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Old 19-08-2003, 02:42 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

Ok, another newbie question.

Is there any reason not to put multiple plants that have the same
requirements in the same pot? Each would have plenty of room. Reason
for this is that a few larger pots are simply easier to deal with in
my situation than many smaller pots. TIA

Gannet
St. Petersburg, Florida

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Old 19-08-2003, 05:02 PM
GrlIntrpted
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

I had and still have several Phal hybrids that live in complete harmony in
one pot. I don't know if there a reason why it shouldn't be done, but I
don't see any unless one is sick or gets sick and infects the other...but if
you maintain your orchids well....I don't see a reason why not.

Mariana

wrote in message
...
Ok, another newbie question.

Is there any reason not to put multiple plants that have the same
requirements in the same pot? Each would have plenty of room. Reason
for this is that a few larger pots are simply easier to deal with in
my situation than many smaller pots. TIA

Gannet
St. Petersburg, Florida



  #3   Report Post  
Old 19-08-2003, 05:22 PM
Kenni Judd
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

Putting multiple plants in one pot will generally disqualify them for award
judging. If that's not a concern, and you stick with similar plants [i.e.,
3 phals in a pot, not 1 catt, 1 oncid and 1 phal all in 1 pot], it's usually
not a big problem.

--
Kenni Judd
Juno Beach Orchids

http://www.jborchids.com
wrote in message
...
Ok, another newbie question.

Is there any reason not to put multiple plants that have the same
requirements in the same pot? Each would have plenty of room. Reason
for this is that a few larger pots are simply easier to deal with in
my situation than many smaller pots. TIA

Gannet
St. Petersburg, Florida




  #5   Report Post  
Old 19-08-2003, 06:02 PM
GrlIntrpted
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

Actually, that depends on the particular orchid. For instance, ever since
I've repotted all my Paphs into deeper pots, they started performing much
better than in the past when slightly pot bound. Same with several of the
Phalaenopsis hybrids.

Mariana

"Geir Harris Hedemark" wrote in message
...
writes:
Each would have plenty of room. Reason


According to the experts, orchids mostly doesn't like to have plenty
of room.

I can't say I have noticed any difference, but I am not an expert
either.

Geir





  #7   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2003, 03:32 AM
Cecil Kimber
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

Hello everyone,
I purchased a flask of Hwra. Lava Burst 'Puanani' from Al last winter.
I put them all in two large com pots. This spring I potted out one of the
compots but because of a lack of bench space (I'm sure I'm the only orchid
hobbyist who has that problem ;-)) I left the other compot intact. To make
a long story short, the plants in the compot are throwing up spikes like
nobody's business the ones in their own pots, not a one. I don't show my
plants so I think I'll just leave the bloomers alone!
Cec
"Gene Schurg" wrote in message
.net...
Gannet,

Don't do it! Someday when the plants grow larger you will want to

separate
them. Orchids are not like petunias where you can just slice through the
root ball and expect them to do well.

Additionally, if one of the plants die and dry up you won't be able to

pick
it out very easily.

If you have problems with smaller pots get a larger cache pot and sit the
plants together (pot and all) into the bigger pot.

Good Growing,
Gene



wrote in message
...
Ok, another newbie question.

Is there any reason not to put multiple plants that have the same
requirements in the same pot? Each would have plenty of room. Reason
for this is that a few larger pots are simply easier to deal with in
my situation than many smaller pots. TIA

Gannet
St. Petersburg, Florida





  #8   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2003, 03:43 AM
Gene Schurg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

Cecil,

My guess is that the compot that you left intact is blooming because the
plants are crowded. When plants feel threatened they send up flowers to
make seeds and create new plants.

The repotted plants are happily making vegetative growth until they feel
tight in their pots and then they will bloom.

Your problem is going to be trying to divide the compot. Eventually you're
going to have to do it. The roots will be intertwined and may prove
difficult to separate.

Good Growing,
Gene



"Cecil Kimber" wrote in message
news:dzx0b.201044$o%[email protected]
Hello everyone,
I purchased a flask of Hwra. Lava Burst 'Puanani' from Al last

winter.
I put them all in two large com pots. This spring I potted out one of the
compots but because of a lack of bench space (I'm sure I'm the only orchid
hobbyist who has that problem ;-)) I left the other compot intact. To

make
a long story short, the plants in the compot are throwing up spikes like
nobody's business the ones in their own pots, not a one. I don't show my
plants so I think I'll just leave the bloomers alone!
Cec
"Gene Schurg" wrote in message
.net...
Gannet,

Don't do it! Someday when the plants grow larger you will want to

separate
them. Orchids are not like petunias where you can just slice through

the
root ball and expect them to do well.

Additionally, if one of the plants die and dry up you won't be able to

pick
it out very easily.

If you have problems with smaller pots get a larger cache pot and sit

the
plants together (pot and all) into the bigger pot.

Good Growing,
Gene



wrote in message
...
Ok, another newbie question.

Is there any reason not to put multiple plants that have the same
requirements in the same pot? Each would have plenty of room. Reason
for this is that a few larger pots are simply easier to deal with in
my situation than many smaller pots. TIA

Gannet
St. Petersburg, Florida







  #9   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2003, 05:32 AM
Cecil Kimber
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

Gene,
Your conjecture is the same as mine on the cause of the early blooming.
Most plants bloom as a response to the potential for imminent demise. You
want them healthy enough to have the energy for a good display yet not too
certain of what tomorrow will bring.
Why would I need to break up the compot? I've seen mature plants in
this size pot. I don't think it would be much more difficult than dividing
any large plant. It's not my favorite task but it is doable. I do
appreciate your observations.
Cec
"Gene Schurg" wrote in message
.net...
Cecil,

My guess is that the compot that you left intact is blooming because the
plants are crowded. When plants feel threatened they send up flowers to
make seeds and create new plants.

The repotted plants are happily making vegetative growth until they feel
tight in their pots and then they will bloom.

Your problem is going to be trying to divide the compot. Eventually

you're
going to have to do it. The roots will be intertwined and may prove
difficult to separate.

Good Growing,
Gene



"Cecil Kimber" wrote in message
news:dzx0b.201044$o%[email protected]
Hello everyone,
I purchased a flask of Hwra. Lava Burst 'Puanani' from Al last

winter.
I put them all in two large com pots. This spring I potted out one of

the
compots but because of a lack of bench space (I'm sure I'm the only

orchid
hobbyist who has that problem ;-)) I left the other compot intact. To

make
a long story short, the plants in the compot are throwing up spikes like
nobody's business the ones in their own pots, not a one. I don't show

my
plants so I think I'll just leave the bloomers alone!
Cec
"Gene Schurg" wrote in message
.net...
Gannet,

Don't do it! Someday when the plants grow larger you will want to

separate
them. Orchids are not like petunias where you can just slice through

the
root ball and expect them to do well.

Additionally, if one of the plants die and dry up you won't be able to

pick
it out very easily.

If you have problems with smaller pots get a larger cache pot and sit

the
plants together (pot and all) into the bigger pot.

Good Growing,
Gene



wrote in message
...
Ok, another newbie question.

Is there any reason not to put multiple plants that have the same
requirements in the same pot? Each would have plenty of room.

Reason
for this is that a few larger pots are simply easier to deal with in
my situation than many smaller pots. TIA

Gannet
St. Petersburg, Florida








  #10   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2003, 12:02 PM
Diane Mancino
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

I have similar seedlings that I have in flexible plastic pots and squeeze 3
round ones into a bigger pot. Make sure the potting mix isn't disturbed,
but at least you can take out any sick plant.
"Cecil Kimber" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Gene,
Your conjecture is the same as mine on the cause of the early

blooming.
Most plants bloom as a response to the potential for imminent demise. You
want them healthy enough to have the energy for a good display yet not too
certain of what tomorrow will bring.
Why would I need to break up the compot? I've seen mature plants in
this size pot. I don't think it would be much more difficult than

dividing
any large plant. It's not my favorite task but it is doable. I do
appreciate your observations.
Cec
"Gene Schurg" wrote in message
.net...
Cecil,

My guess is that the compot that you left intact is blooming because the
plants are crowded. When plants feel threatened they send up flowers to
make seeds and create new plants.

The repotted plants are happily making vegetative growth until they feel
tight in their pots and then they will bloom.

Your problem is going to be trying to divide the compot. Eventually

you're
going to have to do it. The roots will be intertwined and may prove
difficult to separate.

Good Growing,
Gene



"Cecil Kimber" wrote in message
news:dzx0b.201044$o%[email protected]
Hello everyone,
I purchased a flask of Hwra. Lava Burst 'Puanani' from Al last

winter.
I put them all in two large com pots. This spring I potted out one of

the
compots but because of a lack of bench space (I'm sure I'm the only

orchid
hobbyist who has that problem ;-)) I left the other compot intact. To

make
a long story short, the plants in the compot are throwing up spikes

like
nobody's business the ones in their own pots, not a one. I don't show

my
plants so I think I'll just leave the bloomers alone!
Cec
"Gene Schurg" wrote in message
.net...
Gannet,

Don't do it! Someday when the plants grow larger you will want to
separate
them. Orchids are not like petunias where you can just slice

through
the
root ball and expect them to do well.

Additionally, if one of the plants die and dry up you won't be able

to
pick
it out very easily.

If you have problems with smaller pots get a larger cache pot and

sit
the
plants together (pot and all) into the bigger pot.

Good Growing,
Gene



wrote in message
...
Ok, another newbie question.

Is there any reason not to put multiple plants that have the same
requirements in the same pot? Each would have plenty of room.

Reason
for this is that a few larger pots are simply easier to deal with

in
my situation than many smaller pots. TIA

Gannet
St. Petersburg, Florida












  #11   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2003, 11:22 PM
Gene Schurg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any reason not to put multiple plants in one pot?

Cecil,

I would think the competition between different plants would reduce the
vigorousness (is that a word?) of all of the plants. You may get more
flower spikes but I would expect them to have fewer and smaller flowers.

I guess dividing it could be similar to a large brassia with multiple
growths. Just may set back the plants a bit until they recover their root
masses.

Good Growing,
Gene




"Cecil Kimber" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Gene,
Your conjecture is the same as mine on the cause of the early

blooming.
Most plants bloom as a response to the potential for imminent demise. You
want them healthy enough to have the energy for a good display yet not too
certain of what tomorrow will bring.
Why would I need to break up the compot? I've seen mature plants in
this size pot. I don't think it would be much more difficult than

dividing
any large plant. It's not my favorite task but it is doable. I do
appreciate your observations.
Cec
"Gene Schurg" wrote in message
.net...
Cecil,

My guess is that the compot that you left intact is blooming because the
plants are crowded. When plants feel threatened they send up flowers to
make seeds and create new plants.

The repotted plants are happily making vegetative growth until they feel
tight in their pots and then they will bloom.

Your problem is going to be trying to divide the compot. Eventually

you're
going to have to do it. The roots will be intertwined and may prove
difficult to separate.

Good Growing,
Gene



"Cecil Kimber" wrote in message
news:dzx0b.201044$o%[email protected]
Hello everyone,
I purchased a flask of Hwra. Lava Burst 'Puanani' from Al last

winter.
I put them all in two large com pots. This spring I potted out one of

the
compots but because of a lack of bench space (I'm sure I'm the only

orchid
hobbyist who has that problem ;-)) I left the other compot intact. To

make
a long story short, the plants in the compot are throwing up spikes

like
nobody's business the ones in their own pots, not a one. I don't show

my
plants so I think I'll just leave the bloomers alone!
Cec
"Gene Schurg" wrote in message
.net...
Gannet,

Don't do it! Someday when the plants grow larger you will want to
separate
them. Orchids are not like petunias where you can just slice

through
the
root ball and expect them to do well.

Additionally, if one of the plants die and dry up you won't be able

to
pick
it out very easily.

If you have problems with smaller pots get a larger cache pot and

sit
the
plants together (pot and all) into the bigger pot.

Good Growing,
Gene



wrote in message
...
Ok, another newbie question.

Is there any reason not to put multiple plants that have the same
requirements in the same pot? Each would have plenty of room.

Reason
for this is that a few larger pots are simply easier to deal with

in
my situation than many smaller pots. TIA

Gannet
St. Petersburg, Florida












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