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Old 18-07-2003, 07:52 AM
Lil
 
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Default growing orchids outside = burned orchids?

After a week growing orchids outside in Napa, I noticed that some of
the orchids were developing straw-colored patches that kind of the
same color as ripe corn.

Are they burn patches, where the part of the plant may have had some
direct sun-exposure? Will the plants recover? (I've moved them back
inside where temperatures don't fluctuate as much. I noticed that the
temperatures have a 30 degree range outside. ranging from 60's to
90's.)

Any ideas on how I can resuscitate the orchids will be greatly
appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Lil

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Old 18-07-2003, 12:12 PM
Ray
 
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Default growing orchids outside = burned orchids?

Definitely sounds like burning, but the temperature, per se, isn't the
issue, and it's certainly not the day-night fluctuation in ambient
temperatures. What is likely to have happened is that they received too
much direct sunlight for the types of orchids they are, or were not properly
transitioned into a brighter environment from one that what less so -
probably a combination of the two. The result is that you get localized
overheating due to the solar energy, with the ambient temperature being a
relatively minor, but contributing factor.

The damaged tissue will not recover, but now that your plants are no longer
in such conditions, they ought to grow normally and will eventually lose the
damaged leaves.

I recommend that you do not attempt to remove the damaged tissue, as the
patches are not open wounds, so do not provide a path to allow pathogens in.

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Books, Artwork, and Lots of Free Info!

.. . . . . . . . . . .
"Lil" wrote in message
om...
After a week growing orchids outside in Napa, I noticed that some of
the orchids were developing straw-colored patches that kind of the
same color as ripe corn.

Are they burn patches, where the part of the plant may have had some
direct sun-exposure? Will the plants recover? (I've moved them back
inside where temperatures don't fluctuate as much. I noticed that the
temperatures have a 30 degree range outside. ranging from 60's to
90's.)

Any ideas on how I can resuscitate the orchids will be greatly
appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Lil



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Old 18-07-2003, 02:32 PM
Diane Mancino
 
Posts: n/a
Default growing orchids outside = burned orchids?

whoops-same situation on a catt leaf. the leaf was turning yellow after a
black spot. I cut off the burnt leave- treated cut with physan.
"Ray" wrote in message
...
Definitely sounds like burning, but the temperature, per se, isn't the
issue, and it's certainly not the day-night fluctuation in ambient
temperatures. What is likely to have happened is that they received too
much direct sunlight for the types of orchids they are, or were not

properly
transitioned into a brighter environment from one that what less so -
probably a combination of the two. The result is that you get localized
overheating due to the solar energy, with the ambient temperature being a
relatively minor, but contributing factor.

The damaged tissue will not recover, but now that your plants are no

longer
in such conditions, they ought to grow normally and will eventually lose

the
damaged leaves.

I recommend that you do not attempt to remove the damaged tissue, as the
patches are not open wounds, so do not provide a path to allow pathogens

in.

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Books, Artwork, and Lots of Free Info!

. . . . . . . . . . .
"Lil" wrote in message
om...
After a week growing orchids outside in Napa, I noticed that some of
the orchids were developing straw-colored patches that kind of the
same color as ripe corn.

Are they burn patches, where the part of the plant may have had some
direct sun-exposure? Will the plants recover? (I've moved them back
inside where temperatures don't fluctuate as much. I noticed that the
temperatures have a 30 degree range outside. ranging from 60's to
90's.)

Any ideas on how I can resuscitate the orchids will be greatly
appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Lil





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Old 18-07-2003, 05:32 PM
K Barrett
 
Posts: n/a
Default growing orchids outside = burned orchids?

Interesting. I don't cut off the dried portion because any undamaged green
portion of teh leaf beyond it still will photosynthesize and make food for
the plant, which still transports through or around the dried portion, so
IMHO the dried spot is ugly but maintaining the leaf is beneficial for the
plant.

This is speaking of sun damage only. Not bacterial rot.

K Barrett


"Diane Mancino" wrote in message
...
whoops-same situation on a catt leaf. the leaf was turning yellow after a
black spot. I cut off the burnt leave- treated cut with physan.
"Ray" wrote in message
...
Definitely sounds like burning, but the temperature, per se, isn't the
issue, and it's certainly not the day-night fluctuation in ambient
temperatures. What is likely to have happened is that they received too
much direct sunlight for the types of orchids they are, or were not

properly
transitioned into a brighter environment from one that what less so -
probably a combination of the two. The result is that you get localized
overheating due to the solar energy, with the ambient temperature being

a
relatively minor, but contributing factor.

The damaged tissue will not recover, but now that your plants are no

longer
in such conditions, they ought to grow normally and will eventually lose

the
damaged leaves.

I recommend that you do not attempt to remove the damaged tissue, as the
patches are not open wounds, so do not provide a path to allow pathogens

in.

--

Ray Barkalow - First Rays Orchids - www.firstrays.com
Plants, Supplies, Books, Artwork, and Lots of Free Info!

. . . . . . . . . . .
"Lil" wrote in message
om...
After a week growing orchids outside in Napa, I noticed that some of
the orchids were developing straw-colored patches that kind of the
same color as ripe corn.

Are they burn patches, where the part of the plant may have had some
direct sun-exposure? Will the plants recover? (I've moved them back
inside where temperatures don't fluctuate as much. I noticed that the
temperatures have a 30 degree range outside. ranging from 60's to
90's.)

Any ideas on how I can resuscitate the orchids will be greatly
appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Lil







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Old 18-07-2003, 05:42 PM
Larry Dighera
 
Posts: n/a
Default growing orchids outside = burned orchids?

On 17 Jul 2003 22:48:18 -0700, (Lil) wrote in
Message-Id: :

After a week growing orchids outside in Napa, I noticed that some of
the orchids were developing straw-colored patches that kind of the
same color as ripe corn.


If the patches are the color of white corn, it is likely that those
areas will die. If the patches are the color of yellow corn, there is
a possibility that the plant will recover its more normal green color
over several weeks if removed from the overly bright conditions.

Are they burn patches, where the part of the plant may have had some
direct sun-exposure?


That would be my guess.

Will the plants recover? (I've moved them back
inside where temperatures don't fluctuate as much. I noticed that the
temperatures have a 30 degree range outside. ranging from 60's to
90's.) Any ideas on how I can resuscitate the orchids will be greatly
appreciated.


All but the very light leaf areas should eventually recover when
placed in a shadier location.

When moving orchid plants from indoors to outside it is important to
"harden" the plants. This is accomplished by making the changes in
light and temperature gradually over several days. Plants that are
able to withstand direct sun light will burn if not progressively
acclimatized to it.

You don't mention the genera with which you are working, but if they
are incapable of withstanding full sun all day, there are two
parameters to consider manipulating: light intensity and exposure
duration.

The high intensity of sun light may be moderated with shade cloth.
Covering a patio with beige 70% shade cloth should accommodate most
orchids needs well without being unsightly.

Many plants can withstand direct sun light without damage for periods
up to several hours, but burn if exposed all day long. The duration
the plant receives direct/bright light can be reduced by placing it in
an eastern exposure, or under other foliage to provide more dappled
lighting conditions. Microclimate is everything.






  #6   Report Post  
Old 18-07-2003, 05:52 PM
Diane Mancino
 
Posts: n/a
Default growing orchids outside = burned orchids?

I went wrong by no acclimatizing. that was dumb of me, but I had put my zygo
and cyms out without any trouble, so just added the catt to the shelf and
went to work. It didn't take long to damage since I only get a few hours
direct sun- what made it worse was that it was finally a hot day 85 degrees
and by this time the other plants were used to it.

Its raining today- all day rain I guess the plants will enjoy this- there
will be no drying out if it rains all week, but that happens in natural
settings- can't see a plant rotting in the wild


"Larry Dighera" wrote in message
...
On 17 Jul 2003 22:48:18 -0700, (Lil) wrote in
Message-Id: :

After a week growing orchids outside in Napa, I noticed that some of
the orchids were developing straw-colored patches that kind of the
same color as ripe corn.


If the patches are the color of white corn, it is likely that those
areas will die. If the patches are the color of yellow corn, there is
a possibility that the plant will recover its more normal green color
over several weeks if removed from the overly bright conditions.

Are they burn patches, where the part of the plant may have had some
direct sun-exposure?


That would be my guess.

Will the plants recover? (I've moved them back
inside where temperatures don't fluctuate as much. I noticed that the
temperatures have a 30 degree range outside. ranging from 60's to
90's.) Any ideas on how I can resuscitate the orchids will be greatly
appreciated.


All but the very light leaf areas should eventually recover when
placed in a shadier location.

When moving orchid plants from indoors to outside it is important to
"harden" the plants. This is accomplished by making the changes in
light and temperature gradually over several days. Plants that are
able to withstand direct sun light will burn if not progressively
acclimatized to it.

You don't mention the genera with which you are working, but if they
are incapable of withstanding full sun all day, there are two
parameters to consider manipulating: light intensity and exposure
duration.

The high intensity of sun light may be moderated with shade cloth.
Covering a patio with beige 70% shade cloth should accommodate most
orchids needs well without being unsightly.

Many plants can withstand direct sun light without damage for periods
up to several hours, but burn if exposed all day long. The duration
the plant receives direct/bright light can be reduced by placing it in
an eastern exposure, or under other foliage to provide more dappled
lighting conditions. Microclimate is everything.








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