#1   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2010, 05:34 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 297
Default Bee orchids

Interesting research about Bee orchids

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8632814.stm

Steve

--
Neural Planner Software Ltd www.NPSL1.com
EasyNN-plus. Neural Networks plus. www.easynn.com
SwingNN. Forecast with Neural Networks. www.swingnn.com
JustNN. Just Neural Networks. www.justnn.com

  #2   Report Post  
Old 07-05-2010, 12:48 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2010
Posts: 29
Default

very interesting it is ... !i got information from it .. thanks so much !
__________________
vegetable garden
  #3   Report Post  
Old 10-06-2010, 09:06 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 24
Default Bee orchids

The issue is more complex than presented and may be just a case of
falce assumptions. According to the only robust monograph of Ophrys
(Pedersen and Faurholdt, 2007, Ophrys, the bee orchids of Europe, Kew
Publishing) O. arachnitiformis is a hybrid between O. sphegodes and .
fuciflora. Thus, it s reproductive pattern is hard to predict, since
Ophrys species tend to be particular in their hybridisation. Also, O.
lupercalis is treated as synonym of O. fusca ssp. fusca.
The issue is that even individual plants in one population may have
different odours, in order for the pollinator to be missled and not
get to know he is not going to have any reward from visiting that
particular odour-signature. When I read the article, I ll make more
comments of course.

On May 7, 7:48*am, ezylala wrote:
very interesting it is ... !i got information from it .. thanks so much
!

--
ezylala


  #4   Report Post  
Old 07-01-2011, 06:10 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 4
Default

The bee orchid is a native plant growing in pastures, field borders, banks and thickets of dry gypsum or limestone soils. It often occurs in undisturbed soil and prefers open or slightly shaded places. Bee Orchids flower between June and July. They are usually between 2 and 5 flowers that grow from each other in a head-like tip. The bee orchid is named after the shape of flowers. Each flower has three erect pink sepals, two small green petals and lip, which is yellow and brown with a velvety texture. Although it seems a bee should not be used as the main method of pollination is the usual form of self-pollination. bee orchid reach between 15 and 40 cm in height. The light green leaves have no stalk and are oval to oblong.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bee: - bee-on-zinnia-3_2005.jpg (1/1) Donn Thorson Garden Photos 0 25-03-2009 08:50 AM
Bee: - bee-on-zinnia-2_2005.jpg (1/1) Donn Thorson Garden Photos 1 25-03-2009 08:48 AM
Clematis with Halictid Bee - Clematis with Halictid Bee.jpg (1/1) Dave Fouchey Garden Photos 0 23-04-2007 12:00 AM
Clematis with Halictid Bee - Clematis with Halictid Bee.jpg (0/1) Dave Fouchey Garden Photos 0 23-04-2007 12:00 AM
Bee-zarre Bee-haviour Chookie Australia 4 15-01-2005 11:59 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:20 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017