. So just like with
your cymbidiums, a bit of shade, a bit of moisture from overhead mister
(like what they use at Home Depot to cool the doorways sometimes (have you
ever hseen them do that?) and some of these beauties can be grown outdoors
too.


B) I can grow them in the house, in their own room. I can humidify the
room and control the temperature, but sufficient light is lacking. An
electric grow light could be used to provide the light and it would be on
a timer..

Would I be successful with A or do I really need B. If I do B, how well
does the artificial light work.

An outdoor greenhouse is not really a possibility as I have shade trees
all over my yard and it is hard to find spots with sufficient sunlight.


You may be able to grow Lycastes out there in teh dappled shade.... There
was a woand here who grew the most wonderful lycastes out in her yard, under
the trees, where the sprinklers hit them (in teak baskets) with granular
pelleted fertilizer (Dynamite or something similar) as fertilizer.. Of
course you have to rememebr you'll kill a few plants untill you figure it
out, but I'd be tempted to try.

The Santa Barbara Orchid Estate page used to have a list of hardy orchids
that could be grown outside but I couldn't find it on their page anymore....
blast. Nevertheless I found this one: http://www.sborchid.com/culture.php

I live in N Calif, near Walnut Creek. We've been trying to involve our
society in finding little niches where orchids can be grown outside without
a greenhouse. Greenhouses can be a real expense to maintain. If you've been
following the thread on heating a GH in winter you'll see what I mean. We
here in Calif are blessed with marvelous weather, and many orchids will be
happy to find a home if we can pick the right one for the right spot. And
that's the trick. But be willing to kill a few in the learning! I should
show you my 4" pot crammed full with name tags of orchids I've killed in
learning how/what I can grow. Remember, its the learning that keeps
Alzheimer's at bay.

I hope this helps.

K Barrett




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Old 17-11-2007, 12:27 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Oct 2007
Posts: 49
Default Growing Phals & Cats

Thanks for the reply. I have been to SBOE sever times. One of my favorite
places. I have not closely observed where the Laelia tenebrosa grow. I
have only recently been involved with Phals and Cats. In the past I was
looking at the cymbidiums. I will be more observant next time I go. I do
know that the SBOE does have many greenhouses. SBOE is blessed with being
near the ocean with hi morning moisture and cool breazes.

I live in Walnut in So Cal. My uncle used to live in Walnut Creek and we
both have similar climates. Hot and dry winds can be present and I know to
watch out for those.

Thanks for letting me know your luck about growing outside. I am encouraged
to keep it up outside.

Vito

"K Barrett" wrote in message
. ..
"Uncle_vito" wrote in message
...
I live in So Cal and am familiar with growing cymbidiums. They grow fine
outside with just fertilizer and water.

I want to learn to grow phals and catleyas and realize they need a more
humid and possibly warmer environment.

A) I can grow them outside during most of the year and have them get
plenty of heat and light. Humidity is low however.



Uncle Vito, is there any way you can take a nice weekend drive up the
coast to Santa Barbara and see how the Santa Barbara Orchid Estate grows
their Laelia purpuratas outdoors under shade cloth only? Included in this
group would also be Laelia tenebrosa, a gorgeous flower and one of my
favotites. Also there are any number of Laelia anceps that grow outdoors,
too. The reason why I say you should see it is becasue there's no
substitute for a good look around up there. The place is phenomenal.

If, however that's just too far to go, Andy's Orchids (ack I forget where
they are located, but in the greater northern San Diego area) may be
closer to you. He too grows outside. (most of his orchids are mounted,
and may be a bit difficult to grow.... I should say I have a hard time
with them). Again, the ability to talk with some of the growers/workers is
what's needed to see how they tweak their growing conditions.

Santa Barbara Orchid Estate, for example, has started growing their
purpuratas mounted or in 1 gallon pots filled with a scant amount of
granite gravel (like what you infill around drainage pipes with.) I mean
*what?!* Where'd *that* idea come from??? But I've tried it too with some
success, and as long as the plants are where a mister comes on they have
even grown in my conditions..... so if at all possible go and look. So
just like with your cymbidiums, a bit of shade, a bit of moisture from
overhead mister (like what they use at Home Depot to cool the doorways
sometimes (have you ever hseen them do that?) and some of these beauties
can be grown outdoors too.


B) I can grow them in the house, in their own room. I can humidify the
room and control the temperature, but sufficient light is lacking. An
electric grow light could be used to provide the light and it would be on
a timer..

Would I be successful with A or do I really need B. If I do B, how well
does the artificial light work.

An outdoor greenhouse is not really a possibility as I have shade trees
all over my yard and it is hard to find spots with sufficient sunlight.


You may be able to grow Lycastes out there in teh dappled shade.... There
was a woand here who grew the most wonderful lycastes out in her yard,
under the trees, where the sprinklers hit them (in teak baskets) with
granular pelleted fertilizer (Dynamite or something similar) as
fertilizer.. Of course you have to rememebr you'll kill a few plants
untill you figure it out, but I'd be tempted to try.

The Santa Barbara Orchid Estate page used to have a list of hardy orchids
that could be grown outside but I couldn't find it on their page
anymore.... blast. Nevertheless I found this one:
http://www.sborchid.com/culture.php

I live in N Calif, near Walnut Creek. We've been trying to involve our
society in finding little niches where orchids can be grown outside
without a greenhouse. Greenhouses can be a real expense to maintain. If
you've been following the thread on heating a GH in winter you'll see what
I mean. We here in Calif are blessed with marvelous weather, and many
orchids will be happy to find a home if we can pick the right one for the
right spot. And that's the trick. But be willing to kill a few in the
learning! I should show you my 4" pot crammed full with name tags of
orchids I've killed in learning how/what I can grow. Remember, its the
learning that keeps Alzheimer's at bay.

I hope this helps.

K Barrett






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Old 17-11-2007, 06:19 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,344
Default Growing Phals & Cats

I think the key is to find the right shade and the right sprinkler
situation. A friend of mine grows Masdevallia coccinea on his front
stoop. Its properly shaded and the concrete patio is enough of a cool
sink that it cools the highs and lows of the ambient heat. Another
friend has a side yard that she damps down daily and grows bonsai as
well as some orchids (purpuratas) So you never can tell.

K Barrett


Uncle_vito wrote:
Thanks for the reply. I have been to SBOE sever times. One of my favorite
places. I have not closely observed where the Laelia tenebrosa grow. I
have only recently been involved with Phals and Cats. In the past I was
looking at the cymbidiums. I will be more observant next time I go. I do
know that the SBOE does have many greenhouses. SBOE is blessed with being
near the ocean with hi morning moisture and cool breazes.

I live in Walnut in So Cal. My uncle used to live in Walnut Creek and we
both have similar climates. Hot and dry winds can be present and I know to
watch out for those.

Thanks for letting me know your luck about growing outside. I am encouraged
to keep it up outside.

Vito

"K Barrett" wrote in message
. ..
"Uncle_vito" wrote in message
...
I live in So Cal and am familiar with growing cymbidiums. They grow fine
outside with just fertilizer and water.

I want to learn to grow phals and catleyas and realize they need a more
humid and possibly warmer environment.

A) I can grow them outside during most of the year and have them get
plenty of heat and light. Humidity is low however.


Uncle Vito, is there any way you can take a nice weekend drive up the
coast to Santa Barbara and see how the Santa Barbara Orchid Estate grows
their Laelia purpuratas outdoors under shade cloth only? Included in this
group would also be Laelia tenebrosa, a gorgeous flower and one of my
favotites. Also there are any number of Laelia anceps that grow outdoors,
too. The reason why I say you should see it is becasue there's no
substitute for a good look around up there. The place is phenomenal.

If, however that's just too far to go, Andy's Orchids (ack I forget where
they are located, but in the greater northern San Diego area) may be
closer to you. He too grows outside. (most of his orchids are mounted,
and may be a bit difficult to grow.... I should say I have a hard time
with them). Again, the ability to talk with some of the growers/workers is
what's needed to see how they tweak their growing conditions.

Santa Barbara Orchid Estate, for example, has started growing their
purpuratas mounted or in 1 gallon pots filled with a scant amount of
granite gravel (like what you infill around drainage pipes with.) I mean
*what?!* Where'd *that* idea come from??? But I've tried it too with some
success, and as long as the plants are where a mister comes on they have
even grown in my conditions..... so if at all possible go and look. So
just like with your cymbidiums, a bit of shade, a bit of moisture from
overhead mister (like what they use at Home Depot to cool the doorways
sometimes (have you ever hseen them do that?) and some of these beauties
can be grown outdoors too.

B) I can grow them in the house, in their own room. I can humidify the
room and control the temperature, but sufficient light is lacking. An
electric grow light could be used to provide the light and it would be on
a timer..

Would I be successful with A or do I really need B. If I do B, how well
does the artificial light work.

An outdoor greenhouse is not really a possibility as I have shade trees
all over my yard and it is hard to find spots with sufficient sunlight.

You may be able to grow Lycastes out there in teh dappled shade.... There
was a woand here who grew the most wonderful lycastes out in her yard,
under the trees, where the sprinklers hit them (in teak baskets) with
granular pelleted fertilizer (Dynamite or something similar) as
fertilizer.. Of course you have to rememebr you'll kill a few plants
untill you figure it out, but I'd be tempted to try.

The Santa Barbara Orchid Estate page used to have a list of hardy orchids
that could be grown outside but I couldn't find it on their page
anymore.... blast. Nevertheless I found this one:
http://www.sborchid.com/culture.php

I live in N Calif, near Walnut Creek. We've been trying to involve our
society in finding little niches where orchids can be grown outside
without a greenhouse. Greenhouses can be a real expense to maintain. If
you've been following the thread on heating a GH in winter you'll see what
I mean. We here in Calif are blessed with marvelous weather, and many
orchids will be happy to find a home if we can pick the right one for the
right spot. And that's the trick. But be willing to kill a few in the
learning! I should show you my 4" pot crammed full with name tags of
orchids I've killed in learning how/what I can grow. Remember, its the
learning that keeps Alzheimer's at bay.

I hope this helps.

K Barrett






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Old 18-11-2007, 12:11 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 158
Default Growing Phals & Cats

I think you can grow outside for most of the year, if you are willing to
compensate for low humidity by more frequent watering. [Some people avoid
that with a wetter potting mix, perhaps you could too, but it's never worked
for me.] For winter:

Phals don't need a whole lot of light (although a windowless room would
indeed be too dark). Many but by no means all Catts will also adjust to
less than optimal light within a couple years, at least enough to bloom, if
not quite as profusely as they might otherwise do. But since you are going
to have to have them inside for at least part of the year regardless, the
grow light would be a plus during that time. Good growing, Kenni

"Uncle_vito" wrote in message
...
I live in So Cal and am familiar with growing cymbidiums. They grow fine
outside with just fertilizer and water.

I want to learn to grow phals and catleyas and realize they need a more
humid and possibly warmer environment.

A) I can grow them outside during most of the year and have them get
plenty of heat and light. Humidity is low however.

B) I can grow them in the house, in their own room. I can humidify the
room and control the temperature, but sufficient light is lacking. An
electric grow light could be used to provide the light and it would be on
a timer..

Would I be successful with A or do I really need B. If I do B, how well
does the artificial light work.

An outdoor greenhouse is not really a possibility as I have shade trees
all over my yard and it is hard to find spots with sufficient sunlight.

Thanks for replies. This is a great hobby and keeps my out of the bars.

Vito






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