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Old 09-10-2011, 05:16 PM
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Default Bee Orchids

We have bee Orchids growing in our field and have flowered.
They have finished now and we want to cut the field but a farmer said if we do we will kill the Orchids?
Any ideas what to do?

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Old 10-10-2011, 06:50 PM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
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Default Bee Orchids

On 10/9/2011 10:16 AM, James Holden wrote:
We have bee Orchids growing in our field and have flowered.
They have finished now and we want to cut the field but a farmer said if
we do we will kill the Orchids?
Any ideas what to do?






In some countries, the Bee Orchid has protected status. If that is your
case, you will have to follow the prescribed rules. If not, and you
would like to keep them, just transplant to an area that you will not be
cutting and enjoy them!

--

Ray
+++++++++++++++++++++++
www.CompressorStuff.com
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Old 11-10-2011, 02:56 AM posted to rec.gardens.orchids
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Default Bee Orchids

On 10/9/2011 12:16 PM, James Holden wrote:
We have bee Orchids growing in our field and have flowered.
They have finished now and we want to cut the field but a farmer said if
we do we will kill the Orchids?
Any ideas what to do?




Wait until the orchid leaves are starting to yellow and die for the year
and them mow.

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Old 24-11-2011, 12:47 PM
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[quote='Steve[_2_];939270']On 10/9/2011 12:16 PM, James Holden wrote:
We have bee Orchids growing in our field and have flowered.
They have finished now and we want to cut the field but a farmer said if
we do we will kill the Orchids?
Any ideas what to do?



Britain's wild orchids are fascinating and elusive. The Bee Orchid can be thick on the ground one year, absent entirely the next and just one or two the year after. They are perennials though, but just have dormant years. They need to attract bumble bees for pollination, but then the seeds are like dust and carry no food. So the seeds blow away and when they settle, they will only germinate and grow if the right type of fungus is in the soil. They join with the fungus and feed off it. Other orchids are totally parasitic and some like the Ghost Orchid only appear and flower every 18 years! Weird! Hope to get to the fens next week to find Marsh Helleborine.


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